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The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2013, 16:46
mikemcgarry wrote:
aarchak wrote:
Hello Mike,

Thanks for the explanation, I now understand why C is a contender.

Had a quick question that I wanted to put across to you..

Isn't the sale of something that is mentioned to be free in the premise a little weird to accept while choosing the answer? I disregarded C for this very reason.

Dear aarchak,
I'm happy to help. :-)

The prompt argument says:
The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

That lets us know that some of the online do-it-yourself instructions, but we don't know that all of them are free. The fact that some are free would make it even harder to sell the ones that aren't free.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)


Makes sense. I shouldn't have blatantly ruled out the possibility of paid DIY instructions to exist just because the converse is true. Thanks for the quick response.

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2013, 13:43
TGC wrote:
The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

Which of the following can be inferred from the argument above?

(A) The number of people who are not home repair technicians and who have been injured while attempting home repairs has increased.

(B) Most people who are injured while attempting home repairs have done so while following instructions found in free do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet.

(C) The overall sale of online do-it-yourself home repair instructions by home service technicians has not been equal to the loss of revenue the technicians have incurred due to free offerings of this sort of material.

(D) Most free do-it-yourself home repair instructions found on the Internet do not provide enough clear information regarding safety precautions.

(E) As more free do-it-yourself instructions for home repairs are made available on the Internet, home service technicians will suffer more losses in revenue.

Source: Veritas Prep Quiz
Good question it is !!!



while i was reading every option, I first eliminate the option C. See that is the answer now.. I think this question is too tough !

This line of stimulus force me to chose option B.
[highlight]Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.[/highlight

It says abt instructions !
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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2013, 15:55
mikemcgarry wrote:
aarchak wrote:
Hello Mike,

Thanks for the explanation, I now understand why C is a contender.

Had a quick question that I wanted to put across to you..

Isn't the sale of something that is mentioned to be free in the premise a little weird to accept while choosing the answer? I disregarded C for this very reason.

Dear aarchak,
I'm happy to help. :-)

The prompt argument says:
The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

That lets us know that some of the online do-it-yourself instructions, but we don't know that all of them are free. The fact that some are free would make it even harder to sell the ones that aren't free.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)



Hi,

Thanks for explaining why C is correct . I understand the point why C seems to be correct answer. But, I have a slightly different doubt:
According to me, Inference can be made only from the given argument (and we can not assume any other external info).
So, basically an inference is something which we can PRETHINK also by analyzing the given text only.

But in option C , it provides external info that is 'online do-it-yourself home repair instructions are sold by home service technicians', which is never mentioned in the argument. So this introduces external info , which makes this inference incorrect.

The argument should contain that home service technicians also sale online do-it-yourself home repair instructions in addition to doing service at home . Then only this ans would be correct.

Please let me know if i am wrong!!!!!!!

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2013, 16:22
Choice C brings in additional information to the premise which cannot be termed as inference. Inference is must be true premise based on the premise(s) and/or conclusion in the argument. This question make me think very strongly about how the GMAT official question could not be replaced with any prep company questions. i will stay away from such question and stick to official ones.
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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2013, 19:28
mayankmalik01 wrote:
Hi,

Thanks for explaining why C is correct . I understand the point why C seems to be correct answer. But, I have a slightly different doubt:
According to me, Inference can be made only from the given argument (and we can not assume any other external info).
So, basically an inference is something which we can PRETHINK also by analyzing the given text only.

But in option C , it provides external info that is 'online do-it-yourself home repair instructions are sold by home service technicians', which is never mentioned in the argument. So this introduces external info , which makes this inference incorrect.

The argument should contain that home service technicians also sale online do-it-yourself home repair instructions in addition to doing service at home . Then only this ans would be correct.

Please let me know if i am wrong!!!!!!!

Dear mayankmalik01,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, with all due respect, I want to point out a grammar flaw in what you wrote. The word "sale" is a noun, and the word "sell" is a verb. Does this make sense?

I would say that this argument doesn't bring in too much new information in the answer choice. I believe the GMAT itself does this some times. An inference should be a conclusion completely obvious from the prompt, but it may involve a detail not mentioned in the prompt.

Here, we don't know whether home service technicians sold online do-it-yourself home repair instructions. Maybe they did and maybe they didn't. We don't know. Choice (C) says: "The overall sale of online do-it-yourself home repair instructions by home service technicians has not been equal to the loss of revenue the technicians have incurred due to free offerings of this sort of material." Well, if there were absolutely no online sales, then the revenue from those sales would be zero, and they certainly would not be equal to money lost. The answer choice is perfectly correct even if the home service technicians sold nothing online.
We are told about a "decrease in revenue for home service technicians." We know for a fact that those folks have had a net decline in revenue. They have definitely lost revenue from service calls to people's homes. If they have had a net decline in revenue, that means whatever gain in revenue they have had, from any source, is not as big as what they lost because of the online offerings. The fact that the new source of revenue was not explicitly mentioned in the prompt is not a big issue here, because we already know that any source of revenue would not be equal to what they lost, because they had a net decline in revenue. The identity of the source of income is logically less important then the fact that it is a source of income. Think about if (C) were:
"Any additional source of revenue has not been equal to the loss of revenue the technicians have incurred due to free offerings of this sort of material." That is undeniably correct from the prompt. All they did was remove the generic "any source of revenue" and plug in a specific source of revenue. This change adds distracting detail but does not change anything in the fundamental logical relationships.

The PRETHINK rule that you cite is a bit too fundamentalist. It's perfectly fine for the OA to introduce a new idea if the logical framework for the idea is already treated in the prompt argument. Does this distinction make sense?

Mike :-)
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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2014, 08:16
But must be true means that it must be from the passage

or we can make assumptions outside also?

Because, from the passage, we can inferred that some people attempeted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2014, 14:35
peterparker123 wrote:
But must be true means that it must be from the passage

or we can make assumptions outside also?

Because, from the passage, we can inferred that some people attempeted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured

Dear peterparker123
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here's a blog article on this topic you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-criti ... inference/

An inference is something that MUST be true based on the passage. We absolutely cannot make new assumptions or bring in completely outside information --- that's always wrong. BUT, and this is the tricky thing that people sometimes overlook: you do have to make strict logical deductions from the information in the passage. Those deductions can lead to statements that you would have predicted.

What you say as an inference --- "some people attempted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured" --- yes, that would be an inference, but by GMAT standards, that's far too easy. The passage more or less hands that to you on a silver platter. That's not an example of the kind of inference the GMAT would ask you to make. Answer choice (C), the OA, is much more like a GMAT-like inference. Choice (C) is not something explicitly stated, not something we would be likely to predict from reading the passage, but when we get to (C) and think about it, we realize that it absolutely has to be true, given what is stated in the passage. That's much more typical of what the GMAT will demand.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2014, 20:09
mikemcgarry wrote:
peterparker123 wrote:
But must be true means that it must be from the passage

or we can make assumptions outside also?

Because, from the passage, we can inferred that some people attempeted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured

Dear peterparker123
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here's a blog article on this topic you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-criti ... inference/

An inference is something that MUST be true based on the passage. We absolutely cannot make new assumptions or bring in completely outside information --- that's always wrong. BUT, and this is the tricky thing that people sometimes overlook: you do have to make strict logical deductions from the information in the passage. Those deductions can lead to statements that you would have predicted.

What you say as an inference --- "some people attempted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured" --- yes, that would be an inference, but by GMAT standards, that's far too easy. The passage more or less hands that to you on a silver platter. That's not an example of the kind of inference the GMAT would ask you to make. Answer choice (C), the OA, is much more like a GMAT-like inference. Choice (C) is not something explicitly stated, not something we would be likely to predict from reading the passage, but when we get to (C) and think about it, we realize that it absolutely has to be true, given what is stated in the passage. That's much more typical of what the GMAT will demand.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)



Thanks Mike for the explanation :)

Yes, now I got it.

And ok, so we need to keep certain things in mind that GMAT questiosn will never have straight forward answer.

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2014, 08:36
mikemcgarry wrote:
peterparker123 wrote:
But must be true means that it must be from the passage

or we can make assumptions outside also?

Because, from the passage, we can inferred that some people attempeted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured

Dear peterparker123
I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here's a blog article on this topic you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-criti ... inference/

An inference is something that MUST be true based on the passage. We absolutely cannot make new assumptions or bring in completely outside information --- that's always wrong. BUT, and this is the tricky thing that people sometimes overlook: you do have to make strict logical deductions from the information in the passage. Those deductions can lead to statements that you would have predicted.

What you say as an inference --- "some people attempted DIYing by reading the free instructions, and these people got injured" --- yes, that would be an inference, but by GMAT standards, that's far too easy. The passage more or less hands that to you on a silver platter. That's not an example of the kind of inference the GMAT would ask you to make. Answer choice (C), the OA, is much more like a GMAT-like inference. Choice (C) is not something explicitly stated, not something we would be likely to predict from reading the passage, but when we get to (C) and think about it, we realize that it absolutely has to be true, given what is stated in the passage. That's much more typical of what the GMAT will demand.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Mike, can you write a little about what's wrong with option A?

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2014, 10:37
ronr34 wrote:
Mike, can you write a little about what's wrong with option A?

Dear ronr34,
I'm happy to respond, my friend. :-)

Here's the prompt again:
The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

Which of the following can be inferred from the argument above?


Here's option (A):
(A) The number of people who are not home repair technicians and who have been injured while attempting home repairs has increased.

Now, the very important thing to remember about a GMAT CR inference question --- we are NOT looking for something that COULD be true, that plausibly would be true, or even for something that is probably true. None of those meet the mark. We are looking for something that absolutely, without a doubt, MUST be true, something that absolutely couldn't not be true, based on the information in the prompt. See this article for a longer discussion:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-criti ... inference/

On a GMAT CR question, there will be one correct answer that absolutely, non-negotiably, MUST be true, and then four other wrong answers that are all plausible, all things that we reasonably imagine could be true; in fact, for some of them, it may requires some very special conditions for them not to be true. The point is, though --- as long as it is even remotely possible that a statement is not true, then it is not a solid inference from the GMAT's point of view.

Could (A) be false?
We absolutely know from the prompt argument that the number of injuries has increased --- does this mean a larger number of people are getting injured, as (A) suggests, or does it mean the same unskilled people who have injured themselves before haven't learned and are injuring themselves again in their continued bumbling attempts at home repair? In other words, the number of injuries could increase without a corresponding increase in the total number of individuals who have been injured. Is this likely? I don't know, but that doesn't matter. It's possible for (A) to be false, given the information in the prompt, and as soon as we can imagine that (A) could possibly be false, it is absolutely disqualified as a GMAT CR inference.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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mikemcgarry wrote:
ronr34 wrote:
Mike, can you write a little about what's wrong with option A?

Dear ronr34,
I'm happy to respond, my friend. :-)

Here's the prompt again:
The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

Which of the following can be inferred from the argument above?


Here's option (A):
(A) The number of people who are not home repair technicians and who have been injured while attempting home repairs has increased.

Now, the very important thing to remember about a GMAT CR inference question --- we are NOT looking for something that COULD be true, that plausibly would be true, or even for something that is probably true. None of those meet the mark. We are looking for something that absolutely, without a doubt, MUST be true, something that absolutely couldn't not be true, based on the information in the prompt. See this article for a longer discussion:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-criti ... inference/

On a GMAT CR question, there will be one correct answer that absolutely, non-negotiably, MUST be true, and then four other wrong answers that are all plausible, all things that we reasonably imagine could be true; in fact, for some of them, it may requires some very special conditions for them not to be true. The point is, though --- as long as it is even remotely possible that a statement is not true, then it is not a solid inference from the GMAT's point of view.

Could (A) be false?
We absolutely know from the prompt argument that the number of injuries has increased --- does this mean a larger number of people are getting injured, as (A) suggests, or does it mean the same unskilled people who have injured themselves before haven't learned and are injuring themselves again in their continued bumbling attempts at home repair? In other words, the number of injuries could increase without a corresponding increase in the total number of individuals who have been injured. Is this likely? I don't know, but that doesn't matter. It's possible for (A) to be false, given the information in the prompt, and as soon as we can imagine that (A) could possibly be false, it is absolutely disqualified as a GMAT CR inference.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Thanks! This puts to bed a few problems I had with this question.
When I read this question, it was clear to me that the people getting hurt are a different set of people than the "home service technicians". Am I correct in inferring that part at least, or is this also a stretch?

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2014, 10:52
ronr34 wrote:
Thanks! This puts to bed a few problems I had with this question.
When I read this question, it was clear to me that the people getting hurt are a different set of people than the "home service technicians". Am I correct in inferring that part at least, or is this also a stretch?

Dear ronr34,
Great question! That's a detail in a gray area --- the argument absolutely would not make sense if those two were not different groups, but technically, we have no explicit guarantee that they are different. Technically, it's the explicit evidence that we have trust, not necessarily the validity of the argument as a whole, although the GMAT always gives a valid argument on an inference question. This is very much in a gray area.
I would say --- something of this sort the GMAT wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole. It's not quite up to the standard of a right answer for an inference question, but it's far too close to be a wrong answer. The GMAT is very good about giving us one unambiguously right answer and four unambiguously wrong answers. They scrupulously avoid anything in a gray zone.
Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2014, 18:00
Kris01 wrote:
Hello Supriya,

The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

What the passage tells us is that there is a reduction in the revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by the people who have attempted home repairs themselves. The passage further mentions that this is because do-it yourself(diy) instructions are not as good as they should be. Our aim is to find which of the stated options could be inferred from the passage.

Now, let us analyze statements b and c.

b) Most people who are injured while attempting home repairs have done so while following instructions found in free do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet.

The passage does mention that the do-it-yourself instructions are not up to mark. However, nowhere does the passage suggest that the instructions are wrongfully written or have some flaws which led to the increase in accidents. We cannot even be sure of whether those who met with accidents followed the instructions states in the diy manuals religiously. They could have committed some mistakes which might have led to accidents. Since, we cannot be completely sure of whether option b is true or not, based on the information in the passage, this statement in clearly not the one we are looking for.

Now, let us analyze option c.

c) The overall sale of online do-it-yourself home repair instructions by home service technicians has not been equal to the loss of revenue the technicians have incurred due to free offerings of this sort of material.

We already know that the free sale of online diy home repair instructions has caused a decrease in revenue for home service technicians. Statement c tells us that home technicians also sell the diy home repair instructions online. However, even though they might sell these instructions online, the revenue generated by this sale would not be equal to the decrease in revenue due to free offerings. If these values were equal, then they would not have incurred any decrease in net revenue at all. They would have either faced a no profit-no loss situation or a profitable earnings as their loss in revenue earned by home repair would have been negated by profit generated by online sale of diy instruction manuals. However, the passage mentions that there is a reduction in revenue for home technicians and hence, this statement can be inferred.

Hope this helps! Let me know if you need any further clarification.

Supriya90 wrote:
Can anyone explain y is it "c"? Y not "B"?




Hello Kris. But what if the operating cost of such a venture is tremendously high? How did you conclude that just because the revenue is potentially higher which will also drive the profits higher? Please help!

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New post 31 Oct 2015, 13:43
Thank you, dear GMAT clubbers, for your contributions towards explanation for this question, however, for the life of me, i cannot seem to understand how can C be the right answer.
Inference questions are supposed to be based on the information provided in the stimulus, and we have to deduce what must be correct to infer from it, however, answer choice C seems to offer waaaaaay of a stretch from the stimulus to the inference, unlike, say, answer choice D - this AC provides a much more direct inference than the one that technicians used to make money off online DIY instructions, and free online ones are getting in the way of their income.

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New post 13 Apr 2016, 03:30
TGC wrote:
The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians and an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. Unfortunately, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

Which of the following can be inferred from the argument above?

(A) The number of people who are not home repair technicians and who have been injured while attempting home repairs has increased.

(B) Most people who are injured while attempting home repairs have done so while following instructions found in free do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet.

(C) The overall sale of online do-it-yourself home repair instructions by home service technicians has not been equal to the loss of revenue the technicians have incurred due to free offerings of this sort of material.

(D) Most free do-it-yourself home repair instructions found on the Internet do not provide enough clear information regarding safety precautions.

(E) As more free do-it-yourself instructions for home repairs are made available on the Internet, home service technicians will suffer more losses in revenue.

Source: Veritas Prep Quiz
Good question it is !!!


I'm now a non-paid old CR file bumper.
I love this question. But there are many objections from users who commented. I find this surprising. this is because the question stem is a bit more RESTRICTIED than some inference questions that ask you, "WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING CAN BE MOST PROPERLY INFERRED?", and then you might crack comparing two options to know which is less conclusive so as to eliminate it.
This one is pretty straightforward. Which of the following can be inferred from the argument above?.
This means that no other one can be inferred other than the answer.
A seems close, but it might not be true. Inference MUST be true.
C must be true. this is not assumption. Some options are assumptions. If it is full proof then it's no assumption but an inference.

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2016, 17:56
ConnectTheDots wrote:
I thought it to B. Could someone please help on this ?


Hi there,

The statements establishes that there has been a rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet for home repairs and this has led to a decrease in revenue for home service technicians an increase in the number of injuries caused by people who have attempted home repairs themselves. And it also states that, not all of the do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet are written as well as they should be.

So we know could pre-think that whether due to the "free, do-it-yourself internet niche" home service technicians have made money or not, in general, if they have made money, this represents less money than what they´ve forgone from their traditional business. Also, we could pre-think that some of the do-it yourself instructions are not clearly written (restatement), etc.

Let´s analyze the statements:

(A) The number of people who are not home repair technicians and who have been injured while attempting home repairs has increased. We have no ground to state this, but it is close

(B) Most people who are injured while attempting home repairs have done so while following instructions found in free do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet. Tempting but we don´t know anything about these statistics. What if just 40% of the people who were injured were following free do-it-yourself instructions on the Internet (this is less than most).

(C) The overall sale of online do-it-yourself home repair instructions by home service technicians has not been equal to the loss of revenue the technicians have incurred due to free offerings of this sort of material. This is exactly one our pre-thoughts. If they lost business overall, then whether they (the technicians) through the "free, do-it-yourself internet niche" made money or not, the money they could have made represents less money than what they have forgone from their traditional business.

(D) Most free do-it-yourself home repair instructions found on the Internet do not provide enough clear information regarding safety precautions. Tempting, but we don´t know anything about this statistic to say "most" or anything like it.

(E) As more free do-it-yourself instructions for home repairs are made available on the Internet, home service technicians will suffer more losses in revenue. This could be true or false. Online instructions could increase and fewer people would contact home service technicians. Maybe the market stabilizes or maybe it expands with the advent of new technologies, social media, etc. A past result/trend is not necessarily a good predictor of the future.

Hope this helps!

Best,

EISP

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2016, 11:59
Disagree with the question. Inference cannot have extraneous assumptions. There is no possibility to assume that these home repair technicians sell materials online as the question does not state such a line of business but phrased as though it is a DIY books vs actual visiting technicians. Good reason now to believe Mcelroytutoring's post recently in verbal forum not to use any questions other than official ones for practice!

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2017, 11:58
okay, here is an assumption of the passage. That is, the do-it-yourself instructions should only be written by home service technicians because nobody else has adequate knowledge to do that.

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Re: The rise in free, do-it-yourself instructions on the   [#permalink] 22 Sep 2017, 11:58

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