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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2019, 17:02
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Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)


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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


(A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

(B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

(C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

(D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

(E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving

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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2019, 00:59
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generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving

Source: PowerScore

The best or excellent answers get kudos, which will be awarded after the answer is revealed.
More than one award of kudos is possible.


The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot".

Meaning:

1. The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed
2. Polygaia nana is the native southeastern United States plant
3. Because { The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed } Polygaia nana has nickname "candyroot".

Errors:

By the meaning analysis we can infer that there is no error in the sentence.
Conveyed meaing is clear, and v-ing modifier correctly modifies preceding clause and gives reason why Polygaia nana has nickname "candyroot".

Attachment:
Polygala nana.JPG
Polygala nana.JPG [ 84.94 KiB | Viewed 2431 times ]


So -->
Attachment:
A.JPG
A.JPG [ 60.98 KiB | Viewed 2428 times ]


POE

If we have good grasp of intended meaning of the sentence, we can easily find that correct answer is A.

A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving
(Polygaia nana is giving itself nickname - illogical)

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives
(Polygaia nana gives itself nickname - illogical)

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so
(comma + so - starts new IC but there is no verb to be full clause)

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving
( the roots are giving nickname - illogical)

(A) is the answer


Attachment:
The attachment Polygala nana.JPG is no longer available

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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2019, 19:24
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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plan the nickname "candyroot."


Quote:
A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving


Correct. "Giving" is an -ing modifier....explains HOW tasting like liquorice when chewed => nickname.

Quote:
B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving


A plant cannot "give" itself a nickname.

Quote:
C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives


Same as B.

Quote:
D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so


It started off good....but the "so" seems to foreshadow an independent clause, but is not completed by the rest of the underline. Next!

Quote:
E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving


Use simple verb "give" instead of "are giving."
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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2019, 00:13
A quick note, its supposed to be plants and not plan right? :)

anyway, here we go!

The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plan the nickname "candyroot."



A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving I like

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving Is giving is clearly the wrong verb structure.

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives This structure is a mess. you CAN start a sentence with because despite what we learned in gradeschool but it is a specific instance (which I forgot :()

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so So ...the southeastern plant. there needs to be a verb here. (right?)

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving Roots should be followed by the infinitive verb.
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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2019, 22:13
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generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)



The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving


OFFICIAL EXPLANATION/ MY ANALYSIS

We need a structure in which the plant's
roots taste like licorice, a taste that gives the plant its nickname "candyroot."

The taste (that gives) is a "summative" modifier (a word, usually a noun phrase, that summarizes the idea
in the preceding clause).

Rather than using a summative modifer, we can use COMMA + verbING.
That is, a present participial modifier such as giving modifies the entire preceding clause.

• Option A has no errors.
The logic is clean because comma + verbING modifies the "roots that taste like licorice" —
[thus] giving the plant its nickname "candyroot."

comma + verbING =
a present participial modifier phrase that can, among other things, indicate the result or effect of the preceding clause.
What is the "cause" of the nickname? Its roots taste like licorice.
What is the effect of the fact that the roots taste like licorice? The plant is given a nickname "candyroot."

• Option B has a logical error and a verb error.

A plant cannot give itself a name. (The fact that its roots taste like licorice, coupled with
a modifier that can indicate result, can "give" a plant a nickname.)

Comma + which modifiers are non-essential.
If we remove that construction from B, we have
Polygaia nana, is giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."
Bad logic,

Further, the verb "is giving" indicates that the plant continually gives itself a nickname.
No. A plant gets a nickname, the end. However the nickname is given, the bestowal is not ongoing. :)

• C has the same logical problem as B does: a plant cannot give itself a name.

The verb "gives" is correct. But it must be the taste of the roots that gives the plant its nickname.
If the verb "gives" were swapped for "is given," option C would be okay.

• D has no verb in the dependent clause that begins with "SO"

• E has a logic problem and a verb problem.

Roots can't give a plant a name, either.
(The fact that the roots taste like licorice can give a plant a nickname.)

Even if roots could give a plant a nickname, the roots would not continuously be giving the plant its nickname.
There is no need for the present progressive verb tense, just as is the case in B.

The correct answer is A.
COMMENTS

anothermillenial , welcome!

MWithrock , sorry about the typo. It's edited.

As I mentioned, option C would be correct, even with its "because" clause, if the verb were
"is given" rather than "gives.

comma + verbING is among the most heavily tested of modifiers.
I would read this post, here for more information.

anothermillenial , you wrote an excellent answer. Kudos!
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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2019, 04:31
In the Correct ans option, with the structure as 'Subject + Verb [IC], verbING'
The Subject is not making sense with verb [of verbING]
The roots obviously are not giving out names.
Is this rule mandatory for verbING modifiers?
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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2019, 04:34
In the Correct ans option, with the structure as 'Subject + Verb [IC], verbING'
The Subject is not making sense with verb [of verbING]
The roots obviously are not giving out names.
Isnt this rule mandatory for verbING modifiers?
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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2019, 03:57
generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)


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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


(A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

(B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

(C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

(D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

(E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving

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generis : In option A, Verb-ing is not making that much sense, though it is the only correct answer available.

We use verb-ing modifier to show the result of the preceding clause, but I believe we we need an action verb in the main clause. "Taste like liquorice" is more of a comparison than an action.

In the morning, I do exercise and meditation, resulting in my improved efficiency. Here "doing exercise" and "meditation" are both action verbs.

Please clarify. I somehow don't feel in complete agreement with the OA.
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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2019, 22:53
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AkshdeepS wrote:
generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)


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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."

(A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving
(B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving
(C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives
(D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so
(E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving

Source: PowerScore

generis : In option A, Verb-ing is not making that much sense, though it is the only correct answer available.

We use verb-ing modifier to show the result of the preceding clause, but I believe we we need an action verb in the main clause. "Taste like liquorice" is more of a comparison than an action.

In the morning, I do exercise and meditation, resulting in my improved efficiency. Here "doing exercise" and "meditation" are both action verbs.

Please clarify. I somehow don't feel in complete agreement with the OA.

Hi AkshdeepS , I agree with you that very frequently, comma + participial modifier (verbING) presents the result of the previous clause.

I am not sure why you believe that verbING words must always present the result of action verbs in the previous clause.
Or maybe you believe that the construction you describe is required in this particular setup? If so, why?

I don't think participial modifiers are restricted to result phrases, but this area is hotly contested. See this GMAT Club thread, here, on "conceptual clarity" about ___ING modifiers, in which three experts do not seem to agree on a few key points. Such disagreement is okay.

• comma + ___ING

VerbING modifiers can modify the immediately preceding noun. See OG VR SC #285.

They can present extra information.
-- Spoiler alert: the answer to a question is revealed
This official question, here, involves a sloth hanging in a tree, sleeping a lot and moving infrequently. Neither of those italicized participles is a result.


In this case, though, I think we have fairly direct cause and result.
Perhaps because I am a native speaker, the sentence did not seem unnatural to me.

Essentially, some fact about something "gives it the name or nickname" ______.

• Examples

Each beam of the cathedral attic’s wooden frame is made from an individual tree — more than 1,300 in total — giving it the nickname “the forest.” (The em dash acts like a comma)
The New York Times, April 16, 2019 accessed September 5 2019

The power delivered by the electric grid in the United States — the kind that comes out of the socket on the wall — has electrons that dance back and forth 60 times a second, giving it the name “alternating current” or A.C.

[Meaning: The fact that the electric current's electrons dance back and forth cause it to have the name "alternating current."]
From The New York Times, here (accessed 9/5/2019)

Apparently a Manhattan-based doctor stole snake venom—no kidding—from snakes at the Bronx Zoo to treat hemophiliacs and to make antidotes for snakebites. About the snakes, the reporter wrote:
The inside of their mouths is white, giving them the name of cottonmouths.
The New York Times, March 31, 1935 (accessed 9/5/2019)

Similarly, the fact that a person slept in a park in Madrid caused it to be given a certain name.

“The Field of the Moor” is a reference to the 12th century attempt of a Moorish recapturing of Madrid. It has one of the most interesting stories of all the parks in Madrid: during this campaign to conquer what was then the Royal Alcazar of Madrid (now Royal Palace), a Moorish leader slept a night in this Madrid park, giving it the name Campo del Moro. Today it is situated on the western side of the Royal Gardens and is a lovely spot to visit.
That reference is HERE.

• THIS question?
I think it might be more helpful to think about "roots that taste like" not as a comparison but rather as a reported fact.
The fact that the roots taste sweet caused it to be given the name "candyroot."

Give can mean to produce a result or to cause something. here (see definition B1.

You wrote
Quote:
We use verb-ing modifier to show the result of the preceding clause

Yes, mostly. Sometimes not.

Participial modifiers (verbING modifiers) do not always have to show the result of the preceding clause, though typically they do. In this case, though, I think we have a result. We certainly have a logical connection. The verbal "giving" may seem a little strange.

As a result of the fact that the plant tastes sweet, it has been given the name candyroot.
Because the plant tastes sweet, it has been given the name candyroot.


• somewhat similar official question

This question reminds me of an official question in which the word "making" plays a role similar to "giving."
Spoiler alert: the answer is revealed.
OG 2020, SC #859 (what is it with the sloths?)
Fossils of the arm of a sloth, found in Puerto Rico in 1991, have been dated at 34 million years old, making the sloth the oldest living mammal on the Greater Achilles Islands.
-- In that sentence, the resultant status of the animal derives from facts about the animal.
The fact [that its fossil arms were dated at 34 million years old] makes the sloth the oldest living mammal on . . . .


The fact that the roots of the plant taste like licorice, or the fact that the roots of the plant are sweet, give [confer upon] the plant the nickname "candyroot."

I hope that helps. :) Let me know if you have any more questions.
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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving   [#permalink] 05 Sep 2019, 22:53
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