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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2019, 17:02
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

64% (01:17) correct 36% (01:51) wrong based on 142 sessions

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Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)


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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving

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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2019, 19:24
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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plan the nickname "candyroot."


Quote:
A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving


Correct. "Giving" is an -ing modifier....explains HOW tasting like liquorice when chewed => nickname.

Quote:
B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving


A plant cannot "give" itself a nickname.

Quote:
C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives


Same as B.

Quote:
D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so


It started off good....but the "so" seems to foreshadow an independent clause, but is not completed by the rest of the underline. Next!

Quote:
E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving


Use simple verb "give" instead of "are giving."
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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2019, 00:13
A quick note, its supposed to be plants and not plan right? :)

anyway, here we go!

The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plan the nickname "candyroot."



A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving I like

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving Is giving is clearly the wrong verb structure.

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives This structure is a mess. you CAN start a sentence with because despite what we learned in gradeschool but it is a specific instance (which I forgot :()

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so So ...the southeastern plant. there needs to be a verb here. (right?)

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving Roots should be followed by the infinitive verb.
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The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2019, 22:13
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generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)



The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving


OFFICIAL EXPLANATION/ MY ANALYSIS

We need a structure in which the plant's
roots taste like licorice, a taste that gives the plant its nickname "candyroot."

The taste (that gives) is a "summative" modifier (a word, usually a noun phrase, that summarizes the idea
in the preceding clause).

Rather than using a summative modifer, we can use COMMA + verbING.
That is, a present participial modifier such as giving modifies the entire preceding clause.

• Option A has no errors.
The logic is clean because comma + verbING modifies the "roots that taste like licorice" —
[thus] giving the plant its nickname "candyroot."

comma + verbING =
a present participial modifier phrase that can, among other things, indicate the result or effect of the preceding clause.
What is the "cause" of the nickname? Its roots taste like licorice.
What is the effect of the fact that the roots taste like licorice? The plant is given a nickname "candyroot."

• Option B has a logical error and a verb error.

A plant cannot give itself a name. (The fact that its roots taste like licorice, coupled with
a modifier that can indicate result, can "give" a plant a nickname.)

Comma + which modifiers are non-essential.
If we remove that construction from B, we have
Polygaia nana, is giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."
Bad logic,

Further, the verb "is giving" indicates that the plant continually gives itself a nickname.
No. A plant gets a nickname, the end. However the nickname is given, the bestowal is not ongoing. :)

• C has the same logical problem as B does: a plant cannot give itself a name.

The verb "gives" is correct. But it must be the taste of the roots that gives the plant its nickname.
If the verb "gives" were swapped for "is given," option C would be okay.

• D has no verb in the dependent clause that begins with "SO"

• E has a logic problem and a verb problem.

Roots can't give a plant a name, either.
(The fact that the roots taste like licorice can give a plant a nickname.)

Even if roots could give a plant a nickname, the roots would not continuously be giving the plant its nickname.
There is no need for the present progressive verb tense, just as is the case in B.

The correct answer is A.
COMMENTS

anothermillenial , welcome!

MWithrock , sorry about the typo. It's edited.

As I mentioned, option C would be correct, even with its "because" clause, if the verb were
"is given" rather than "gives.

comma + verbING is among the most heavily tested of modifiers.
I would read this post, here for more information.

anothermillenial , you wrote an excellent answer. Kudos!
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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2019, 00:59
generis wrote:

Project SC Butler: Day 111 Sentence Correction (SC1)


For SC butler Questions Click Here


The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot."


A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving

Source: PowerScore

The best or excellent answers get kudos, which will be awarded after the answer is revealed.
More than one award of kudos is possible.


The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving the native southeastern United States plant the nickname "candyroot".

Meaning:

1. The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed
2. Polygaia nana is the native southeastern United States plant
3. Because { The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed } Polygaia nana has nickname "candyroot".

Errors:

By the meaning analysis we can infer that there is no error in the sentence.
Conveyed meaing is clear, and v-ing modifier correctly modifies preceding clause and gives reason why Polygaia nana has nickname "candyroot".

Attachment:
A.JPG
A.JPG [ 60.98 KiB | Viewed 290 times ]


So -->
Attachment:
e-gmat note.JPG
e-gmat note.JPG [ 44.59 KiB | Viewed 291 times ]


POE

If we have good grasp of intended meaning of the sentence, we can easily find that correct answer is A.

A) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving

B) Polygaia nana, which has roots that taste like liquorice when chewed, is giving
(Polygaia nana is giving itself nickname - illogical)

C) Because the roots taste like liquorice when chewed, Polygaia nana gives
(Polygaia nana gives itself nickname - illogical)

D) The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, so
(comma + so - starts new IC but there is no verb to be full clause)

E) Tasting like liquorice when chewed, the roots of Polygaia nana are giving
( the roots are giving nickname - illogical)

(A) is the answer


Attachment:
Polygala nana.JPG
Polygala nana.JPG [ 84.94 KiB | Viewed 291 times ]

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Re: The roots of Polygaia nana taste like liquorice when chewed, giving   [#permalink] 11 Mar 2019, 00:59
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