GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 15 Nov 2018, 04:38

ISB R1 results on Nov 15:

Join Chat Room for Live Updates


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Strategy Webinar

     November 17, 2018

     November 17, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Nov. 17, 7 AM PST. Aiming to score 760+? Attend this FREE session to learn how to Define your GMAT Strategy, Create your Study Plan and Master the Core Skills to excel on the GMAT.
  • GMATbuster's Weekly GMAT Quant Quiz # 9

     November 17, 2018

     November 17, 2018

     09:00 AM PST

     11:00 AM PST

    Join the Quiz Saturday November 17th, 9 AM PST. The Quiz will last approximately 2 hours. Make sure you are on time or you will be at a disadvantage.

The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 23 Sep 2015
Posts: 1355
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2018, 22:48
2
8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

54% (01:35) correct 46% (01:25) wrong based on 135 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition: the numerical and algebraic relationships, which is how the word is popularly understood, doesn’t have much to do with the issues at the forefront of the field.

A. the numerical and algebraic relationships, which is how the word is popularly understood, doesn’t have much to do with
B. what the word means for most people, numerical and algebraic relationships, do not have a relationship with
C. the popular definition of the word, numerical and algebraic relationships, both irrelevant to
D. what is popularly understood of the word—numerical and algebraic relationships—has little bearing on
E. what most people think about—numerical and algebraic relationships—are irrelevant to

_________________

Thanks!
Do give some kudos.

Simple strategy:
“Once you’ve eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

Want to improve your Score:
GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 1| GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 2 | How to Improve GMAT Quant from Q49 to a Perfect Q51

My Notes:
Reading comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Absolute Phrases | Subjunctive Mood

Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 30 Dec 2016
Posts: 232
GMAT 1: 650 Q42 V37
GPA: 4
WE: Business Development (Other)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Sep 2018, 19:50
for me it was b/w B and D

B. what the word means for most people, numerical and algebraic relationships, do not have a relationship with
IMO changes the meaning by saying what the word means for most people. Also means to should have been correct here.

D. what is popularly understood of the word—numerical and algebraic relationships—has little bearing on
Correct.

_________________

Regards
SandySilva


____________
Please appreciate the efforts by pressing +1 KUDOS (:

SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 23 Sep 2015
Posts: 1355
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Sep 2018, 00:06

Official Explanation


A question about mathematics, a topic near and dear to Mike’s heart! The answer choices are very different, so each needs to be analyzed separately.

Choice (A): if the word “which” refers to “numerical and algebraic relationships,” then it’s plural and requires a plural verb, so the singular verbs “is” and “doesn’t” present SVA errors. Also, the construction “doesn’t have a relationship with” is very casual and sloppy: this would not appear in formal academic writing. For a variety of reasons, this choice is incorrect.

Choice (B): here, a clause is a subject of a verb. In general, a clause is construed as a singular subject. Here, the clause “what the word means for most people” is singular, but there’s a plural verb: another SVA error. This too has the unfortunately “have a relationship with” construction. For multiple reasons, this choice is incorrect.

Choice (C): this construction lacks a verb, so what follows the colon is not an independent clause. This is tricky. What follows a colon can simply be a noun or a noun-phrase if we are giving examples or providing an identity.

“... chamber music: string quartets, piano trios, and so forth.”

“... the second-largest country on Earth: Canada.”

Here, what immediately precedes the colon is the phrase “generally accepted definition.” What follows the clause is not going to be an example of this, because the first part says it doesn’t exist.

What we need here is additional clarification, precisely because the fact stated in the first part of the sentence may seems surprising to some people. For this, we need an explanation, and an explanation requires a full clause after the colon.

Thus, we need a full clause, and this choice commits the famous missing verb mistake. This choice is incorrect.

Choice (D): this version is elegant and sophisticated. It correctly sets off the examples in double em-dashes. The phrase “has little bearing on” is a very sophisticated phrase. This entire choice is problem-free.

Choice (E): the phrase “what most people think about” is colloquial and logically imprecise. Do most people out there think about numerical and algebraic relationships?? Furthermore, as a subject, this clause should be construed as singular, but it has a plural verb “are”—another SVA error. This choice is incorrect.

The only possible choice is (D).
_________________

Thanks!
Do give some kudos.

Simple strategy:
“Once you’ve eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

Want to improve your Score:
GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 1| GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 2 | How to Improve GMAT Quant from Q49 to a Perfect Q51

My Notes:
Reading comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Absolute Phrases | Subjunctive Mood

GMAT Club Bot
Re: The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition &nbs [#permalink] 17 Sep 2018, 00:06
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The word “mathematics” has no generally accepted definition

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.