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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer,

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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2017, 22:08
IMO
no need of both hence eliminate A,B and E
option C does n't make a complete sense.
So D

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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2017, 06:27
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the
stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart
from the mainstream jazz repertory.

A. Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
What is “both” doing here ?
‘The body of work” can be rooted both in X and Y, where X and Y has to be parallel. However, here X and Y are NOT parallel.

B. Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
Same error as A

C. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
Run on sentence : No main verb in this sentence.

D. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
Correct

E. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both
Again, same error as A
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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2017, 20:05
Hi Experts GMATNinja mikemcgarry

GMAT Qs are a bit funny sometimes, except that they cost a lot!!
Do we not actually need a BOTH after verb-ed modifier - rooted?
None of sentences have below format:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work
rooted both in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and in Duke
Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.
But this too sound incorrect too me.

OA simply eliminates usage of
BOTH if BOTH in not used in correct idiom as : BOTH x and y (x and y: noun phrases)
Any views on the same?
WR, Arpit
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2017, 14:02
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Just with the knowledge of the STRICT PARALLEL RULE of "both x and y" we know that A, B, and E are incorrect. X and Y have to be in the same form.

My reasoning of why C is incorrect.
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted

Lets look at it as a complete sentence: Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yetin many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory. -- "who produced a body of work rooted tin the stride..." is correctly modifying Thelonius. HOWEVER, this is a descriptive phrase and DPs are not necessary they are "fluff" and if eliminated the WHOLE sentence must make sense.

So when we eliminate it we get this sentence: Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertor. --See why it doesn't make sense? this is a comparison In order to be correct the first phrase must say something that is parallel to "yet (fluff) he stood..."


(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted

Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory. <-- correct comparison.

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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2017, 18:33
adkikani wrote:
Hi Experts GMATNinja mikemcgarry

GMAT Qs are a bit funny sometimes, except that they cost a lot!!
Do we not actually need a BOTH after verb-ed modifier - rooted?
None of sentences have below format:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work
rooted both in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and in Duke
Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.
But this too sound incorrect too me.

OA simply eliminates usage of
BOTH if BOTH in not used in correct idiom as : BOTH x and y (x and y: noun phrases)
Any views on the same?
WR, Arpit



Hello adkikani /Arpit.

I will be glad to help you with your doubt. :-)

Just because both is used in the original sentence, it is not necessary that this word must be present in the correct answer too.

You must first understand why a word has been used in the sentence. Does its usage convey logical meaning? If not, then we should figure out how it can be used correctly in the sentence. However, if an answer choice is logically and grammatically correct even without the usage of that particular word, then also the choice will qualify as the correct answer choice.

Same is the case with Choice D of this official sentence.

However, we can use both in the following way in this official sentence:

Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted in the stride-piano tradition of both Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

In the above-mentioned sentence, usage of both X and Y is grammatical as well as logical.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 03:19
valepm wrote:
Just with the knowledge of the STRICT PARALLEL RULE of "both x and y" we know that A, B, and E are incorrect. X and Y have to be in the same form.

My reasoning of why C is incorrect.
(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted

Lets look at it as a complete sentence: Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yetin many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory. -- "who produced a body of work rooted tin the stride..." is correctly modifying Thelonius. HOWEVER, this is a descriptive phrase and DPs are not necessary they are "fluff" and if eliminated the WHOLE sentence must make sense.

So when we eliminate it we get this sentence: Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertor. --See why it doesn't make sense? this is a comparison In order to be correct the first phrase must say something that is parallel to "yet (fluff) he stood..."


(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted

Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory. <-- correct comparison.


Hello valepm,


You have presented your analysis with the right thought-process. So kudos for that. :-)

Just adding my two cents. The sentence presents contrast evident by the usage of the word yet.

It is true that Choice C fails to present the intended contrast because there is no verb associated with the subject Thelonious Monk. So yes, Choice C has a missing verb for the subject.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 21:48
IN CHOICE C,D AND E, ISNT THERE A CONFUSION IF A JAZZ PIANIST ( 1 ENTITY ) AND A COMPOSER ( ANOTHER ENTITY ) ?

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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2017, 09:59
circkit wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

A. Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
B. Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
C. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
D. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
E. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both


The answer is D

The options are very interesting , so lets analyse each of the options .

A use of both in this option is troublesome as there is only one tradition i.e the stride-piano tradition .

It seems to suggest there are two tradition one of Willie (The Lion) Smith and the other of Duke Ellington .Also we need that to make it more formal .

B Again we have troublesome both

C This option has meaning error , it seems to suggest that Thelonious Monk was rooted because of the relative pronoun who

D correct

E Is wrong what was rooted Thelonious Monk or work , use of both is wrong
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2017, 08:51
circkit wrote:
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

A. Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
B. Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
C. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
D. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
E. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both



A- Wrong idiom usage. Both rooted.....and Duke Ellington. Makes no sense. it should be Both X & Y..( Both past participle & Noun). Wrong
B- Wrong idiom. ( Both -- Preposition--- & Noun) Should follow by a preposition to be correct.
C- Has no verb
D- Correct
E- Same error as B.

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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2017, 17:50
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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

A. Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted
B. Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both
C. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted
D. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted
E. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both


CHOICE A: There is nothing technically incorrect with the first 9 words of this sentence, but in general, you should prioritize ACTION VERBS such as "produced" and "stood apart" to VERBS OF BEING / LINKING VERBS such as "was," because verbs of being can often be skipped altogether. For example, "I liked the house that was blue" is unnecessary; instead one should say "I liked the blue house." In addition, "jazz pianist and composer" is Monk's title, and as such should be placed immediately next to his name if possible. For example, "Architect Frank Gehry..." is a better sentence opener than "Frank Gehry, the architect, ..." Finally, we should note that the word "both" does not work here, despite the fact that two musicians are mentioned at the end of the sentence. See the explanation of Choice E for more information on this.

CHOICE B: This is better than Choice A because the "who was" is removed, but it has the same problem as does Choice A with regard to the unnecessary separation between the person ("Monk") and his title ("jazz pianist and composer"), as well as the "both" issue explained in the analysis of Choice E.

CHOICE C: This cannot be correct, because the use of the modifier "who," which takes its own verb ("produced") and thus removes the main verb from the first part of the sentence. For example, "My friend, who owns a coffeeshop, yet he still finds time to practice the drums." is incorrect because of the ", who ____ ." In addition, there is no need to put a comma between the main subject of the sentence ("Monk") and its verb ("produced").

CHOICE D: Correct! It properly addresses both the flaws of the Choice A (unnecessary comma between the person and his title, unnecessary verb of being) and is the best choice here, though the "that was" at the end is unnecessary.

CHOICE E: This is a decoy answer that is very close to working (it does improve on Choice D in the omission of "that was"), but if you use the expression "(adjective) both in A and (in) B," then the first part of the expression needs to carry over to the second. It doesn't make sense to write "a body of work rooted both in the stride piano tradition of Willie Smith and Duke Ellington, yet..."--you can't be "rooted in Duke Ellington," because unlike the first example ("rooted in the stride piano tradition"), Duke Ellington is a person and not a musical style--this answer choice is incorrect. Thus, you could consider this to be a parallel structure error, or a faulty comparison.

For example (incorrect): "I am immersed in both the art of teaching math and English, yet I still have much to learn." Just because I wrote "math and English" doesn't mean that the "both" is correct. I am immersed in only one thing in this sentence--the art of teaching, whether or not that art consists of multiple elements (math and English). Hence I should remove the word "both" entirely, or put it before the word "math": "I am immersed in the art of teaching (both) math and English, yet I still have much to learn."

CORRECT VERSION: Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.

PERFECT VERSION: Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.
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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer,   [#permalink] 12 Dec 2017, 17:50

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