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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body

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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2019, 03:55
Both must be parallel in both the arms and should maintain a structure like : Both X and Y
A , B & E violate this rule
C does not have a main verb to perform with the subject .
Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk , who...., yet in many ways he stood...
So D
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2020, 10:03
GMATNinja Thank you for the explaination. I have seen a youtube video that has the question.

I need some clarity with regards to the correct answer choice. Option D starts off by " Jazz Pianist and composer Thelonius Monk" the first time I read the answer choices I though that these are 2 people as per choice D i.e the "Jazz Pianist" and "composer Thelonius Monk". I have seen questions where this kind of strcuture is correct and I thought this was not the intended meaning. And this was the only reason I eliminated C, D and E. And was figuring out the right answer between choices A and B.

I do understand why the rest of the answer choices are incorrect but I would like to know where is my understanding not correct.

Thank you.
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2020, 14:22
2. errors
(1) easiest the both is uncesseary, since the phrase "body of work rooted A,B" would be sound - so eliminate A,B & E
(2) the big structure of this sentence is Thelonious Monk - (1) verb> produced and (2) verb>stood a part
Option C makes the verb "produced" within a preposiotional phrase and this verb no longer works as working verb-

Therefore the only option left is D
:)
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Feb 2020, 19:30
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sonalchhajed2019 wrote:
GMATNinja Thank you for the explaination. I have seen a youtube video that has the question.

I need some clarity with regards to the correct answer choice. Option D starts off by " Jazz Pianist and composer Thelonius Monk" the first time I read the answer choices I though that these are 2 people as per choice D i.e the "Jazz Pianist" and "composer Thelonius Monk". I have seen questions where this kind of strcuture is correct and I thought this was not the intended meaning. And this was the only reason I eliminated C, D and E. And was figuring out the right answer between choices A and B.

I do understand why the rest of the answer choices are incorrect but I would like to know where is my understanding not correct.

Thank you.

Consider an example in which we really are discussing two different people:

  • A jazz pianist and the composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work.

Our subject consists of two individuals: 1) a jazz pianist and 2) the composer Thelonious Monk. Notice that if we were to rewrite the sentence without the second individual, it would still make perfect sense:

  • A jazz pianist produced a body of work.

Now, if you're wondering whether (D), in fact, refers to two individuals, you could try the same game and drop the 'second' individual to see if it makes sense:

  • Jazz pianist produced a body of work.

That's no good. We need the article "a" if we are talking about a single jazz pianist by himself/herself. Similarly, we would say, "A GMAT tutor can be helpful." instead of "GMAT tutor can be helpful."

Because there's no article in (D), we know that "jazz pianist" describes Thelonious Monk instead of referring to some other person.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2020, 20:51
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted[/u] in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.


(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted (both refers to two different things A & B here it is only one"stride-piano tradition",there is no verb for the main subject and comma is wrong)

(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both (both refers to two different things A & B here it is only one"stride-piano tradition")

(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted (There is no verb for the main subject and comma is wrong)

(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted

(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both (both refers to two different things A & B here it is only one"stride-piano tradition")
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2020, 21:30
Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington, yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.


(A) Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted

(B) Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both

(C) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted

(D) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted

(E) Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both

A. both x and y must have x and y parallel. Here x is in the stride piano.....but y is duke elington. Does not work.
B. Same as A. Both x and y does not work.
C. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk does not have a verb.
D. Correct. This one has let go off Both x and y.
E. Both x and y does not work again.
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2020, 00:29
Isn't (D), also showing that there are 2 subjects "Jazz pianist" and "Thelonious Monk"?
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Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2020, 02:43
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lakshya14 wrote:
Isn't (D), also showing that there are 2 subjects "Jazz pianist" and "Thelonious Monk"?

Hello, lakshya14. In (D), jazz pianist is no more a subject than composer. Both are being used as adjectives in a restrictive appositive phrase, as in, The one and only jazz pianist and composer known as Thelonious Monk... The only option that does not employ such an appositive phrase is (A), which opts for a who clause to convey the same information.

If you have further questions, feel free to ask.

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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2020, 03:35
daagh wrote:
The problem in A is the unnecessary intrusion of the word ‘both’; you can not say, 'a body of work" and then ‘both’ ‘‘Both’ has no plural referent.

In B and E, ‘both’ is misleading because there are no two traditions. There is only one tradition, i.e. the stride piano tradition.
In C there are two subjects to the main clause namely, Thelonious Monk and he. The second subject ‘he’ is redundant.
D is the correct choice with a proper contrasting and coordinating conjunction 'yet' that joins the two arms of this compound sentence and with the nosey word ‘both’ having been dropped



Dear daagh,

Thank you for your explanation, i just have one query for D

Why dont we have a 'comma' in D before "Thelonious Monk"

IMO correct construction should be

A jazz pianist and composer, Thelonious Monk

and not

Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2020, 22:58
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RAHUL_GMAT This is a fairly common construction used to tell the reader who a person is. Our point is not that he did these specific things just because he is a jazz composer. Rather, the author is just adding some context for those unfortunate people who haven't had the pleasure of learning about Thelonious Monk yet. In similar fashion, we might say "Hollywood legend Tom Hanks" or "former UK prime minister Theresa May."
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2020, 23:23
daagh wrote:
I think we should take note an important issue here. The word ‘both’ is the spoilsport in the original text. What does ‘both’ refer to? When we say both, we mean both x and Y. However, there is only one factor here that ------ Monk produced a body of work rooted in the stride-piano tradition of Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington. Note that sibular phrase ‘a body of work’. So using ‘both’ before rooted has no relevance.

2. Can ‘rooted both’ be right? If there are two traditions in the context, it is understandable. However, here is only one tradition i.e. ‘the stride-piano tradition’ which belongs to the two gentlemen noted there.

Therefore, all choices using both in any of the contexts are wrong here. This leaves us only with C and D. Between them, C is an oitright fragment because of the intrusion of the pronoun “who”. Hence D.

3. A note on whether you really have to say ‘was rooted”. Here ‘a body of work rooted’ does not mean that the verb rooted is in active voice. It is actually a past participle, essentially conveying a passive voice such as ‘is rooted/ are rooted/ was rooted / were rooted etc’ depending on the context. Hence, the voice of the verb is out of scope here. In fact, D will still be right answer, even if you drop, the auxiliary verb ‘was’ before rooted.


Hi Daagh,

How would option D look like if we have to convey two different people as in jazz pianist(1st person) and composer Monk(2nd person)?
I marked it wrong because it felt it gave the ambigyity of 1 person or 2 people.
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2020, 11:52
GMATNinja wrote:
This is one of my favorites, just because I see a lot of errors on it – but it’s actually really straightforward, and is easy to solve if you follow a couple of simple rules. And that doesn’t happen as often as we’d like on GMAT SC, unfortunately.

Quote:
A. Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work both rooted

OK, the thing that should jump out at us is the word “both.” In this case, “both” is paired with the word “and” – and this is a very strict parallelism “trigger”. The word “both” and the word “and” must be followed by two parallel elements.

And in this case, we don’t have those parallel elements: “…both rooted… and Duke Ellington…” Nope: “rooted” is an adjective in this situation, and “Duke Ellington” definitely is not. So we can eliminate (A).

(And for anybody who was paying extremely close attention in our YouTube webinar on parallelism and meaning: when I mentioned “special parallel triggers”, this both/and construction is one of the most important examples I had in mind.)

Quote:
B. Thelonious Monk, the jazz pianist and composer, produced a body of work that was rooted both

I’m OK with the use of “that” here: “that was rooted” just modifies the “body of work.” You could probably argue that the words “that was” aren’t strictly necessary, but they also aren’t doing any harm at all.

The more important thing is the parallelism again: “…both in the stride-piano tradition… and Duke Ellington…”

Nope, that’s definitely not parallel, either. (B) is out.

Quote:
C. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, who produced a body of work rooted

Hm, no more “both”! That’s cool. Now the parallelism isn’t a problem at all: Willie (The Lion) Smith and Duke Ellington are parallel to each other in the non-underlined portion.

But now there’s a more subtle problem: this thing isn’t a legitimate sentence anymore, because the presumed subject of the sentence (“Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk”) never actually “performs” a main verb. I think we can agree that the part beginning with “who” is just modifying Thelonious Monk, so let’s strip that out for just a moment to see what we have: “Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk,… yet in many ways he stood apart from the mainstream jazz repertory.”

Huh? That makes no sense. Basically, the sentence is structured as a noun, followed by a modifier, followed by a dependent clause. That’s not a sentence. So (C) is out.

Quote:
D. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work that was rooted

As in (C), we don’t have any parallelism issues here, since “both” has been removed. But unlike (C), (D) is actually a real sentence, since it starts with a nice, independent clause: “…Thelonious Monk produced a body of work…”

So let’s keep (D).

Quote:
E. Jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk produced a body of work rooted both

And we’re right back to the same parallelism problem as in (B): “…both in the stride-piano tradition… and Duke Ellington…” That’s just plain wrong, and we’re left with (D) as the correct answer.



Detailed explanation and easy to understand. Thank you
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Re: Thelonious Monk, who was a jazz pianist and composer, produced a body   [#permalink] 15 Jun 2020, 11:52

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