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There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle

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There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 29 Aug 2018, 09:05
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There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle: it is an indivisible shard of matter, without internal structure and without detectable shape or size. One might expect commensurate simplicity in the theories that describe such particles and the forces through which they interact; at the least, one might expect the structure of the world to be explained with a minimum number of particles and forces. Judged by this criterion of parsimony, a description of nature that has evolved in the past several years can be accounted a reasonable success. Matter is built out of just two elementary particles: the classes leptons, such as electrons, and the quarks, which make up protons, neutrons, and many related particles. Four basic forces act between the elementary particles. Gravitation and electromagnetism have long been familiar in the macroscopic world; the weak force and the strong force are observed only in subnuclear events.

An understanding of nature at this level is a remarkable achievement; nevertheless, it is possible to imagine what an even simpler theory might be like. Ideally, the two classes of elementary particles would be collapsed into one. Similarly, one force, rather than four, might explain all the particles' interactions. An ambitious new theory now promises at least a partial unification along these lines. The theory does not embrace gravitation, which is by far the feeblest of the forces and may be fundamentally different from the others. If gravitation is excluded, however, the theory unifies all elementary particles and forces.

The first step in constructing the unified theory was demonstrating that the weak, the strong, and the electromagnetic forces could all be described by theories of the same general type. During this development, a deep connection was discovered between the weak force and electromagnetism, a connection that hinted at still grander synthesis. The new theory incorporated the leptons and the quarks into a single family and showed that one type of particle can transform into the other. At the same time the weak, the strong, and the electromagnetic forces are understood as aspects of a single underlying force. Thus, the theory is a model of frugality.

1. The author organizes the passage by

A) enumerating distinctions among several different kinds of elementary particles
B) stating a criterion for judging theories of nature, and using it to evaluate two theories
C) explaining three methods of grouping particles and forces
D) criticizing an inaccurate view of elemental nature and proposing an alternative approach
E) outlining an assumption about scientific verification, then criticizing the assumption



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Originally posted by daboo343 on 04 Jun 2017, 08:26.
Last edited by workout on 29 Aug 2018, 09:05, edited 1 time in total.
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There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 10:27
Answered this question in 2 min and 40 seconds.

It is B.
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Re: There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2018, 08:48
Hi workout

Please reformat the passage.

Thanks!
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Re: There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2018, 20:40
An RC passage should have more questions to practice else it doesn't make sense to read the passage and answer the question.It becomes CR question rather than RC passage.
Re: There can be nothing simpler than an elementary particle &nbs [#permalink] 29 Aug 2018, 20:40
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