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There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t

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New post 17 Oct 2008, 17:58
A and C are out because of usage of smaller.
B compares committment with parents and grandparents.
E is wordy and awkward
D is the best choice
amitdgr wrote:
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There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe that young people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the "work ethic."

(A) a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(C) a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and grandparents
(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had
(E) a lessening of the commitment to work and a career that their parents and grandparents had
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New post 19 Oct 2008, 07:05
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OA (D)

To maintain parallelism, HAD is required. The comparison is done between the commitment that young generation HAVE and older generation HAD.

Hope it makes sense....
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New post 19 Oct 2008, 08:44
amitdgr wrote:
Source: GMATPrep

There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe that young people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the "work ethic."

(A) a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
(C) a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and grandparents
(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had
(E) a lessening of the commitment to work and a career that their parents and grandparents had


IMO D) ... less of is required here since commitment is uncountable and verb is required in end
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New post 11 Oct 2009, 09:00
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Please help me with this SC...
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New post 11 Oct 2009, 09:13
commitment is uncountable, thus we need to use "less" here.
answer E looks confusing and awkward.
We need to choose btw B and D.
B has no tense.
because it is required to have a clear tense here to make this sentence sound clear, pick D.
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New post 23 Aug 2010, 17:52
We can rule out A,B and C since had is not there in the end for completing the parallelism.

have ... and ... had

now between D and E,

E has "lessening" which means commitment keeps on decreasing
so E out

so D wins , as have less of a commitment ... is parallel to .... had
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New post 24 Aug 2010, 17:44
noboru wrote:
There is a widespread belief in the US and Western Europe that young
people have a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and
grandparents
and that the source of the change lies in the collapse of the 'work
ethic'.

A. a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
B. less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
C. a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and
grandparents
D. less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
had
E. a lessening of the commitment to work and a career than their parents and
grandparents had


commitment is uncountable noun so it should be less not smaller. Lessening of commitment is wrong. So ruling out A,C and E
In B we are comparing commitment with parents and grandparents.

D is correct as it uses less and also compares commitment of young people with the commitment of their parents and grandparents
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New post 25 Aug 2010, 09:03
Ans. should be D.

less commitment or more commitment not smaller or bigger commitment, so A and C out.
B out because of improper comparison
E out because of lessening.
D is the answer
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New post 31 Aug 2010, 10:34
Seen this on the forum before....

Commitment cannot be "smaller", eliminate
A. a smaller commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
C. a smaller commitment to work and a career than that of their parents and
grandparents

"Lessening of" is incorrect, eliminate
E. a lessening of the commitment to work and a career than their parents and
grandparents had

Parallelism between young people HAVE and grandparents HAD, eliminate
B. less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents

D it is!
D. less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents
had
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New post 10 Sep 2010, 12:25
Dont you think that "had" is so obvious that is not actually needed?
Wouldnt B therefore be better?
Thanks.
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Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2010, 16:42
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Commitment is uncountable and hence small cannot be used. hence A and C is ruled out.
B is ruled out because the comparison is between the commitment towards work and not between children and their parents.
E is ruled out because the word Lessening is used in a wrong context.
Hence D is the correct answer
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New post 16 Dec 2010, 16:27
OA = D "Less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had.
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New post 20 Dec 2010, 20:49
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People have danced around this issue here, but let's make it explicit:

"Smaller" and "larger" refer to physical size:

My dog is larger...
Your foot is smaller...
His house is smaller...

Since there is no physical size of "commitment," you really can't use "smaller" or "larger" to describe it.

"Less" and "more" can refer to magnitude:

I am less excited than you are.
You are more committed than I am.

Good times in GMAT land!
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Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2011, 05:32
BKimball wrote:
People have danced around this issue here, but let's make it explicit:

"Smaller" and "larger" refer to physical size:

My dog is larger...
Your foot is smaller...
His house is smaller...

Since there is no physical size of "commitment," you really can't use "smaller" or "larger" to describe it.

"Less" and "more" can refer to magnitude:

I am less excited than you are.
You are more committed than I am.

Good times in GMAT land!


Many thanks.

Could you explain whether "had" is strictly required?

Thanks in advance. For me is so obvious that can be ommited. I think that it is called ellipsis.
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New post 02 Jan 2011, 06:46
Young people HAVE less of x.... than their parents and grandparents HAD

If 'had' is not added then I think quite literally the comparison does not work...

Young ppl have less of something (i.e., a category of persons having something) vs. their parents and grandparents (a category of persons simpliciter)

"ellipsis" as far as I am aware refers to omission of words when you quote someone and put ....... dots to lessen the length of the quote...

one place where a word can be omitted (according to the MGMAT SC book) is a word after a possessive noun

Sam's build is more muscular than Joe's. [one doesnt have to write Joe's build as that is implicit]
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New post 02 Jan 2011, 13:24
My point is that "had" is also implicit in this question.
Thoughts on that?
Thanks in advance.

gmat1011 wrote:
Young people HAVE less of x.... than their parents and grandparents HAD

If 'had' is not added then I think quite literally the comparison does not work...

Young ppl have less of something (i.e., a category of persons having something) vs. their parents and grandparents (a category of persons simpliciter)

"ellipsis" as far as I am aware refers to omission of words when you quote someone and put ....... dots to lessen the length of the quote...

one place where a word can be omitted (according to the MGMAT SC book) is a word after a possessive noun

Sam's build is more muscular than Joe's. [one doesnt have to write Joe's build as that is implicit]

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Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jan 2011, 18:44
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noboru,

Great question! As codesnooker describes, this question really deals with comparisons. Remember that comparisons are just a special form of parallelism, so the items that you are comparing must be parallel.

Consider this example:

"I ate more pizza than you."
"I ate more pizza than you did."

Here, we are trying to compare the relative quantities of pizza eaten by you and I. However, the first example doesn't do that; the first example says that I ate more pizza than "you" (as if "you" is something else than I ate -- apparently less of").

You could say "I ate more pizza than salad" if you are trying to compare the nouns "pizza" and "salad." However, when you are comparing how much pizza I ATE to how much pizza YOU ATE, you need to keep that noun, verb structure parallel by using the noun (you) and the verb (did) in the second half just as you used the noun (I) and verb (ate) in the first half.

Check out codesnooker's explanation for how this works in this problem.

Brett
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Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2011, 05:34
I agree with your pizza example because in that case (I ate more pizza than you), there is ambiguity:
Meaning 1: I ate 4 slices and you only ate 2 slices.
Meaning 2: I ate 4 kgs of pizza and only 2 kgs of you (yes, I love you with tomatos and fries).

However, in this question I dont see where is the ambiguity. I would appreciate if you could explain the 2 possible meanings of the sentence if there were no "had" removing the supposed ambiguity that I am trying to discover.

Many thanks in advance.

BKimball wrote:
noboru,

Great question! As codesnooker describes, this question really deals with comparisons. Remember that comparisons are just a special form of parallelism, so the items that you are comparing must be parallel.

Consider this example:

"I ate more pizza than you."
"I ate more pizza than you did."

Here, we are trying to compare the relative quantities of pizza eaten by you and I. However, the first example doesn't do that; the first example says that I ate more pizza than "you" (as if "you" is something else than I ate -- apparently less of").

You could say "I ate more pizza than salad" if you are trying to compare the nouns "pizza" and "salad." However, when you are comparing how much pizza I ATE to how much pizza YOU ATE, you need to keep that noun, verb structure parallel by using the noun (you) and the verb (did) in the second half just as you used the noun (I) and verb (ate) in the first half.

Check out codesnooker's explanation for how this works in this problem.

Brett

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Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2011, 19:01
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Try this out:

(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents: Here, they are less committed to work and career than to their parents and grandparents. That's not the intended meaning.

(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had. Here, they are less committed to work than their parents and grandparents were. That makes more sense in context.

Does that help?

Brett
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Re: There is a widespread belief in the United States and Western Europe t  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2011, 10:06
BKimball wrote:
Try this out:

(B) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents: Here, they are less committed to work and career than to their parents and grandparents. That's not the intended meaning.

(D) less of a commitment to work and a career than their parents and grandparents had. Here, they are less committed to work than their parents and grandparents were. That makes more sense in context.

Does that help?

Brett

ah!ok! commited to their parents! that was the meaning I was not catching!

Thanks. That helped.
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