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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an

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New post 24 Dec 2012, 03:56
C] the beetle maintains fixed time interval b/w pauses---this helps us to think that beetle is not tried, otherwise the frequency or duration of pauses would increase,this will weaken the tiredness hypothesis

, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.---may be this points out to the fact that beetle can increase it speed ONLY after it has adjusted the visual filed ie after its next pause. this will strengthen the eye problem hypothesis

more thoughts please
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New post 24 Dec 2012, 04:22
dentobizz wrote:
C] the beetle maintains fixed time interval b/w pauses---this helps us to think that beetle is not tried, otherwise the frequency or duration of pauses would increase,this will weaken the tiredness hypothesis

, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.---may be this points out to the fact that beetle can increase it speed ONLY after it has adjusted the visual filed ie after its next pause. this will strengthen the eye problem hypothesis

more thoughts please


C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary
begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

Let us analyze the problem in greater detail

What are the factors given in the question that affect the rest theory ?

1. Speed. Greater the speed more the need for rest
2. Time. More time chasing more the need for rest

What are the factors given in the question that affect the visual information theory?

1. Speed. Greater the speed more difficult to process visual information
2. Change in direction of the insect. Makes difficult the processing of visual information.

Let us now analyze choice C.

That the beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses says that the time factor doesn't affect them. So the rest theory is weakened and the second part although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause. says that the beetle which is stationary and then starts to move cannot initially move at the normal speed because it has to process visual information at a markedly higher rate.

I very much agree with dentobizz's explanation.

A very difficult problem but I would still say not totally free of flaws.
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to avoid all the heavy and convoluted reasoning one could solve this problem by eliminating wrong options.A E and D can be ruled out easily.If you can eliminate B by the incline logic.then ur only left with C.Job done!

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New post 03 Jan 2013, 22:14
Hi ,
Just to get a closure on this question ,there is the explanation given by Ron regarding this cr problem.

"the problem with choice (b) is that it works against both hypotheses.
* the "immediate response" part works against the blindness hypothesis. (if the beetles went blind while running, they wouldn't change direction until they paised to regain their eyesight.)
* the "pausing equally often up or down an incline" part works against the moment's rest hypothesis. (it's harder to run up an incline than to run down one. so, according to the "they get tired" hypothesis, the beetle should have to stop more often if it's running up an incline.)

choice (c) is the one you want.
* the beetle reacts after it pauses, thus supporting the idea that it's blind (and so unable to react) until it pauses. (i.e., the increase in speed is not immediate; the beetle doesn't know that it's supposed to run faster until it has stopped and looked.)
* according to this information, the rest interval between pauses is fixed. note that this is true even when the beetle runs faster, as described -- an observation that undermines the "moment's rest" hypothesis. (according to the "beetle gets tired" hypothesis, the beetle should have to stop after less time if it's running faster.)

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New post 04 Jan 2013, 08:46
OA of the original question here is C.
Guys, again mentioning, there is another question from GMAT prep with the same stimulus but different answer choices and answer to that question was B. Here the choices are indeed very different.
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New post 07 Jan 2013, 21:00
The problem for the beetle seems to be at the start of the chase , with regard to speed. So when after being stationary it starts moving there is an abrupt change in visual information which it is not able to process properly and results in lower speed. The difference between being stationary and the pauses is that in the latter it is still processing the previous information and as that happens in a moment it starts chasing again and there is a sort of continuity and not an abrupt change in the visual information even after the pause. So it can move at a higher speed after the first pause.
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New post 07 Jan 2013, 21:55
can you please provide a definitive answer to the question?
Is the question wrong?

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New post 07 Jan 2013, 23:12
@rohantiwari pls see the posts above the OA is 'C' and this is a Official gmatprep question so it can't be wrong. Hope its clear

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New post 08 Jan 2013, 01:24
Marcab wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running
toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they
cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while
running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go
blind and stop. Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey
insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?
A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and
runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and
pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary
begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop
immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

OA
[Reveal] Spoiler:
soon


Though the same stimulus is available with different answer choices, I found this one to be a tough one. Explanations will be appreciated.


The first part of choice C says that the beetles maintain fixed time interval between pauses. So irrespective of how different the variations may be in the visual information between pauses, the vision is maintained in that interval. So it doesn't seem logical that the beetle wouldn't be able to see an insect that has been stationary which then starts to flee. There would be no need to increase the speed after the next pause. In my view C doesn't directly support the visual theory. "Although,... the beetle increases its speed" in the second part can at best be used as an additional support to undermine the rest theory.

Looks like it is a messed up question.
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New post 09 Jan 2013, 15:18
wannahh wrote:
"they can capture virtually any nonflying insect."

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary
begins to flee
, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

is'nt C against the premise above?


well, the fact that the beetle increased its speed to capture a running insect doesn't mean it cannot capture it. It could well be the case that beetles can capture the insect (we don't whether it is flying or nonflying insect) after the chase.
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New post 18 Feb 2013, 22:58
I see that there are two versions of this question going around with a slight variation in answer choices that affects the correct answer. I will focus on the two contentious answer choices only in each of the two versions of this question.

Version# 1 (GMAT Prep)

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. - INCORRECT

A sudden change in insect direction is a big visual change. If the beetle were to require pauses/rest to adapt to rapidly changing visual information (Hypothesis# 2), then this hypothesis is undermined by the "immediate response" to change in insect direction, as mentioned in the first part of answer choice.
The inclined path is mentioned deliberately in the second part of this answer choice to help evaluate the first hypothesis that the beetle needs rest or break due to tiredness. Going up an incline always needs more muscular effort (read 'tiredness') to support component of body weight (remember 'mg sin theta' acting against the direction of motion), which implies more tiredness and resultant need for more frequent stops compared to going down an incline ('mg sin theta' acting in the direction of motion). Since this answer choice mentions that the beetle pauses equally frequently when going up or down the incline, even the first hypothesis is undermined.


C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause. - CORRECT

Imagine a stationary insect really far away (lets exaggerate to 1 KM) that a beetle has somehow spotted and started to begin its attack by moving towards it. For the first 800 m, the insect has no idea that the beetle is reaching for it. For these 800 metres, the beetle is able to move linearly towards its target insect in intervals of 100m before it exhausts itself COMPLETELY and HAS TO take a rest. The timing of the rest is crucial to understanding this answer choice. One can argue that according to hypothesis 1 ('tiredness'), the beetle is able to rest long enough (exaggerate to 1 hour) after every 100m of run to fully recover its breath and energy, and start afresh for the next 100m. But this is not the case here, because otherwise during the last 200m of its attack (when the insect somehow discovers that it is being preyed and starts to flee), the beetle would not be able to run remaining 2x 100 m with any higher speed than what it had in all the first 8x 100m (remember we said the beetle exhausts itself completely in each of those 100m). The only plausible explanation is that tiredness is not a factor, and the beetle was stopping after every 100m for visual correction (can be safely assumed to take a 'fixed time'). This answer choice thus undermines one hypothesis (tiredness) over the other (visual correction).

I will respond to the other version of this question from OG later.

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New post 01 Jul 2013, 03:16
stunn3r wrote:
Some expert please chime in.

I think its C. I know I am questioning a OG question but B just doesn't look as right as C.


Lets analyze C:

(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction (so it sees the prey), and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline (so it does not stop to rest, since it stops equally frequently in both cases).

C weakens both theories.

Hope it's clear
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windofchange wrote:
This question is from OG12 - Diagnostic Verbal 25
OA is B.
I don't understand why C is wrong. Could anyone explain?
Thanks in advance.



The correct answer choice should conclusively determine either of the following two hypothesis behind the intermittent stopping of the beetle -
1) It gets tired while approaching the insects
2) It loses its vision because it moves too fast near the insect ( in other words, its brain is not able to image properly the rapidly changing vision).

As far as option C is concerned, it tells two things -


C) In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.



The part -
-- the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction - This makes it clear that the beetle doesn't go blind , else it wouldn't have been possible for it to respond to changes in inside direction.

While the second part -
-- pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline - This makes it obvious that the direction of incline has no bearing over the intervals of pause. If it were about beetle getting tired, the frequency of stops would have increased when the chase was up the incline.

Hence, C can't be the answer.

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This is an odd variation of the famous tiger beetles question discussed here:

tiger-beetles-are-such-fast-runners-that-they-can-capture-virtually-25607.html?fl=similar
tiger-beetles-are-such-fast-runners-that-they-can-capture-48925.html

I find the question a little confusing, but I can sort of understand why (C) is the OA:

"(C) The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between the pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause"

This choice rules out the possibility of the first hypothesis "Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment’s rest", and indirectly supports the second hypothesis by implying that, since the beetle was able to increase its speed during the second run, it was not actually blind.

Awaiting further discussion.

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This question has already been discussed extensively here... Please do a quick search before posting questions... :)
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect.
However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack.
Theory1: Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest;
Theory2: while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
(Does not fit as insect is moving towards the beetle. OFS)

D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
Ending a pursuit is neither mentioned nor favorable to any one of the thesis.

E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.
(Response to suddenly introduced obstacles is out of scope.)

I got struck between B and C.

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
(I chose B as I felt it pauses because of its visual blurr)

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
(This supports the first theory but how can think we that the beetle increases its speed after its next pause. )

can someone explain why B is wrong and C is right?
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Mechmeera wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect.
However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack.
Theory1: Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest;
Theory2: while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.


can someone explain why B is wrong and C is right?


Hi,
I would like to add my 2 cents,

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
- The beetle changes its direction readily in pursuing a moving insect: what we get from this? Probably Tiger Beetles (TB) got GOOD vision. Theory 2 ruled out. Fine. They pause equally frequently no matter chasing up or down. Conclusion? Maintaining pace is NO big deal. Going down definitely gives TB more pace than going up. Theory 2 also gone. But we got undermine any one of the theories. ELIMINATE.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
- fixed time interval between pauses - this part supports that TB actually can't maintain too much pace(supports Theory 1). As if, TB got to stop after attaining X miles/hr speed. TB increases its speed as stationary insect begins to flee - TB has a great vision(Theory 2 undermined). C seems GOOD.

I think its a fairly lengthy CR in terms of amount of thinking involved, a fact that the author utilized in devising a trick answer choice B, which is a great choice except for its undermining both the theories. :wink:

Binit.

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Re: #Top150 CR: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2016, 13:18
THE TWO THEORIES ARE
1. BEETLES' STOPS ARE BCOS THEY GET TIRED AND REST.
2. BEETLES' STOPS ARE DUE TO BLINDNESS RESULTING FROM QUICK VISUALS.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?
LET'S POE THIS
A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent. stopping. THIS SHOWS THAT THE QUICK VISUAL DOESN'T BLIND THEM AFTERALL. UNDERMINES 2. WHY DIDN'T IT GET TIRED NOW? UNDERMINES 1 AS WELL.

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline. UNDERMINES 2 BCOS IF THEY RESPOND IMMEDIATELY TO CHANGE IN INSECTS DIRECTION IT MEANS THEY MIGHT NOT HAVE GOT ANY BLIND. UNDERMINES 1 AS WELL BCOS THEIR PAUSING DOWN THE VALLEY AS MUCH AS THEIR PAUSING UPHILL SUGGESTS NO FATIGUE.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause. UNDERMINES 1 COS EVEN WHEN THEY RUN FASTER AT THE SAME DURATION THEY WOULDN'T EVEN REST MORE. THEIR STOPS AREN'T REST-HUNGRY STOPS. SUPPORTS 2 COS THE BEETLE INCREASES IT'S SPPEED AFTER NEXT STOP NOT SUGGESTING IT DIDN'T EVEN SAY THE CHANGE IN SPEED DURING THE CHANGE BUT AT THE STOP. THE QUICK CHANGE MIGHT HAVE BLINDED AND IT STOPPED TO REGAIN SIGHT. CORRECT!

D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit. SHOWS IT'S TIRED AND BLINDED!

E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

HMM... SUGGESTS IT SEES WELL TO STOP LEST IT HITS SOMETHING. SUGGESTS THE STOP ISN'T COS OF TIREDNEDSS. UNDERMINES BOTH.

CLEAR C!

Kudos [?]: 164 [0], given: 211

Re: #Top150 CR: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture   [#permalink] 24 Feb 2016, 13:18

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