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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2016, 07:11
The answer is an easy peasy B

Explaination :- Like always, it is advisable to break the argument into premise and conclusion.
In this question there will be a minor difference because there will be two conclusions and we have to strengthen one conclusion and completely destroy the other conclusion

Lets break the argument :-
Premise 1) Beetles are fast runner
Premise 2) When chasing an insect, beetle run, stop, then run, then again stop, and then again run and so on....

Conclusion 1 ) When running fast, beetle get tired and cannot maintain the speed. So beetle rests.<=== The beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest (mentioned in the passage)
Conclusion 2) When running fast beetle gets blinds.. stops.. regain the eyeside..and runs again. <==Beetles quickly go blind and stop. (mentioned in passage)

Now lets check what answer choices agrees with one conclusion and disagrees with other conclusion

A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
WRONG-So when beetle is chased by another insect he runs without stopping. He neither gets tired nor go blind. He runs like Usian Bolt. ==>BOTH CONCLUSIONS DESTROYED

B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.
Right- when a insect swerves (changes its direction), beetle also changes its direction. meaning he can see the insect changing direction. So it means beetle does not go blind.. he can see an insect changing its path. SO SECOND CONCLUSION DESTROYED. As the chase takes longer time, beetle rest more and more.. Meaning beetle might get tired more and more and have to rest... FIRST CONCLUSION SUPPORTED.

C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
Wrong:- Beetle respond to insect's direction change meaning beetle can see ..he does not go blind..SECOND CONCLUSION DESTROYED. Beetle takes equal number of pause whenever he is running uphill (more tiresome task.. against gravity) or down (easier to run.. gravity helps) SO FIRST CONCLUSION DESTROYED. getting tired has nothing to do with stopping. There is some other reason. FIRST CONCLUSION DESTROYED. ==>BOTH CONCLUSIONS DESTROYED

D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
Wrong :-Irrelevant.. It shows that beetle is clever. He knows its no use running because he will never catch the insect. But this option talks neither about stopping, nor going blind. SO ITS A USELESS OPTION ==>BOTH CONCLUSIONS INTACT.

E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.
Wrong:- This option is merely a rephrasing of second premises. (Premise 2:- When chasing an insect, beetle run, stop, then run, then again stop, and then again run and so on...) It does not address the conclusions ==> BOTH CONCLUSIONS INTACT.

So we can see that only option B does what the question is asking. Saving one conclusion while destroying the other .. hence B is correct




Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

C In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2016, 01:26
Thank god they didn't place the correct answer choice last. I stopped reading answer choices once I determined that B was correct. Analyzing all 5 answer choices would have been too much work.

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2016, 08:18
Pauline wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

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B vs C

B - says beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction and pause equally frequently. The word usually(Not always) makes it ambiguous that weather beetles always respond or sometimes (may be when they are not running).

C- Clearly states that The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause. - They maintain fixed pauses (which proves one theory given) but as soon as insect is trying to escape, they start running again which means that at the 'pause', their eyes are still working and can locate the insect and they never go blind( Which undermines the second theory)

In the given question we have to prove one theory correct and other wrong. C is the strongest of the options given.

All the best.

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 14 Oct 2016, 10:31
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

Can you please explain the correct answer C here. I have traversed a lot of forums and explanations and I am not able to find a satisfying explanation. Please if you can attend chetan2u

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2016, 18:33
Keats wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

Can you please explain the correct answer C here. I have traversed a lot of forums and explanations and I am not able to find a satisfying explanation. Please if you can attend chetan2u


Hi,
Just read few posts above yours and my understanding of C is slightly different....

C tells us that the beetles pause at regular intervals....
Say it pauses after 10 secs....
When the insect is stationary, it travels at a slower speed say 6m per minute so it travels 1 m and pauses..
Now the insect is fleeing and the beetle increases its speed to say 12m per minute...
Now it travels 2 m in 10 secs and then pauses..

BUT if the beetle was getting tired and taking rest it should have stopped after traveling 1 m in second case too that is after five seconds and not 10 seconds..

So it means the beetle stops to adjust its vision after regular intervals..
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, a tigerbeetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack. Perhaps the beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

Last edited by carcass on 04 Nov 2016, 03:54, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 20 May 2017, 12:56
Suryangshu wrote:
Why C and not B.
B because it shows that the beetles stop in order to maintain their pace, which is the first hypothesis.
Kindly explain why C is OA.


The following post (earlier in the thread) might answer your question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/cr-question- ... ml#p119829
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New post 15 Jun 2017, 08:38
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running
toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they
cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while
running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go
blind and stop.
Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey
insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?


A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and
runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and
pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary
begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop
immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

Could someone provide an explanation for this one.

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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2017, 20:15
leia23 wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running
toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they
cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while
running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go
blind and stop.
Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey
insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?


A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and
runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and
pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary
begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop
immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

Could someone provide an explanation for this one.


Hi,

Going through the thread would provide you with explanations. However, the gist is that one of the hypothesis either needed to be weakened and the other strengthened. Option C elaborately tells us that a fleeing insect induces the beetle to increase its speed right after its scheduled pause. Therefore, it's less likely that the beetle is tired, but more that it need's to be static to better process the information of the insect's flight.

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jun 2017, 09:02
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2017, 10:32
GMATNinja, daagh sir, Can anyone change the OA. I suppose OA should be B not C. It is misleading to many.

Thank you.

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2017, 11:45
I opted choice B, and later saw that it is correct - though the language of the question is too heavy for me to digest in the first reading - could anyone suggest a source from where, I can be more efficient in processing such language quickly...
GMATNinja - Please, any source that you can recommend? It would be a great help.
PS: I am non native, aged, English learner.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 13:17
DAakash7 wrote:
I opted choice B, and later saw that it is correct - though the language of the question is too heavy for me to digest in the first reading - could anyone suggest a source from where, I can be more efficient in processing such language quickly...
GMATNinja - Please, any source that you can recommend? It would be a great help.
PS: I am non native, aged, English learner.

Hi DAakash7, I don't have any "quick fixes", but towards the bottom of the Ultimate RC Guide for Beginners, there is a section called, "Improving your fundamental reading skills". See if those recommendations help (the article also contains links to book and periodical recommendations).

Good luck!
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an   [#permalink] 20 Sep 2017, 13:17

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