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To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard.

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To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2017, 12:56
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

63% (00:53) correct 37% (01:04) wrong based on 254 sessions

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Source: Nova GMAT

To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. If one studies four hours a day for one month, she will score in the ninetieth percentile. Hence, if a person scored in the top ten percent on the GMAT, then she must have studied at least four hours a day for one month.

Which one of the following most accurately describes the weakness in the above argument?

(A) The argument fails to take into account that not all test-prep books recommend studying four hours a day for one month.
(B) The argument does not consider that excessive studying can be counterproduc-tive.
(C) The argument does not consider that some people may be able to score in the ninetieth percentile though they studied less than four hours a day for one month.
(D) The argument fails to distinguish between how much people should study and how much they can study.
(E) The author fails to realize that the ninetieth percentile and the top ten percent do not mean the same thing.

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To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2017, 04:25
SajjadAhmad wrote:
Source: Nova GMAT

To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. If one studies four hours a day for one month, she will score in the ninetieth percentile. Hence, if a person scored in the top ten percent on the GMAT, then she must have studied at least four hours a day for one month.

Which one of the following most accurately describes the weakness in the above argument?

(A) The argument fails to take into account that not all test-prep books recommend studying four hours a day for one month.
(B) The argument does not consider that excessive studying can be counterproduc-tive.
(C) The argument does not consider that some people may be able to score in the ninetieth percentile though they studied less than four hours a day for one month.
(D) The argument fails to distinguish between how much people should study and how much they can study.
(E) The author fails to realize that the ninetieth percentile and the top ten percent do not mean the same thing.


The argument says that to score in the ninetieth percentile, one must study 4 hours/day for 1 month.
If a person scores in the top 10 percentile or the ninetieth percentile, the student must have studied
for four hours or more that entire month.

We need to describe a weakness of the argument.

If the person was good to begin with, he wouldn't need 4 hours a day for an entire month,
but still end up scoring in the ninetieth percentile and this has been clearly explained
in Option C and is our correct answer!
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Re: To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2017, 05:27
Only C and E are the contender.
C weakens the argument perfectly. If someone studies for less than mention period than it will destroy the conclusion.

My doubt is:
Will Option E correct if question is: On what basis argument is most vulnerable to criticism?
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Re: To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2018, 09:46
goalMBA1990 wrote:
Only C and E are the contender.
C weakens the argument perfectly. If someone studies for less than mention period than it will destroy the conclusion.

My doubt is:
Will Option E correct if question is: On what basis argument is most vulnerable to criticism?



this question is an assumption question, and the question you ask is also an assumption question. Therefore, the correct answer is still same; it is C.
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To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2018, 03:11
To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard. If one studies four hours a day for one month, she will score in the ninetieth percentile. Hence, if a person scored in the top ten percent on the GMAT, then she must have studied at least four hours a day for one month.

Which one of the following most accurately describes the weakness in the above argument?
CONCLUSION : To score in the 90th percentile one must study atleast 4 hours per day for a month
We have to weaken the conclusion


(A) The argument fails to take into account that not all test-prep books recommend studying four hours a day for one month.Out of Scope
(B) The argument does not consider that excessive studying can be counterproductive. Out of Scope
(C) The argument does not consider that some people may be able to score in the ninetieth percentile though they studied less than four hours a day for one month. CORRECT as if a person studies for less than 4 hours per day in a month and is still able to score 90th percentile it weakens our conclusion which states that only those who studies atleast 4 hours per day in a month shall be able to be in the top 10 percentile
(D) The argument fails to distinguish between how much people should study and how much they can study.Out of Scope
(E) The author fails to realize that the ninetieth percentile and the top ten percent do not mean the same thing. Incorrect as it does not affects the conclusion
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To score in the ninetieth percentile on the GMAT, one must study hard.   [#permalink] 30 Apr 2018, 03:11
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