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Traditionally, the study of history has had fixed boundaries

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Re: Traditionally, the study of history has had fixed boundaries  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2013, 10:16
shakti751 wrote:
Can any one explain the logic for 26th one? I am getting no clue why the author quoted the word...


14 minutes
Made short notes for the passage.

Answers
A
A
C-- got this wrong
E
C
D
A

The logic for Q 26 as per my understanding : "And it violates the basic tenet of historical method: that historians be alert to the negative instances that would refute their theses. Psychohistorians, convinced of the absolute rightness of their own theories, are also convinced that theirs is the “deepest” explanation of any event, that other "

The way i thought of it as "So as it violates the basic tenet of historical method , it cannot be the deepest explanation"
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Re: Traditionally, the study of history has had fixed boundaries  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2014, 00:12
Quote:
20. Which of the following best states the main point of the passage?
(A) The approach of psychohistorians to historical study is currently in vogue even though it lacks the rigor and verifiability of traditional historical method.


Can somebody explain me how you found support in the passage for option A. 'Lacks rigor and verifiability'??
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New post 18 Feb 2014, 01:48
A
E
C
B
C
E
A
i got 4 correct out of 7
i think it is a good score
made silly mistakes
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Re: Traditionally, the study of history has had fixed boundaries  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2014, 22:35
Took 18 minutes
Got 4 correct, 4 incorrect :(
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New post 22 Jun 2014, 03:52
I strongly feel 23 should be B. Look at the following statements:
" The old questions “What happened?” and “How did it happen?” have given way to the question “Why did it happen?” Prominent among the methods used to answer the question “Why” is psychoanalysis, and its use has given rise to psychohistory."

So "what happened" and "How did it happen?” are clearly conventions governing traditional history.

Kudos to anyone who proves me wrong.
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New post 09 Nov 2015, 23:56
20 mins ; 5 right 2 wrong ; killer killer passage

i got both 2nd and 3rd question wrong ; both inference ;need to practice more
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New post 21 Dec 2015, 08:32
quite a long passage, but was fun ....... got al right!! :) :)
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New post 02 Aug 2018, 23:36
Can someone explain why 21 and 27.
I feel 21 should be E as traditional has a definite boundaries mentioned in the passage
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New post 12 Aug 2018, 01:08
Someone explain Q23. It is given that "Psychohistory does not merely use psychological explanations in historical contexts. Historians have always used such explanations when they were appropriate and when there was sufficient evidence for them". From this we can clearly answer the question in option (c), "When do traditional historians consider psychological explanations of historical developments appropriate?". They find it appropriate when there is sufficient evidence for them.
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Re: Traditionally, the study of history has had fixed boundaries  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2018, 01:16
rishi081992 wrote:
I strongly feel 23 should be B. Look at the following statements:
" The old questions “What happened?” and “How did it happen?” have given way to the question “Why did it happen?” Prominent among the methods used to answer the question “Why” is psychoanalysis, and its use has given rise to psychohistory."

So "what happened" and "How did it happen?” are clearly conventions governing traditional history.

Kudos to anyone who proves me wrong.

The question is asking when, as to the time frame when the conventions were established.
Re: Traditionally, the study of history has had fixed boundaries &nbs [#permalink] 12 Aug 2018, 01:16

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