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Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

(A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
(B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
(C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(D) as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
(E) as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.
'...as the current one.' would be right so we have A, C and D.
'...likely that they will...' is too wordy. A is precise '...likely to...'.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2009, 09:43
barakhaiev wrote:
I think the original is good. It is not wordy and it makes sense. A.



i agree. i think the answer should be A.
the problem with D in my opinion, even if it is idiomatic, is that the comparison is a bit confusing and the sentence seems wordy to me.

But what is the OA?
please post the OA.

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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vaibhav87 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will
be ((equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as )) the current one.
A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit
as they are.


The only viable answer choices are choices A and E. D cannot be correct because of the comparison "drivers will be as likely that they will," which is unidiomatic and jumbled. The phrase "drivers will be as likely" must be followed by an infinitive form, such as "to exceed" in choice E.

The difference between A and E is that while both ellipse certain words:

A) Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as [they are to exceed] the current one.
E) Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are [to exceed] the current one.

Only choice E uses the appropriate "as...as" idiom.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2011, 18:18
KnewtonAlex wrote:
vaibhav87 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will
be ((equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as )) the current one.
A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed
limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed
speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit
as they are.


The only viable answer choices are choices A and E. D cannot be correct because of the comparison "drivers will be as likely that they will," which is unidiomatic and jumbled. The phrase "drivers will be as likely" must be followed by an infinitive form, such as "to exceed" in choice E.

The difference between A and E is that while both ellipse certain words:

A) Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as [they are to exceed] the current one.
E) Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are [to exceed] the current one.

Only choice E uses the appropriate "as...as" idiom.


Hi KnewtonAlex,
Is "they are [to exceed] the current one" is correct sentence/clause?? What is the role of "to exceed" infinitive here.

If anyone else wants to comment, he/she is most welcome.

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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eybrj2 wrote:
I am confused if "as they are the current one" makes sense.

That is the only reason that I ruled out E.

Someone says that "likely to excedd" is omitted between "they are" and "the current one", so "as they are the current one" makes sense.
However, is that possible? Can we assume that "likely to exceed" is omitted?

so....confused........


Hi eybrj2,

Nice question.... I had the same doubt...
Initially I choosed D because as....as construction and looked better than "as they are the current one".

However this is correct because of parallelism. Parallelism is between the two clauses that indicate future action and present action.

Drivers will (be as likely to) exceed the proposed speed limit as they are (exceeding) the current one (limit).

Option D can be eliminated because "likely to exceed" is simpler construction than "likely that they will".

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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"as" is used to compare clauses not verbs.
A clause is a group of words that containg among them a subject and a verb.
In the question mentioned, the not underlined portion is a noun phrase. So if we have to use "as" then make this particular noun phrase a clause by adding a verb.
On the reasons mentioned above, ACD are eliminated.
In B, I don't think that a sole "as" can withstand the pressure of comparing.Henceforth, as likely as is preferrable.
Hope that helps.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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Experts your comments on my approach:

equally likely.... as -> wrong
as likely......as -> correct


So a,b,c - out

d -> as likely that.... as current one-> from parallelism point need THAT
so wrong

correct option E:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.
as they are (to exceed) the current (speed limit).
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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jlgdr wrote:
eybrj2 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.


Hey guys, was just taking a second look to this one..
Option (E) says "as likely to exceed the proposed limit as they are the current one"?? This can't be the correct answer.
Could someone please clarify, will offer Kudos as appreciation.

Peace


First of all, this is a question from 1000 series (most likely) so you ignore it since it is not a dependable source.
Now coming to your question:
equally ...as is not idiomatic hence eliminate A,B,C
D-as likely that the wrong idiom

E- The correct idiom is X is likely to Y.

Basically:
Correct: X is as qualified as Y.
Incorrect: X is equally qualified as Y.

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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BukrsGmat wrote:
Experts your comments on my approach:

equally likely.... as -> wrong
as likely......as -> correct


So a,b,c - out

d -> as likely that.... as current one-> from parallelism point need THAT
so wrong

correct option E:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are the current one.
as they are (to exceed) the current (speed limit).



Rule tested- Parallelism (ellipsis)

"to exceed" is implied in the second half of the sentence.

This is a case of ellipsis in comparison. In this some words omitted from the sentence to make it more concise. Both noun and verb can be omitted. The omitted words should be present in the first part of the sentence in the same form.

Jim's pen is brighter than Alex's (pen). - Correct! ("pen" is implies)
Jim is smarter than Alex (is). - Correct! ("is" is implied)

The omission of a noun for concision is straightforward. Just make sure that the 2 nouns in the sentence can be logically compared. But there are certain exceptions when you are deciding

whether to include a verb in the second half of the sentence.



Tense Shift

If the verb tense changes from the first to the second half of the sentence, then the verb must not be omitted in the second half.

· You look more beautiful think year than last year. - Incorrect

· You look more beautiful this year than you did last year.- Correct

Meaning Ambiguity-

Do not omit the verb if doing so will make the sentence’s meaning ambiguous.

I love my dog more than my friend. - Incorrect

Here, the intended meaning could be that I love my dog more than I love my friend, OR
that I love my dog more than my friend does. Since the omission of the verb in the second half of the sentence distorts the meaning, this sentence is incorrect on the GMAT.

·
I love my dog more than I love my friend.- Correct!

·
I love my dog more than my friend does.- Correct!



Coming to the option D and E

Option D makes a parallelism error. If we simplify, we get the following structures:


D. Drivers will be

as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit

as the current one (speed limit)

Comparing a clause with a noun phrase.



E. Drivers will be

as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit

as they are (to exceed ) the current one (speed limit)

Comparing two clauses.




As for the use of "that", both "likely that" and "likely to" are correct.

'Likely that' is correct.

It's likely that+ clause

Likely is often used with it as a subject

For example: It's likely that I'll be late.

The other usage is with infinitive

be likely to+ infinitive

For example: I'm likely to be late.


Hope this helps!
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New post 04 Aug 2014, 09:52
Hello guys, I would like to ask a question and hope someone can help me. thank you!!!!

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as

B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are

C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as

E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.

The answer is E no question about it.
I understand that the "they" is for the "driver" and the "current one" is for speed limit. Also we omit the "likely to exceed" between they and current one.
My question is why we can omit the "likely to exceed" and under what circumstance we can omit.
thank you guys so much, thank you!

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2015, 19:56
Marcab wrote:
"as" is used to compare clauses not verbs.
A clause is a group of words that containg among them a subject and a verb.
In the question mentioned, the not underlined portion is a noun phrase. So if we have to use "as" then make this particular noun phrase a clause by adding a verb.
On the reasons mentioned above, ACD are eliminated.
In B, I don't think that a sole "as" can withstand the pressure of comparing.Henceforth, as likely as is preferrable.
Hope that helps.
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In this question, http://gmatclub.com/forum/roughly-one-half-of-the-worlds-population-including-95938.html,

Roughly one-half of the world’s population, including virtually all of East and Southeast Asia also, is wholly dependent on rice to be its staple food.

A. including virtually all of East and Southeast Asia also, is wholly dependent on
rice to be
B. including virtually all of East and Southeast Asia, is wholly dependent on rice as
C. virtually all of East and Southeast Asia as well, wholly dependent on rice as
D. which includes virtually all of East and Southeast Asia’s, being wholly dependent
on rice as
E. which includes virtually all of East and Southeast Asia also, is wholly dependent
on rice to be

OA:B

We have "as its staple food". This segment doesn't have a verb so it cannot be called a clause. Can you please help me in understanding where I am getting wrong and how I can apply this concept in more generic fashion.

Thanks
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2015, 02:54
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as - WRONG - Equally likely....as... - makes no sense
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are - WRONG - Equally likely....as.... - makes no sense
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as - WRONG - will be....will exceed.. - to predict it is good enough to use one will
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as - WRONG - Same as C
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are - ANSWER - as likely...as - makes perfect sense. Also we have eliminated the rest of the options - hence E is the answer...

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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Text from MGMT SC Guide

The structure as...as... creates a comparison. The first as is followed by an adjective or adverb. The
second as is followed by a noun, a phrase, or even a whole clause.
Right: They are AS hungry AS you.
Right: They are AS hungry AS you are.
Right: They are AS hungry AS they were last night.
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New post 04 Jun 2016, 22:06
ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.


I can come to e but , e is also problematic, i think

the second part has " they are current one(limit)", the preceding part should have "they are proposed limit".
the ellipsis in e is correct or not.

there is a similar question in gmatprep.

According to public health officials, in 1998 Massachusetts became the first state in which more babies were born to women over the age of thirty than under it.
A. than
B. than born
C. than they were
D. than there had been
E. than had been born

in this problem, b is incorrect. we can infer that e , Oa in our problem is also incorrect but the best one

strange?
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Stop with all the fancy explanations... Please !!!

Fist read these two sentences.

1) When it comes to calorie content an apple is AS good AS a mango is.
2) For weaker and older patients a minor case of pneumonia can be as fatal as a severe cardiac attack...can be (can be is in ellipsis. It can be written or not written because the meaning is implied. )

we need as-as comparison
A) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
B) equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
C) equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
ABC out
D and E remaining.

D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one .
likely that is incorrect .. [u]likely to[/u] is the correct composition
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one. SEE HOW WRONG THE SENTENCE IS.
[/color]

E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are .
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are (ELLIPSIS :-likely to exceed ) the current one. PERFECT
E wins :- Correct Idiom "likely to"
Correct usage of "As" for comparing clause.
"They" have a proper reference in DRIVERS


E can be read as:- "as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are likely to exceed the current one."


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ritjn2003 wrote:
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.

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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 10:05
sairam595 wrote:

In option D why can't we imply " as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as [they will exceed] the current one.

Please advise.


The error is in the other part that you ignored. Its about the structure of the sentence.

Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

Structure: Subject Traffic safety officials + Verb predict + That + Subject drivers + Verb will be + Object.

The structure of a "That Clause" is
Subject + Verb + That + Subject + Verb + Object.

Here that they [sub.] will exceed [verb] is followed by as likely, which is incorrect.
Moreover, we have used will be just before the Object. Therefore, repeating it in object again seems a little redundant.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2017, 19:30
Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as the current one.

A. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as
--> wrong comparison idiom.

B. equally likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are
--> wrong comparison idiom.

C. equally likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
--> wordy and redundant. wrong comparison idiom.

D. as likely that they will exceed the proposed speed limit as
--> wordy and redundant.

E. as likely to exceed the proposed speed limit as they are.
--> correct.
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Re: Traffic safety officials predict that drivers will be equally likely t [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2017, 09:15
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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