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Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre

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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 09:44
Q1 The author implies which of the following about Geology as a science?
A. its legitimacy as a scientific discipline is not well established

B. its proper field is Earth, and therefore its analyses of other planets and moons is more speculative

C. it did not find, in previous religious models of the Earth, a sound basis for analytical theories


D. it can deduce everything about the surface of Mercury purely from Earth-based observations

E. its success derives from surviving exposure to major catastrophes

I found this question to be particularly challenging and i reached the answer by process of elimination .
For me the doubt was between A and C
But we can not infer A from the paragraph .We can only infer from the prompt that to be Serious science it should follow gradual increment processes and its model should provide explanation for the every event
So C is my answer
I would like expert to Validate my reasoning as what can i do more to improve in questions such as this .

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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 09:56
the question 1 sounds like the question type of opinion of author.

new question

All of the following would help support Turcotte’s contention that Venus' geology is quite different from every other geological entity in the solar system EXCEPT

A the size of the volcanoes on Venus
B the absence of oceans to provide erosion and weathering
C the rising temperature of the planet's core
D no natural satellite to induce continuous seismic forces
E a radioactive core that continues to generate great amounts of heat

OA is A
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 10:00
Another new question:
The passage mentioned the Biblical idea of Noah's Flood in order to

A make clear the historical basis of most objections to Turcotte's model
B demonstrate what makes geology successful as a modern science
C discredit religious influences in modern science
D provide an example of a model based on incremental changes
E suggest that the surface of Earth is older than the surface of Venus

OA is A
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 10:38
mynguyen62 wrote:
I encountered another question for this passage in Magoosh

The passage implies which of the following about volcanoes on Mars?

A. many of them remain active to the present day
B. the lava from these volcanoes would rarely flow in long rivers
C. different volcanoes, active at different times, slowly transformed the surface
D. most of them were not impacted by craters
E. they typically did not release a large amount of thermal energy at once

Spoiler: :: OA
OA is C. But I found E. equally make sense. Gradualism implies that volcanoes do not release large amount of energy all at once. Can anyone explain why E. is not applicable? Thanks


strange, I never see such question on Magoosh.
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2018, 09:09
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2018, 09:25
Timing: 8 minutes. Got all correct answers.
The first question is challenging but I got the correct answer through the POE.
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 13:00
chesstitans wrote:
the question 1 sounds like the question type of opinion of author.

gmatexam439 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry,

Can you please explain question 1. I got that wrong. Rest were directly infer-able from the passage.

Regards

Dear gmatexam439 & chesstitans,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, I would say that this question is less an "opinion of the author" question and more an inference question. See:
Inference on GMAT Reading Comprehension

This is a very challenging question, focused primarily on paragraph 4. Here's an analysis of the question:
Q1 The author implies which of the following about Geology as a science?

A. its legitimacy as a scientific discipline is not well established

No. The text says: "The triumph of gradualism was essential to the success of geology as a serious science." Geology is a serious science, so it is well established.

B. its proper field is Earth, and therefore its analyses of other planets and moons is more speculative
No. The text says: "Indeed, all features of Earth's geology and all feature of other moons and planets in the Solar System, even those that are not volcanically active, are explained very well by current gradualist models. " It sounds as if the scientific work of geology is on equally firm footing whether we are talking about Earth itself or one of the other planets or moons. Furthermore, the passage implies that "planetary geologists" are just as legitimately scientists as are geologist who study the earth: one is not doing "more real" work than the other.

C. it did not find, in previous religious models of the Earth, a sound basis for analytical theories
This sound plausible. The text says: "For two centuries, geologist of all kinds fought against the idea of catastrophic, planet-wide changes, such as the Biblical idea of Noah's Flood. The triumph of gradualism was essential to the success of geology as a serious science." An example of a "religious model of the the Earth" would be an explanation of Earth's features as a result of Noah's Flood, a story from the Bible. Geology had to fight against that and refute that approach before it could be a serious science with legitimate analytical theories. All of this implies that the previous religious-based models were compatible with a serious scientific approach and thus did not provide a sound basis for analytical theories. This is a promising answer.

D. it can deduce everything about the surface of Mercury purely from Earth-based observations
Too extreme. The text says: "Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that prevents direct observation of its surface." OK, so this implies that Mercury doesn't have a "dense, opaque atmosphere" and therefore we can do some "direct observation of its surface." Clearly, we can tell some things about the surface of Mercury simply by looking through Earth-based telescope. Does this mean we can tell everything? That, for example, sending a probe to Mercury for close-up photos would tell us absolutely nothing that we don't already know from our Earth-based photographs? You see, this one takes a reasonable idea to an absurdly extreme level, so it is wrong.

E. its success derives from surviving exposure to major catastrophes
No. This is a "word salad" kind of trap answer--it uses words from the passage, so it can trap people simply scanning for relevant words, but the words are put together in a way that states something very different from what the passage implies. Geology examined different models, and had to fight against "catastrophic" models of the Earth and establish "gradualist" models of the Earth. That's true. But Geology itself, the academic discipline, did not have to go through its own catastrophes. Catastrophes were one proposed explanation for Earth's features, an explanation that Geology rejected, but the discipline itself did not experience its own catastrophes. This answer blurs the level of analysis, and confuses what the discipline has studied for what the discipline itself was experiencing. This is wrong.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2018, 22:51
mikemcgarry wrote:
sobby wrote:
My take is C,D,E,D..OA Please

Dear sobby,

I'm happy to respond. :-) I am the author of this question and I just posted the OAs. All four of your answers are correct. Congratulations.

Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

Can you explain how is option C the best answer for question1?I chose option A.
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Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2018, 17:32
1
Kezia9 wrote:
Hi Mike,

Can you explain how is option C the best answer for question1?I chose option A.

Dear Kezia9,

My friend, for your own benefit, I will point out something ironic. Your post asking for help on question 1 is directly below an extensive post in which I explained Q1 in great detail. If you simply had read the entire thread, you would have seen that your question was already answered, less than 12 hours before you asked it.

My friend, you are reaching a point in life in which you have to take more responsibility for the questions you ask. Asking a question when the answer is readily available to you is a sure way to indicate to a manager that he shouldn't trust you or rely on you. This could be a single move that would have devastating consequences on your career advancement. Fortunately, there's no big consequence at the moment, but now is precisely the time to practice tremendous self-responsibility in the question process, so that this is an ingrained habit by the time you are in the professional world. By the time you are in the pressure of the work place, it's too late to try to learn all these good habits that you will need.

Ultimately, you are responsible for every aspect of you own education. No one achieve excellence on the GMAT simply by having experts explain things to him. Excellence is the product of exceptional effort and diligence. In this context, I would recommend the habits of excellence.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2018, 13:21
All correct (4/4) In Under 6 minutes total for reading and answering all the questions.
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Re: Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that pre  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2018, 08:50
mikemcgarry wrote:
chesstitans wrote:
the question 1 sounds like the question type of opinion of author.

gmatexam439 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry,

Can you please explain question 1. I got that wrong. Rest were directly infer-able from the passage.

Regards

Dear gmatexam439 & chesstitans,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, I would say that this question is less an "opinion of the author" question and more an inference question. See:
Inference on GMAT Reading Comprehension

This is a very challenging question, focused primarily on paragraph 4. Here's an analysis of the question:
Q1 The author implies which of the following about Geology as a science?

A. its legitimacy as a scientific discipline is not well established

No. The text says: "The triumph of gradualism was essential to the success of geology as a serious science." Geology is a serious science, so it is well established.

B. its proper field is Earth, and therefore its analyses of other planets and moons is more speculative
No. The text says: "Indeed, all features of Earth's geology and all feature of other moons and planets in the Solar System, even those that are not volcanically active, are explained very well by current gradualist models. " It sounds as if the scientific work of geology is on equally firm footing whether we are talking about Earth itself or one of the other planets or moons. Furthermore, the passage implies that "planetary geologists" are just as legitimately scientists as are geologist who study the earth: one is not doing "more real" work than the other.

C. it did not find, in previous religious models of the Earth, a sound basis for analytical theories
This sound plausible. The text says: "For two centuries, geologist of all kinds fought against the idea of catastrophic, planet-wide changes, such as the Biblical idea of Noah's Flood. The triumph of gradualism was essential to the success of geology as a serious science." An example of a "religious model of the the Earth" would be an explanation of Earth's features as a result of Noah's Flood, a story from the Bible. Geology had to fight against that and refute that approach before it could be a serious science with legitimate analytical theories. All of this implies that the previous religious-based models were compatible with a serious scientific approach and thus did not provide a sound basis for analytical theories. This is a promising answer.

D. it can deduce everything about the surface of Mercury purely from Earth-based observations
Too extreme. The text says: "Unlike Mercury and Mars, Venus has a dense, opaque atmosphere that prevents direct observation of its surface." OK, so this implies that Mercury doesn't have a "dense, opaque atmosphere" and therefore we can do some "direct observation of its surface." Clearly, we can tell some things about the surface of Mercury simply by looking through Earth-based telescope. Does this mean we can tell everything? That, for example, sending a probe to Mercury for close-up photos would tell us absolutely nothing that we don't already know from our Earth-based photographs? You see, this one takes a reasonable idea to an absurdly extreme level, so it is wrong.

E. its success derives from surviving exposure to major catastrophes
No. This is a "word salad" kind of trap answer--it uses words from the passage, so it can trap people simply scanning for relevant words, but the words are put together in a way that states something very different from what the passage implies. Geology examined different models, and had to fight against "catastrophic" models of the Earth and establish "gradualist" models of the Earth. That's true. But Geology itself, the academic discipline, did not have to go through its own catastrophes. Catastrophes were one proposed explanation for Earth's features, an explanation that Geology rejected, but the discipline itself did not experience its own catastrophes. This answer blurs the level of analysis, and confuses what the discipline has studied for what the discipline itself was experiencing. This is wrong.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Thank you for the brilliant analysis mikemcgarry.
Today I tried this passage again and got all correct in around 6 minutes. P.S. I didn't even remember the passage :-D
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