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Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that

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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2013, 06:31
i'm a non-native english speaker
i've read that even though and although should be used in the following situations:
Even though -- when the condition given is negative but the outcome/result is positive

Although -- when the condition given is positive but the outcome/result is negative


is this example an exception of this rule?
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2013, 06:46
lucasITA wrote:
i'm a non-native english speaker
i've read that even though and although should be used in the following situations:
Even though -- when the condition given is negative but the outcome/result is positive

Although -- when the condition given is positive but the outcome/result is negative


is this example an exception of this rule?


Image


Hi lucasITA,

A very simple thing to remember about "although" and "even though" is that they present contrast.

This what "even though" in the correct answer choice is doing. It's presenting the contrast. Now, what is the contradiction? The contradiction is that Barbara McClintock's colleagues thought that genre were simple and static. But Barbara McClintock did not think this way. She thought that genes worked in a very complicated way.

"Even though" in the correct answer choice presents the contrasting ideas that McClintock and her colleagues held.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2013, 20:01
(A) Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were
Conviction compared to Barbara, you can compare only similar things =>WRONG
(B) Although many of her colleagues were of the conviction of genes being
Convinced would be preferable over Conviction as per (Verb>Adject(Adverb)>Noun Rule)
(C) Contrary to many of her colleagues being convinced that genes were
Being as a participle phrase is wordy when colleagues WERE definitely convinced
(D) Eventhough many of her colleagues were convinced that genes were
No Issues
(E) Even with many of her colleagues convinced of genes being
With many of her colleagues convinced V/S Barbara adhered to
Wrong

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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2013, 00:31
The setence draws a comparason between the of a group and a person in the past. The correct verb is were not being so we can discard B and E
A convicition and Barabara McClintock is not comparable
C Contrary changes the meaning of the sentence and being convinced is the wrong tense.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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skim wrote:
Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were reatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

(A) Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were

(B) Although many of her colleagues were of the conviction of genes being

(C) Contrary to many of her colleagues being convinced that genes were

(D) Even though many of her colleagues were convinced that genes were

(E) Even with many of her colleagues convinced of genes being


Let's focus on the splits first, Ill start with the ending splits:

Even though the correct answer has this word, "were" in my opinion incorrectly implies that genes had a trait before that they do not have anymore. Because the other options had other, more serious flaws, I picked D anyway but initial assessment of end splits creates uncertainty.. Can we REALLY use "were"?

Beginning splits are all over the place here, we seem to have a 2-1-1-1 split. "Unlike" as an introductionary word sounds weird but AFAIK, is not by default wrong. What makes A wrong is that "conviction held by many of her collegues" implies her collegues are holding conviction.. Wrong.

"Although" is incorrect because it sort of tells us that "even though her collegues believed X, she adhered to her own idea". This is not the intended meaning, the intent is not to tell us what she believes IN SPITE OF the beliefs of her collegues, the intent is to specifically show us that Barbara did not agree with consensus. Therefore B is wrong. Furthermore, "were of the conviction" creates a question mark for us, it isn't necessarily wrong but it sure does sound weird. Since we've already eliminated B for other reasons, we don't need to focus on "were of the conviction".

"Contrary" implies that Barbara does something that her collegues do not do. This is the correct intent of the sentence, however "being" and "were" do not follow logically; "being" should be "were" since "adhered" modifies Barbara.. Notice the tense.

"Even with" implies that "Barbara believes this, even in the cases when her collegues are convinced of".. This is not what the author intends, he or she is not trying to tell us that Barbara adhered to her own ideas in case X, Y and Z. The author is trying to tell us that CONTRARY to her collegues, she believes X.

D uses "were" in a correct way to parallel collegues and genes, and it uses "even THOUGH" correctly which says that "she believed X though her collegues believed Y", this is basically another way of saying "CONTRARY to her collegues, Barbara believes X".

So even though I was unsure of whether "were" is tense-wise correct, there are almost ALWAYS more than one fault with the other options and therefor you should not impulsively eliminate options just because you are not sure if they are correct. Only when you are 100% certain of a split being wrong should you eliminate it.
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Usage of Being - OG Q31 [#permalink]

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Hi e-gmat team,

I have read your article on the usage of being, and still this question (OG 13 Q31) has baffled me.
I have read your explanation for this answer. But use of being is not clear in it.
Please explain me why the usage of being is wrong in choice C?

Is not this usage the same as first usage explained in the article, Being used as noun??

OG Question 31

Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues
that genes were
relatively simple and static, Barbara
McClintock adhered to her own more complicated
ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983,
at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her
discovery that the genes in corn are capable of
moving from one chromosomal site to another.

(A) Unlike the conviction held by many of her
colleagues that genes were

(B) Although many of her colleagues were of the
conviction of genes being

(C) Contrary to many of her colleagues being
convinced that genes were


(D) Even though many of her colleagues were
convinced that genes were

(E) Even with many of her colleagues convinced of
genes being

Thanks
Smriti Kumar
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Re: Usage of Being - OG Q31 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2014, 12:22
Hi Smriti,

In choice C, "being" acts as a modifier and not a noun. "Being" should be used as a Subject with a Verb to be correct. Just being a noun will not make the use of "being" correct.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2015, 04:00
Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were reatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

(A) Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were

(B) Although many of her colleagues were of the conviction of genes being

(C) Contrary to many of her colleagues being convinced that genes were

(D) Even though many of her colleagues were convinced that genes were

(E) Even with many of her colleagues convinced of genes being

CHOICE A:
Incorrect:
The sentence has the comparison error as pointed out in error analysis.

CHOICE B:
Incorrect:
This choice incorrectly uses “being”. To learn about the correct usage of “being”, please read this article.

CHOICE C
Incorrect:
This choice again repeats the error of “being” and fails to communicate the intended meaning clearly.

CHOICE D
Correct:
This choice corrects the idiom error and presents the intended logical contrast.

CHOICE E
Incorrect:
Use of “being” is incorrect.
The phrase “even with many…” fails to convey the intended contrast precisely.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2015, 16:56
Is there anything wrong with "convinced of" ?
Isnt it cannot express what her colleagues' conviction was?

pls help, thanks
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2015, 21:09
Ptting wrote:
Is there anything wrong with "convinced of" ?
Isnt it cannot express what her colleagues' conviction was?

Hi! You ask a very good question, something that is quite frequently tested on GMAT, and comes under stylistic preference/meaning clarity.

Am assuming you are talking about option E. With E, the sentence would be:

Even with many of her colleagues convinced of genes being relatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

From a meaning perspective, the question we should be asking is:

(i) Were many of her colleagues convinced of genes (this is what option E states) or
(ii) Were many of her colleagues convinced about some property of genes.

Clearly, many of her colleagues were convinced about some property of genes (that genes were relatively simple and static).

Hence, the usage of that becomes important from a meaning clarity perspective. So, the correct sentence would be:

Even though many of her colleagues were convinced that genes were relatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses this particular usage of that, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id, I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2015, 18:39
EducationAisle wrote:
Ptting wrote:
Is there anything wrong with "convinced of" ?
Isnt it cannot express what her colleagues' conviction was?

Hi! You ask a very good question, something that is quite frequently tested on GMAT, and comes under stylistic preference/meaning clarity.

Am assuming you are talking about option E. With E, the sentence would be:

Even with many of her colleagues convinced of genes being relatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

From a meaning perspective, the question we should be asking is:

(i) Were many of her colleagues convinced of genes (this is what option E states) or
(ii) Were many of her colleagues convinced about some property of genes.

Clearly, many of her colleagues were convinced about some property of genes (that genes were relatively simple and static).

Hence, the usage of that becomes important from a meaning clarity perspective. So, the correct sentence would be:

Even though many of her colleagues were convinced that genes were relatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses this particular usage of that, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id, I can mail the corresponding section.


It really helps!!! thanks a lot
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2015, 06:22
besides "being", dose choice C contain any other error?
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2015, 00:45
thangvietnam wrote:
besides "being", dose choice C contain any other error?



I don't think there is any other error in C besides being.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2016, 09:47
ardsouza wrote:
Although I agree with most of the reasoning behind D, the phrase "genes were" should ideally be "genes are" as the behavior of genes in general is being described and not a past behavior. In the light of this error, I believe E becomes the better answer of the two.

Any thoughts?


i have the same doubt... I didnt choose D because of the were.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2016, 17:49
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If we can realize the futility of using ‘being’ in such contexts, we have a safe way of dumping a few wrong choices in one stroke. In GMAT ‘being’ is acceptable only in cases where it is part of a noun phrase that acts as the subject or when it is part of a passive voice structure preceded by an auxiliary derivative of the base verb ‘be’ such as is, are, was or were etc. Whenever you see, ‘being’, ask what is being or who is being. If you get a positive answer, then ‘being’ is a modifier and that structure is unacceptable in GMAT.

In the given case, ‘being’ definitely modifies the genes in B and E, and her colleagues in C. So, all the three are wrong. A can be removed for improper comparison.

So D.
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Even though or Although? No clear rule on this. [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2016, 00:33
egmat wrote:
lucasITA wrote:
i'm a non-native english speaker
i've read that even though and although should be used in the following situations:
Even though -- when the condition given is negative but the outcome/result is positive

Although -- when the condition given is positive but the outcome/result is negative


is this example an exception of this rule?


Image


Hi lucasITA,

A very simple thing to remember about "although" and "even though" is that they present contrast.

This what "even though" in the correct answer choice is doing. It's presenting the contrast. Now, what is the contradiction? The contradiction is that Barbara McClintock's colleagues thought that genre were simple and static. But Barbara McClintock did not think this way. She thought that genes worked in a very complicated way.

"Even though" in the correct answer choice presents the contrasting ideas that McClintock and her colleagues held.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha



There are two theories circulating around regarding the usage of Even Though and Although.


1) 'Even though' when the condition given is negative but the outcome/result is positive (Even though Ram hadn't studied, he passed the exam).
'Although' when the condition given is positive but the outcome/result is negative (Although Ram had studied very hard, he did not score well).

But, it's not always possible to identify whether which between the condition and the outcome is more positive/negative (just like 'convinced that genes were simple' vs 'complicated ideas' in this question).

2) Even though is more emphatic than though and although.

This is even more vague, since the degree of emphasis that candidates perceive might not be the same as what GMAT perceives. On what ground can we conclude that either 'even though' is underused or "although' is overused in a sentence?
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 03:12
Can anyone please explain why 'E' is wrong here?

skim wrote:
Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were reatively simple and static, Barbara McClintock adhered to her own more complicated ideas about how genes might operate, and in 1983, at the age of 81, was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discovery that the genes in corn are capable of moving from one chromosomal site to another.

(A) Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that genes were

(B) Although many of her colleagues were of the conviction of genes being

(C) Contrary to many of her colleagues being convinced that genes were

(D) Even though many of her colleagues were convinced that genes were

(E) Even with many of her colleagues convinced of genes being
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 03:50
jjindal wrote:
Can anyone please explain why 'E' is wrong here?


In GMAT, it is generally observed that using a clause with a noun and a verb is preferred to using a phrase with noun and a present participle / past participle modifier .

I am convinced that you are the murderer.... better - clause: noun (you) + verb (are )
I am convinced of you being the murderer..... awkward - phrase: noun (you) + present participle (being)

In option E 2 such awkward usages are there:

colleagues convinced (noun + past participle)
genes being (noun + present participle)

Better would be: colleagues were convinced that genes were.... (clause1 : colleagues were convinced, clause 2: genes were....) This is how option D is constructed and is the correct option.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 04:04
D is the correct choice.

A has a problem with like/unlike , which should always follow noun or noun phrases.
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Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2016, 13:10
Split1) Avoid comparing convictions to McClintock. A is out.
Split2) Dependent Clause, + Independent Clause construction. How do you determine that the first part is a dependent clause? 1) you have the subordinate conjunction "Even though" placed in front of the clause. Also, the first part of the sentence is not complete, you know that the listener is expecting some extra material coming after the comma. B, C and E are out.
Split3) the word "being" in B and C. Whenever I see the word "being" I get the feeling that the whole sentence is wrong. The use of "being" makes the sentence long/wordy/awkward and it also changes the meaning. That's why i did not like B and C.
Re: Unlike the conviction held by many of her colleagues that   [#permalink] 09 Oct 2016, 13:10

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