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Unlike the original National Museum of Science and

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2013, 15:01
targetgmatchotu wrote:
pqhai wrote:
targetgmatchotu wrote:
IMHO,

It is the infinitive "to touch" that "which" modifies.

Meaning wise touch should activate.........

So, IMO I have an inclination for (E).However, the OA is (D).

Experts opinion plz

Rgds,
TGC


Hi TGC

According to Manhattan GMAT, sentence correction, page 86.
Which is relative pronoun that must modify things (noun or noun phrase)
Hence, "which" cannot modify the infinitive "to touch".

Hope it helps.


Hi pqhai,

In the same Guide (MGMAT SC) it is mentioned that "infinitive" has three functions:

(1). Noun
(2). ADJ
(3). ADVERB

Plz Advice !

Rgds,
TGC


Hi TGC
You're correct. infinitive can be used as noun, adjective or adverb.

(1) Infinitive = noun
To sleep is the only thing I can do now
"to sleep" functions as a noun because it is the subject of the sentence

(2) Infinitive = adjective
When I'm on the bus, I always bring my ipad to surf internet.
To surf functions as an adjective because it modifies noun - the ipad [ipad to surf]

(3) Infinitive = adverb.
He closed the window to avoid strong wind.
To avoid functions as an adverd because it modifies verb - "closed" [closed to avoid]

Hope it helps.

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2013, 20:06
Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to “touch” each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates

activates is singular, but we're dealing with visitors, so we need a plural

B. exhibit, in turn an activation of

This doesn't even begin to make sense

C. exhibit, and it will activate

this changes the meaning (causation) too much. What does "it" refer to? The exhibit doesn't activate itself... it's activated by the visitors

D. exhibit and thereby activate

this works and keeps the cause and effect of the sentence the same

E. exhibit which, as a result, activates

The leonardo project encouraging members to touch each exhibit doesn't necessarily, as a result, activate anything. This is wrong because of how which changes the meaning of the sentence

Think of E like this:

The leonardo project encourages members to "touch" each exhibit which, as a result, activates the animated functions of the piece

simplify to

The project encourages members to touch each exhibit which activates the functions.

In addition to just sounding 100% off, this would mean that the project is encouraging the members to find out which exhibits activate the functions and then touch them based off of that fact. Even though the "as a result" is there, using "which" instead of "that" is enough to change the causation and set the clause apart.

It's a subtle change in meaning but it's enough to disqualify.

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2013, 20:15
x2suresh wrote:
scthakur wrote:
x2suresh wrote:
Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to “touch” each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates - it is not exhibit that activates....
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of - incomplete sentence....
C. exhibit, and it will activate - it is not museum that activates....
D. exhibit and thereby activate - the best
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates- it is not exhibit that activates....


I think "each" is wrongly underlined as it does not appear in option A.


agree with your logic..

OA is D


Same here D is my answer

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2013, 22:48
targetgmatchotu wrote:

So, IMO I have an inclination for (E).However, the OA is (D).

Experts opinion plz

Rgds,
TGC


TGC
to understand the real problem try breaking the clause, and try replicating it with another scenario.
Ok, try to look at this construction.

"I have to press a button which activates missile launch" over here which gives info about the button if you read the MGMAT SC guide regarding use of which , it clearly states that which is to be used to modify THINGS so which over here is modifying button.
similarly in this question which is modifying exhibit, "touch" is an action not a thing.

hope that helps :)
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2013, 22:53
I believe the crucial question is “who/what” activates animated functions of the piece (=exhibit) – visitors or exhibit itself?

If we assume exhibit activates functions, then the core of the sentence would read -
Project … encourages visitors to touch the exhibit, which activates functions of the piece (=exhibit)
-- this is wrong. The sentence would have to say something like –
exhibit activates functions of itself or
exhibit activates its functions.

Since that’s not the structure in the non-underlined portion, it must be visitors who activate the functions!

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2013, 23:40
Target,

The 2 things are not mutually exclusive.

The infinitive can indeed have those 3 functions.

The key thing is that WHICH can not be used with an infinitive in this way for the reasons stated above.

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2013, 04:43
Thanks for the explanations.

I agree with the explanation that 'WHICH' cannot be used to refer to an "INFINITIVE'.

However, consider the meaning of the sentence.

X encourages visitors to "touch" each exhibit,which thereby activates Y.

The intended meaning of the author:

Don't you guys think that it is the TOUCH which activated Y, and IT was not the SECOND action of activation
By the VISITORS.

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Unlike the original National Museum of - WHICH antecedent? [#permalink]

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Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to "touch" each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of
C. exhibit, and it will activate
D. exhibit and thereby activate
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates

The solution is pretty simple i.e D.
But what confused me is the explanation in OG for choice A.
According to me 'which ' refers to exhibit and exhibit cannot activate the .... Hence wrong.
But explanation says that 'which' has no antecedent .Hence wrong.

As far as i know , WHICH modifies the immediate preceding noun. Here its "exhibit".

Please let me know where i am going wrong?

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of - WHICH antecedent? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2014, 06:24
Yes true, the relative pronoun’ which’ is wrongly placed after ‘exhibit, because exhibit cannot activate; It is the act of touching that activates. So we don’t know what that word which is trying to refer to; Hence it simply dangling. The OG says that there is no antecedent for ‘which
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of - WHICH antecedent? [#permalink]

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rajgurinder wrote:
Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to "touch" each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of
C. exhibit, and it will activate
D. exhibit and thereby activate
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates

The solution is pretty simple i.e D.
But what confused me is the explanation in OG for choice A.
According to me 'which ' refers to exhibit and exhibit cannot activate the .... Hence wrong.
But explanation says that 'which' has no antecedent .Hence wrong.

As far as i know , WHICH modifies the immediate preceding noun. Here its "exhibit".

Please let me know where i am going wrong?


Hi there,

What the explanation seems to mean is that there's no logical antecedent for "which". As you've pointed out, "exhibit" can't be the antecedent of "which" in any logical sense. According to the intended meaning of the sentence, it's clearly the action "to touch" that is responsible for activating the functions. Since there's no noun in the sentence that "which" can logically refer to, we can conclude that this pronoun shouldn't actually be in the underlined portion. So, in this sense, there's no antecedent for "which" in the sentence. It seems to refer to the preceding noun, but logically, it can't.

I hope this helps to clarify your doubt.

Regards,
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2014, 12:39
I thought that ",which" was the ONLY time that "which" would refer to the noun prior to the comma. Answer choice E does not have a comma before the "which" -- how does that affect the reasoning?

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Unlike the original national museum [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2014, 01:30
Unlike the original national museum of science and technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass operated only by staff members, the virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to "touch" each exhibit, which thereby activated the animated functions of the piece.
a) exhibit, which thereby activates
b) exhibit, in turn an activation of
c) exhibit, and it will activate
d) exhibit and thereby activate
e) exhibit which, as a result, activates

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Re: Unlike the original national museum [#permalink]

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Ravish do not post questions, which are already discussed extensively on Gmatclub. Use search option at the top right corner to find old threads.

Please refer link for this question : unlike-the-original-national-museum-of-science-and-75497.html
If you have any specific doubt, which is not answered on the forum, then please post it on above mentioned thread.
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2014, 01:01
Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to “touch” each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of
C. exhibit, and it will activate
D. exhibit and thereby activate
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates


in option A) which is referring to exhibit because there is no other noun preceding it.which should refer to "touch".
I understand that "to touch" is an infinitive,an action and not a noun.
I want to know that if we use infinitives as subject can we refer to them with "which" or "it"(pronouns)
eg. 1)To err is human. can we now use any pronoun to refer to "to err".
2)to swim is good for health.


Also want to know that if infinitives can be verbs or nouns or play some other role.
eg In the official question "to touch" refers to an action. so can i call it a verb ?
In the 2nd sentence "To err" is the subject. can i call it a noun ??

i think that both the questions are interrelated.
please help.

please help.

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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SidKaria wrote:
Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to “touch” each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of
C. exhibit, and it will activate
D. exhibit and thereby activate
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates


in option A) which is referring to exhibit because there is no other noun preceding it.which should refer to "touch".
I understand that "to touch" is an infinitive,an action and not a noun.
I want to know that if we use infinitives as subject can we refer to them with "which" or "it"(pronouns)
eg. 1)To err is human. can we now use any pronoun to refer to "to err".
2)to swim is good for health.


Also want to know that if infinitives can be verbs or nouns or play some other role.
eg In the official question "to touch" refers to an action. so can i call it a verb ?
In the 2nd sentence "To err" is the subject. can i call it a noun ??

i think that both the questions are interrelated.
please help.

please help.



Hi Sid,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

You do ask a very interesting question. Let me try to clarify your doubts without creating any further confusions.

The "to verb" or "the infinitive" (for those who prefer jargon" is an action phrase that grammatically acts as a noun. This is the reason why we can use "to err" or for that matter several other "to verb" phrases as the Subject of a sentence. However, they are not the conventional noun, just like the verb-ing" nouns or "gerunds", as they also present some action. Only their grammatical form is Noun but essentially they are action words. This is the reason why we CANNOT use any pronoun, be it the regular pronouns or the Relative Pronouns. to refer to "to verbs". The regular pronouns and the Relative Pronouns ONLY refer to regular conventional noun entities.

So yes, you can call them nouns but just for the grammar sake. In functionality, they are actually action words. However, we cannot call the "to verbs" regular Verbs because they CANNOT have any tense. They are used in the same form in sentences written in past, perfect, or future tense. Again, grammatically they cannot be called Verbs because they are already classified as nouns. And an entity can only perform one grammatical function.

Now, is this knowledge vital for solving SC questions? IMHO, it's not. This is more of a grammar detail that is good to know but not something that will help solve SC problems correctly.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2014, 09:53
SidKaria wrote:
Unlike the original National Museum of Science and Technology in Italy, where the models are encased in glass or operated only by staff members, the Virtual Leonardo Project, an online version of the museum, encourages visitors to “touch” each exhibit, which thereby activates the animated functions of the piece.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of
C. exhibit, and it will activate
D. exhibit and thereby activate
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates


in option A) which is referring to exhibit because there is no other noun preceding it.which should refer to "touch".
I understand that "to touch" is an infinitive,an action and not a noun.
I want to know that if we use infinitives as subject can we refer to them with "which" or "it"(pronouns)
eg. 1)To err is human. can we now use any pronoun to refer to "to err".
2)to swim is good for health.


Also want to know that if infinitives can be verbs or nouns or play some other role.
eg In the official question "to touch" refers to an action. so can i call it a verb ?
In the 2nd sentence "To err" is the subject. can i call it a noun ??

i think that both the questions are interrelated.
please help.

please help.



Hi Sid,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

You do ask a very interesting question. Let me try to clarify your doubts without creating any further confusions.

The "to verb" or "the infinitive" (for those who prefer jargon" is an action phrase that grammatically acts as a noun. This is the reason why we can use "to err" or for that matter several other "to verb" phrases as the Subject of a sentence. However, they are not the conventional noun, just like the verb-ing" nouns or "gerunds", as they also present some action. Only their grammatical form is Noun but essentially they are action words. This is the reason why we CANNOT use any pronoun, be it the regular pronouns or the Relative Pronouns. to refer to "to verbs". The regular pronouns and the Relative Pronouns ONLY refer to regular conventional noun entities.

So yes, you can call them nouns but just for the grammar sake. In functionality, they are actually action words. However, we cannot call the "to verbs" regular Verbs because they CANNOT have any tense. They are used in the same form in sentences written in past, perfect, or future tense. Again, grammatically they cannot be called Verbs because they are already classified as nouns. And an entity can only perform one grammatical function.

Now, is this knowledge vital for solving SC questions? IMHO, it's not. This is more of a grammar detail that is good to know but not something that will help solve SC problems correctly.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 07:54
Hi SJ,

Can you please help me understand why is 2nd option wrong? I marked it out thinking its too wordy but I'm not sure of the exact reason because on a second thought it doesn't look that bad either.

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2014, 08:06
sk5002 wrote:
Hi SJ,

Can you please help me understand why is 2nd option wrong? I marked it out thinking its too wordy but I'm not sure of the exact reason because on a second thought it doesn't look that bad either.


Hi sk5002,

Choice B completely fails to communicate the intended meaning. The intended meaning of the sentence is that in the virtual museum, the visitors are allowed to touch the exhibits and their touch activates the animated function of the touched pieces.

But Choice B fails to convey this. That the "activation of the animated functions" happens because of the visitors touching the exhibit is not conveyed in an effective manner. The correct answer Choice D corrects this error as it maintains perfect parallelism by saying that visitors are encouraged "to touch" the exhibit" and thus "(to) activate" the animated functions.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2014, 06:01
to touch and to activate is correct.

A. exhibit, which thereby activates ===> Should be activate, so eliminated
B. exhibit, in turn an activation of ===>Incomplete sentence, so eliminated
C. exhibit, and it will activate ==> No clear antecedent for IT ( Touch or Exhibit)
D. exhibit and thereby activate ===> Activate , so correct
E. exhibit which, as a result, activates ===> Should be activate, so eliminated

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Re: Unlike the original National Museum of Science and   [#permalink] 26 Jul 2014, 06:01

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