GMAT Changed on April 16th - Read about the latest changes here

It is currently 25 May 2018, 00:05

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 05 Nov 2012
Posts: 506
Concentration: Technology, Other
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Sep 2014, 02:11
My vote for A.
Its between A and C. Eshan has already given crisp explain for the options. So will just share my reasoning for A and C.

Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth century did not contain titanium. However, a new type of analysis detected titanium
1: in the ink of the famous Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg and
2: in that of another fifteenth century Bible known as B-36, though not in the ink of any of numerous other fifteenth-century books analyzed.
This finding is of great significance, since it not only strongly supports the hypothesis that
1: B-36 was printed by Gutenberg but also shows that [2 items r linked to JG based upon usage of T based ink.This assumes that usage of ink was restricted]
2: the presence of titanium in the ink of the purportedly fifteenth century Vinland Map can no longer be regarded as a reason for doubting the map’s authenticity.[Note this doesn't link to JG but assumes that usage of ink was not restricted.]

The reasoning in the passage is vulnerable to criticism on the ground that
(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely restricted
>>Correct as explained above.
(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document
>> C is too general must not always be true to raise doubt on the arg.Second, as per the argument only doubt regarding the date has been fixed. The date hasn't been determined in the arg.
_________________

--------------------------------------------------------
Regards :)

Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
B
Joined: 13 Feb 2015
Posts: 745
Premium Member
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Aug 2017, 23:23
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
_________________

Please Read: Verbal Posting Rules

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 08:45
The reasoning in the passage is vulnerable to criticism on the ground that
(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely restricted
(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not --> irrelevant as did not mention in passage.
(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document
(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the identity of the person who made them is known --> irrelevant. the passage did not say any thing about the books/map merit. just conclude that both books were printed by same guy and the map must be authentic.
(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the B-36 Bible --> irrelevant, did not compare the printed date.
Down to C and A.

In C: mentioned both date and location can be determined by element of ink, this case Titanium. But the passage, there was no mention of map's printed location.
--> Choose A. in the first sentence of passage, "it is thought that ink used before the sixteenth century did not contain titanium" --> there is no firm confirmation that ink before 16th century did not contain titanium, we cant rule out the possibility that titanium can be used, might be in some restricted way, in ink in 15th century --> A supports this.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 21 Jul 2017
Posts: 113
Location: India
Concentration: Social Entrepreneurship, Leadership
GMAT 1: 650 Q47 V33
GPA: 4
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 10:40
I narrowed down it to option A and C. And then picked C. Please explain!
SVP
SVP
avatar
P
Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 1905
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V33
GPA: 3.64
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 16:16
first, this is a weaken question. It is hard to realize the question type.
Next, I chose C but I belive A is much better. "not in others" in the passage and "strictly use" in option A tell that A is indeed an assumption.

B,D and E are out of scope.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Feb 2017
Posts: 38
Schools: CBS '20 (S)
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 20:11
Question core:

Premise: Recently found that certain X & Y 15th century books contain Ti in ink, but no other books
Conclusion: So, V map is authentic because other 15th century books also have Ti in ink AND only JG could have printed it

This conclusion is based on 2 opposing views -
V map is authentic since Ti in ink wasn't unpopular - anyone could have printed it
only JG could have printed it meaning it was unpopular - only JG could have printed it

That's why (A)

It took 4.5 mins, to decipher this question since the answer choices aren't straight-forward.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: The best is yet to come.....
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 516
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2017, 02:03
I got the right answer by POE. See, how?

(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely restricted--> Don't understand exactly. So, hold it.

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not--> knowledge of the printers or artists is not discussed here. So, it is out of scope.

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document--> Determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing is not main concern here. So, out.

(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the identity of the person who made them is known--> The argument does not talk about appreciation of the documents. So. out.

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the B-36 Bible--> Relative time frame is not the focus of the argument. So, out.

Therefore, answer would be A.

_________________

Hasan Mahmud

Expert Post
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
S
Joined: 20 Nov 2016
Posts: 274
CAT Tests
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Aug 2017, 10:47
Thanks for your explanations!

To post additional questions not already addressed in this thread, feel free to use the request verbal experts' reply button.
_________________

www.gmatninja.com

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 31 Dec 2015
Posts: 16
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Aug 2017, 11:17
I fail to understand why the answer is choice (A) and why not (D). Please help.
Expert Post
3 KUDOS received
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1681
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: 340 Q170 V170
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Aug 2017, 15:18
3
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
sameerkamath21 wrote:
I fail to understand why the answer is choice (A) and why not (D). Please help.

The argument has nothing to do with the appreciation of the B-36 and Vinland Map, so choice (D) is not relevant.

Instead, the argument is based the following analysis: "a new type of analysis detected titanium in the ink of the famous Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg and in that of another fifteenth-century Bible known as B-36, though not in the ink of any of numerous other fifteenth-century books analyzed."

Prior to that analysis, "it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth century did not contain titanium." As a result, PRIOR to the analysis, "the presence of titanium in the ink of the purportedly fifteenth century Vinland Map" was regarded as a reason for doubting the map's authenticity.

The author interprets the analysis by saying that, since titanium was found in two pre-sixteenth-century bibles, it must be possible for titanium to be present in the ink of various other pre-sixteenth century documents (such as the Vinland Map). Thus, even though it contains titanium ink, it is possible that the Vinland Map was created before the sixteenth century. This reasoning is based on the notion that, even though only found in two documents, usage of titanium in ink was possible in VARIOUS pre-sixteenth-century documents (i.e. the usage was NOT restricted).

But the author also concludes that the analysis "strongly supports the hypothesis that B-36 was printed by Gutenberg." The author concludes that, since use of titanium was so restricted before the 16th century, it is likely that any pre-sixteenth century document containing titanium ink was printed by Gutenberg. This reasoning is based on the notion that the usage of titanium in ink WAS restricted; otherwise, the presence of titanium in ink could not be used as evidence to support that Gutenberg was the printer.

Thus, the author uses two contradictory lines of reasoning, as described in choice (A).

I hope that helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 07 Sep 2014
Posts: 431
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2017, 21:51
Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth century did not contain titanium. However, a new type of analysis detected titanium in the ink of the famous Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg and in that of another fifteenth-century Bible known as B-36, though not in the ink of any of numerous other fifteenth-century books analyzed. This finding is of great significance, since it not only strongly supports the hypothesis that B-36 was printed by Gutenberg but also shows that the presence of titanium in the ink of the purportedly fifteenth century Vinland Map can no longer be regarded as a reason for doubting the map’s authenticity.

The reasoning in the passage is vulnerable to criticism on the ground that

(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely restricted

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not :- Not relevant.

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document
We are not concerned with the date or location.


(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the identity of the person who made them is known :- Not relevant.

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the B-36 Bible :- Not relevant

Argument ques : weakener
This finding is of great significance, since it not only strongly supports the hypothesis that B-36 was printed by Gutenberg but also shows that the presence of titanium in the ink of the purportedly fifteenth century Vinland Map can no longer be regarded as a reason for doubting the map’s authenticity.

Conclusion :- B-36 was printed by G. + Map is authentic (why? because Ti was present in the ink - 1600th century and not in 15th century)

Bible printed by G and another bible B-36 (1500th century) both has titanium so B-36 must be printed by G.
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Mar 2018
Posts: 1
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2018, 04:17
1
This post received
KUDOS
Passage tells you : Titanium not used before 16th century. Analysis tells: 1) Bible by Gutenberg contains titanium. 2) B-36 from 15th century contains titanium. 3) Presence of titanium can't be used as evidence to tell that Vinland map didn't belong to 15th century.

Author's conclusion: From (1) & (2) he tells that --> B-36 was written by Gutenberg since Titanium was used only by Gutenberg. (Conclusion A: Restricted usage of titanium by Gutenberg)

From (2) & (3) --> Since Vinland maps had titanium it was doubted if it belonged to 15th century since 15th century books dint have titanium(as given in the 1st line of the passage). B-36 belongs to 15th century and it had titanium. So 15th century used titanium in ink. So presence of titanium in Vinland maps can't be used as a reason to doubt if it belonged to the 15th century. (Conclusion B: Titanium was not only by used by Gutenberg but also someone used it in printing vinland maps. Thus usage wasn't restricted)

My Explanation : From Conclusion A and Conclusion B, we can tell that author has arrived to his conclusions by both restricting the usage of titanium and not restricting the usage of titanium which can be a flaw to his reasoning. How can he change the variable value and arrive in his conclusions. (For ex: using X="Restricted usage of titanium" for equation (1) and (2) and using X="Not restricted usage of titanium" in equation (2) and (3))

The question is "The reasoning in the passage is vulnerable to criticism on the ground that" - FIND A FLAW IN THE REASONING AND NOT TO STRENGTHEN/WEAKEN HIS CONCLUSIONS. (For ex: "If you eat XYZ food, you will feel sad and thus you will gain weight" and you are asked to find flaw in this reasoning, you should either prove "eating XYZ doesn't result in feeling sad" or "feeling sad doesn't result in gaining weight" and NOT proving that "eating XYZ wont make me gain weight")

(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely restricted -- This falls in line with my explanation.

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not -- doesn't matter if they knew about it or not. They used it in 15th century. Vinland Maps and B-36 has it. Still doesn't bring criticism to author's reasoning.

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document -- "Date of a document" here can only refer to Vinland Maps in this passage. Author didn't SUPPOSE that "Presence of titanium proves that Vinland maps belong to 15th century", he said that "Presence of titanium can't be used as a doubt that if Vinland Map belonged to 15th century"

(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the identity of the person who made them is known -- Author didn't link merits of these objects with "Gutenbery" or them belonging to 15th century. This option will only weaken Author's reasoning if he had linked "Merits" to "date of creation" and "Gutenberg" which he clearly din't in this passage.

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the B-36 Bible -- doesn't matter which was discovered first. The author gives his reasoning after all three discoveries have been made. Doesn't matter which variable is assigned the value first.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Sep 2017
Posts: 16
CAT Tests
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2018, 14:20
eshan429 wrote:
itzmyzone911 wrote:
Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth century did not
contain titanium. However, a new type of analysis detected titanium in the ink of
the famous Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg and in that of another fifteenthcentury
Bible known as B-36, though not in the ink of any of numerous other
fifteenth-century books analyzed. This finding is of great significance, since it not
only strongly supports the hypothesis that B-36 was printed by Gutenberg but
also shows that the presence of titanium in the ink of the purportedly fifteenth
century Vinland Map can no longer be regarded as a reason for doubting the
map’s authenticity.
The reasoning in the passage is vulnerable to criticism on the ground that

(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium
as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely
restricted

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has
only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the
fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a
document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the
presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document

(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated
on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the
identity of the person who made them is known

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred
before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the
B-36 Bible


I would go with A. Here's my reasoning:

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not ---->The argument never talks about whether the artists were aware of titanium being an ingredient of the ink or not. It focuses on the fact whether titanium was common in the paints of that era or not. Out of Scope

(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the identity of the person who made them is known ---->Again, we don't care about whether the objects can be appreciated or not. Out of Scope

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the B-36 Bible ---->Yes, it does seem from the argument that titanium was discovered in the ink of the Vinland map before it was found in the two Bibles. But this is not what we are debating. Out of Scope

I was confused between A and C and I went with A. I discarded C as follows.

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document ---->The author never says that the Vinland map is from the 15th century just because titanium was discovered in the ink. Rather, it can be inferred from the argument that the discovery of titanium in the ink of the map had cast a doubt on it's authenticity when all the other clues might have been pointing to the fact that it was made in the 15th century. So, C is wrong

Which leaves only A which must be correct.

Please let me know the OA.


This is great reasoning and good explanation for why C is incorrect. Thank you. However, A still strikes me as incorrect too (and even more so). By discovering something in the 15th century having titanium ink, the theory is disproved that such use dates from the 16thC onward only and therefore the map may be from the 15thC. This last deduction is a very far cry from saying its 15thC use was prevalent (not restricted). It may have been printed by Gutenberg as well. And may be the only other object with titanium ink. So A therefore seems totally incorrect whereas C appears unresponsive to the location of the map.
Expert Post
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
S
Joined: 20 Nov 2016
Posts: 274
CAT Tests
Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2018, 14:40
datatrader wrote:
eshan429 wrote:
itzmyzone911 wrote:
Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth century did not
contain titanium. However, a new type of analysis detected titanium in the ink of
the famous Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg and in that of another fifteenthcentury
Bible known as B-36, though not in the ink of any of numerous other
fifteenth-century books analyzed. This finding is of great significance, since it not
only strongly supports the hypothesis that B-36 was printed by Gutenberg but
also shows that the presence of titanium in the ink of the purportedly fifteenth
century Vinland Map can no longer be regarded as a reason for doubting the
map’s authenticity.
The reasoning in the passage is vulnerable to criticism on the ground that

(A) the results of the analysis are interpreted as indicating that the use of titanium
as an ingredient in fifteenth-century ink both was, and was not, extremely
restricted

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has
only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the
fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a
document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the
presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document

(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated
on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the
identity of the person who made them is known

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred
before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the
B-36 Bible


I would go with A. Here's my reasoning:

(B) if the technology that makes it possible to detect titanium in printing ink has only recently become available, it is unlikely that printers or artists in the fifteenth century would know whether their ink contained titanium or not ---->The argument never talks about whether the artists were aware of titanium being an ingredient of the ink or not. It focuses on the fact whether titanium was common in the paints of that era or not. Out of Scope

(D) both the B-36 Bible and the Vinland Map are objects that can be appreciated on their own merits whether or not the precise date of their creation or the identity of the person who made them is known ---->Again, we don't care about whether the objects can be appreciated or not. Out of Scope

(E) the discovery of titanium in the ink of the Vinland Map must have occurred before titanium was discovered in the ink of the Gutenberg Bible and the B-36 Bible ---->Yes, it does seem from the argument that titanium was discovered in the ink of the Vinland map before it was found in the two Bibles. But this is not what we are debating. Out of Scope

I was confused between A and C and I went with A. I discarded C as follows.

(C) it is unreasonable to suppose that determination of the date and location of a document’s printing or drawing can be made solely on the basis of the presence or absence of a single element in the ink used in the document ---->The author never says that the Vinland map is from the 15th century just because titanium was discovered in the ink. Rather, it can be inferred from the argument that the discovery of titanium in the ink of the map had cast a doubt on it's authenticity when all the other clues might have been pointing to the fact that it was made in the 15th century. So, C is wrong

Which leaves only A which must be correct.

Please let me know the OA.


This is great reasoning and good explanation for why C is incorrect. Thank you. However, A still strikes me as incorrect too (and even more so). By discovering something in the 15th century having titanium ink, the theory is disproved that such use dates from the 16thC onward only and therefore the map may be from the 15thC. This last deduction is a very far cry from saying its 15thC use was prevalent (not restricted). It may have been printed by Gutenberg as well. And may be the only other object with titanium ink. So A therefore seems totally incorrect whereas C appears unresponsive to the location of the map.

datatrader, have you read this explanation? See if that helps you understand why choice (A) is correct.
_________________

www.gmatninja.com

Re: Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu   [#permalink] 13 Mar 2018, 14:40

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 34 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Until recently it was thought that ink used before the sixteenth centu

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.