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V01-12

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Re: V01-12  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2016, 11:08
rahulgandhi91 wrote:
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. Can you please explain, as to why the answer for the aforementioned question is not 'b'.


The post by chetan2u just above yours explains your query.
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New post 26 Mar 2017, 01:11
hi sayantan / chetan,

I read all the posts above, but I still have this query - responsible to (someone) and responsible for (something) are always correct?

I am not sure if this sentence is correct as it sounds awkward to me: The manager is responsible to seven entry level employees

Also, can you help with the list of such idioms?

regards,
shailabh
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New post 02 Apr 2017, 08:19
shailabh wrote:
hi sayantan / chetan,

I read all the posts above, but I still have this query - responsible to (someone) and responsible for (something) are always correct?

I am not sure if this sentence is correct as it sounds awkward to me: The manager is responsible to seven entry level employees

Also, can you help with the list of such idioms?

regards,
shailabh


The difference is about the meaning, not whether the object of preposition is a person or thing. You may be responsible FOR something or someone, but you may be responsible TO someone only.

The sentence you mentioned is wrong. The correct sentence could be:
The manager is responsible for seven entry level employees.
OR
The manager is responsible for taking care of the seven entry level employees.
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New post 16 Jun 2017, 17:42
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. why will be responsible to pay is wrong is still not convincing to me.
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New post 29 Jun 2017, 06:37
I do not agree with you. The first Sentence A - Defines the Original meaning if there is no grammatical error and redundancy in it.

sayantanc2k wrote:
In context of loan, it is practically sensible to consider that the repayment of the loan is the only responsibility of the spouse of the defaulter. Technically there could be other responsibilities, but probably the author of this question is not quite wrong in ignoring them. Consider the following sentences:

" If my father does not pay the loan, I shall have responsibilities that include paying the balance."
" If my father does not pay the loan, I shall be responsible for paying the loan."

In my view, the first sentence, although grammatically correct, is awkward and does not convey the intended the meaning as the second sentence does.



So, here are my issues:
1. We cannot eliminate option A because of a meaning change. Grammar can be a factor, so can be redundancy and illogical meaning, but not the change in meaning.

2. In the explanation of example you quoted, calling it awkward is awkward in itself. Even though OG loves the word Awkward, I'm afraid we need more than that as a solution and this is the Primary Reason why these forums came into existence. So, please explain the awkward thing in A.
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New post 04 Jul 2017, 02:58
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. response A has a different meaning that other sentences, which is why A should be kept.
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New post 16 Sep 2017, 00:34
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation.
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New post 30 Dec 2017, 13:22
I think this is a poor-quality question and I agree with explanation. kindly update option A
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New post 16 Jul 2018, 11:22
I think this is a high-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. The (2) and (3) answer options are not negated properly in the solution ("responsible to" vs "responsibility to"). Please elaborate more on that part.

Also, what's the specific problem with option (2) ?
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New post 23 Jul 2018, 04:45
I think this is a poor-quality question and I agree with explanation. there are printing errors in the question, whcich can be easily checked with help of the answer explanation
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New post 19 Aug 2018, 00:53
I think this is a high-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. the explanation is using "responsibility for" as the correct idiom however the option D is using "responsible for" .
clearly its an error
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New post 04 Feb 2019, 09:14
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

Controversial mortgage laws passed last year state that, at any point during the maturation period of the loan, if the person in whose name the loan is taken is not able to make the payments, that person’s spouse will have responsibilities that include paying the balance.

A. will have responsibilities that include
B. will be responsible to pay
C. is responsible to pay
D. will be responsible for paying
E. will have responsibility to pay

This sentence is confusing because it contains many prepositional phrases nestled within each other. At the core, however, the sentence is testing the ability to recognize the conditional tense created by the word if that begins the series of phrases after the comma; this if causes the underlined portion to need simple present (general rule) or future tense (ceratin future event) in order to agree. The sentence also tests the correct use of the idiomatic verb to be responsible for.
  1. This phrase is wordy and unnecessary.
  2. The usage "responsibility to " is wrong when referring to an action - the correct usage is "responsibility for ".
  3. The usage "responsibility to " is wrong when referring to an action - the correct usage is "responsibility for ".
  4. This option correctly uses the preposition for and the –ing form of the verb to pay, as well as the future tense signaled by the conditional word if.
  5. The usage "responsibility to " is wrong when referring to an action - the correct usage is "responsibility for ".

Answer: D


Hi Bunuel,

I totally agree with the fact that the underlined portion needs to be in simple present or future tense, but the original sentence has "will have responsibilities that include", a phrase that clearly states that there are more than one responsibilities. So, wouldn't the other choices change the intended meaning. Isn't that supposed to be a fatal flaw?

Thanks,
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New post 12 Sep 2019, 09:02
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. I get the explanation and should have gone with my first answer, but i felt the phrase implies there are more responsibilities than paying by removing it you are changing the definition of the sentence. All the other answers change responsibilities to a single one so I chose A despite being wordy and clunky.
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New post 01 Oct 2019, 07:14
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I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. Just to let you know that answer choice A is missing the word 'paying'.
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New post 01 Oct 2019, 07:19
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New post 19 Oct 2019, 03:48
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. Look at the explanation of answer choice C, it does not even contain the phrase it is explaining. C should be right asnwer because It is a law stating something that has to be stated in simple present tense
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New post 21 Oct 2019, 15:52
crashthird wrote:
I think this is a poor-quality question and I don't agree with the explanation. Look at the explanation of answer choice C, it does not even contain the phrase it is explaining. C should be right asnwer because It is a law stating something that has to be stated in simple present tense



Hi. I think you mean a grammar rule when you say "law"?

While there may be a number of items at play in grammar questions, in this case, the issue is the idiom "responsible for" and that is the correct usage. Anything that says "responsible to pay" is not a correct idiomatic expression.
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Re: V01-12   [#permalink] 21 Oct 2019, 15:52

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