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Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose
B. so dense and convoluted they posed
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed
D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed
E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose
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Official Solution:

Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose
B. so dense and convoluted they posed
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed
D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed
E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose


OE from Veritas Prep Your success on Sentence Correction will depend much more on your ability to recognize what is wrong than to recognize what is right. This question offers an excellent example – you know that the structure “so X that Y” is a commonly accepted idiom.

You’ve become accustomed to seeing that structure and so when you see the phrasing “so X as to Y” in choice A and the much-more-familiar “so X that Y” in choice C, your inclination is to quickly eliminate A. But A is the correct answer.

Simply because “so X that Y” is correct does NOT mean that “so X as to Y” is incorrect. Idioms are commonly accepted ways to phrase an idea – but they are not exclusive. There are many – or several, or quite a few – ways to express any idea. And much like there is no “greatest prime number” (ask your instructor for the proof, using what you learned in Arithmetic) there is no “one and only” correct idiom. You can almost always find one more. So you can study idiomatic expressions for months and not have them mastered, and what’s worse – you’ll likely only lead yourself astray from your core competencies like verb tense. In this example, the past-tense in choice C (and B and D) is illogical. It’s wrong. So the not-as-common idiom in A, attached to the “correct” usage of verb tense, provides the correct answer. It’s not what you want to see – but the author knows this and constructed a question in which what you wanted to see was bait.

The authors of these questions are grammar experts and they know this about you – you will never know all of the correct idiomatic expressions, accepted sentence structures, or allowable ways to phrase an idea. So they use them. They take the common phrasing and attach it to an incorrect answer – one containing a major-category error that you should know – and correct that problem in a choice that uses an awkward, unexpected, but still correct structure or idiom. They know that you want to choose “what you know to be right” but that in doing so you’re apt to also wed yourself to something that is hidden, but wrong.


Answer: A
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New post 02 Mar 2016, 09:55
This explanation is so lengthy and filled with details as to make students wonder what they just read .. :)

please get to the point instead of this lengthy explanations Veritas.. And this applies to you videos too .. Thanks for the question ! :)

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New post 12 Jun 2016, 07:05
A very useful point discussed. Thanks for posting this question :)
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New post 06 Aug 2016, 01:02
Hi Expert,

I have a query in this question. I think option choice E is correct instead of option choice A. Here is my reasoning for the same.

Since this sentence mentions some general information about the writings, which is still true, use of past tense is inappropriate. Option B,C and D are eliminated.

Option A : Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.


writings are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle.

the words " so dense as to pose " conveys that purposefully the writing were so dense as to pose hurdles to readers. I disagree with this, as the intention of the author of the writings can't be to pose hurdles.

Option E : dense and convoluted enough as they pose


writings are characterized by sentences dense and convoluted enough as (because) they pose hurdles to readers.

It is giving reason why writings are characterized by sentences dense and convoluted enough.

Kindly clarify
Thanks
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New post 13 Sep 2016, 11:52
Hi

I agree with the explanation given by sahilmalhotra01

The answer should be E

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New post 03 Oct 2016, 13:52
Can't thank you guys enough for this question!!
Walked right into it...

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New post 27 Nov 2016, 06:48
souvik101990, sayantanc2k

If the option C were like this: so dense and convoluted that they pose, then it would be correct, right?

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New post 28 Nov 2016, 11:27
sachin0890 wrote:
souvik101990, sayantanc2k

If the option C were like this: so dense and convoluted that they pose, then it would be correct, right?


Yes, your understanding is correct. "so ... that they pose" or "so... as to pose", both are alright.

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New post 17 Apr 2017, 21:02
sayantanc2k, I recently got this question in the exam and below was my thought process.

I quickly eliminated other options apart from A and C, due no non-idiomatic usages.

Meaning analysis -
A - so dense and convoluted as to pose
The sentences were convoluted and dense because they(questions) wanted to pose a significant hurdle.

C - so dense and convoluted that they posed
Because the sentences were so dense and convoluted, they posed a significant hurdle..

From the above meaning analysis, I rejected choice A.

Please confirm if my understanding is correct..

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New post 09 May 2017, 14:01
In choices B, C, D and E, the pronoun "they" is ambiguous. Does it refer to Immanuel's writings or sentences?

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New post 10 May 2017, 10:03
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E in its entirety: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted enough as they pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

'Enough' mostly means to be to a satisfactory level or extent to do something positive or fulfill a desire or wish. Negative phenomena are unlikely to follow 'enough'. A negative feature like - they pose a significant hurdle - is, therefore, some kind of a paradox. That is the reason the acceptable idiom is -so adjective that - rather than - so adjective enough-. Since it is an idiomatic usage, we cannot question its correctness.
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New post 10 May 2017, 23:46
souvik101990 wrote:
Official Solution:

Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose
B. so dense and convoluted they posed
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed
D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed
E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose


OE from Veritas Prep Your success on Sentence Correction will depend much more on your ability to recognize what is wrong than to recognize what is right. This question offers an excellent example – you know that the structure “so X that Y” is a commonly accepted idiom.


You’ve become accustomed to seeing that structure and so when you see the phrasing “so X as to Y” in choice A and the much-more-familiar “so X that Y” in choice C, your inclination is to quickly eliminate A. But A is the correct answer.

Simply because “so X that Y” is correct does NOT mean that “so X as to Y” is incorrect. Idioms are commonly accepted ways to phrase an idea – but they are not exclusive. There are many – or several, or quite a few – ways to express any idea. And much like there is no “greatest prime number” (ask your instructor for the proof, using what you learned in Arithmetic) there is no “one and only” correct idiom. You can almost always find one more. So you can study idiomatic expressions for months and not have them mastered, and what’s worse – you’ll likely only lead yourself astray from your core competencies like verb tense. In this example, the past-tense in choice C (and B and D) is illogical. It’s wrong. So the not-as-common idiom in A, attached to the “correct” usage of verb tense, provides the correct answer. It’s not what you want to see – but the author knows this and constructed a question in which what you wanted to see was bait.

The authors of these questions are grammar experts and they know this about you – you will never know all of the correct idiomatic expressions, accepted sentence structures, or allowable ways to phrase an idea. So they use them. They take the common phrasing and attach it to an incorrect answer – one containing a major-category error that you should know – and correct that problem in a choice that uses an awkward, unexpected, but still correct structure or idiom. They know that you want to choose “what you know to be right” but that in doing so you’re apt to also wed yourself to something that is hidden, but wrong.


Answer: A


Thanks, this is really helpful tip, I personally use to make this type of mistake a lot. Can you or anyone mark this post with difficulty level of question.

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 05:21
daagh wrote:
E in its entirety: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted enough as they pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

'Enough' mostly means to be to a satisfactory level or extent to do something positive or fulfill a desire or wish. Negative phenomena are unlikely to follow 'enough'. A negative feature like - they pose a significant hurdle - is, therefore, some kind of a paradox. That is the reason the acceptable idiom is -so adjective that - rather than - so adjective enough-. Since it is an idiomatic usage, we cannot question its correctness.


Hi Daagh Sir,
Is 'they' in options ambiguous ? Does it refer to writings or sentences ?
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New post 13 Jun 2017, 08:23
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Apparently, 'they' looks ambiguous since it does not seem clear whether it refers to the writings or to the sentences. However, let us go out of the box a little. The word 'their' definitely refers to his writings. If 'their' refers to his writings, then 'they' also should refer to his writings rather than 'sentences'.
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New post 03 Aug 2017, 11:09
daagh wrote:
E in its entirety: Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted enough as they pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

'Enough' mostly means to be to a satisfactory level or extent to do something positive or fulfill a desire or wish. Negative phenomena are unlikely to follow 'enough'. A negative feature like - they pose a significant hurdle - is, therefore, some kind of a paradox. That is the reason the acceptable idiom is -so adjective that - rather than - so adjective enough-. Since it is an idiomatic usage, we cannot question its correctness.


Hello sir...
I thought the construction "so....that" is right and went for C ASAP.
But after reading the explanation I understood "they" is ambiguous and hence A is the correct answer....
How can I spot on this kind of error when I get such a question among the last 10 questions?
Is it the case that Pronoun> Idioms in order to spot error....

Please give your valuable advice to improve this type of scenarios.... Thanks.........
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New post 03 Aug 2017, 11:11
souvik101990 wrote:
Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose
B. so dense and convoluted they posed
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed
D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed
E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose


Thanks for such a tricky question....Please update the OA...
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Re: V07-24 [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 03:24
souvik101990 wrote:
Official Solution:

Immanuel Kant’s writings, while praised by many philosophers for their brilliance and consistency, are characterized by sentences so dense and convoluted as to pose a significant hurdle for many readers who study his works.

A. so dense and convoluted as to pose
B. so dense and convoluted they posed
C. so dense and convoluted that they posed
D. dense and convoluted enough that they posed
E. dense and convoluted enough as they pose


OE from Veritas Prep Your success on Sentence Correction will depend much more on your ability to recognize what is wrong than to recognize what is right. This question offers an excellent example – you know that the structure “so X that Y” is a commonly accepted idiom.

You’ve become accustomed to seeing that structure and so when you see the phrasing “so X as to Y” in choice A and the much-more-familiar “so X that Y” in choice C, your inclination is to quickly eliminate A. But A is the correct answer.

Simply because “so X that Y” is correct does NOT mean that “so X as to Y” is incorrect. Idioms are commonly accepted ways to phrase an idea – but they are not exclusive. There are many – or several, or quite a few – ways to express any idea. And much like there is no “greatest prime number” (ask your instructor for the proof, using what you learned in Arithmetic) there is no “one and only” correct idiom. You can almost always find one more. So you can study idiomatic expressions for months and not have them mastered, and what’s worse – you’ll likely only lead yourself astray from your core competencies like verb tense. In this example, the past-tense in choice C (and B and D) is illogical. It’s wrong. So the not-as-common idiom in A, attached to the “correct” usage of verb tense, provides the correct answer. It’s not what you want to see – but the author knows this and constructed a question in which what you wanted to see was bait.

The authors of these questions are grammar experts and they know this about you – you will never know all of the correct idiomatic expressions, accepted sentence structures, or allowable ways to phrase an idea. So they use them. They take the common phrasing and attach it to an incorrect answer – one containing a major-category error that you should know – and correct that problem in a choice that uses an awkward, unexpected, but still correct structure or idiom. They know that you want to choose “what you know to be right” but that in doing so you’re apt to also wed yourself to something that is hidden, but wrong.


Answer: A


Thanks for your kind reminder! I make mistakes several times.

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