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V08-01

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2016, 14:08
Hello, everyone, could someone take a look of my understanding of this question:
1, "it" in A doesn't require an antecedent as "It" acts as a place holder to postpone the infinitive "to coutinue"
2, in D, " the outpost..." and "this problem..." are two complete setences connected by a comma, so it is a run-on
3, in E, " a problem..." can be understood as an appositive since "problem" is a abstract noun which can refer to the entire situation or as a absolute phrase modifies the previous sentence.

I personally think although E is grammatically correct, the main clause is problematic, because "have a lack" is not as concise as "lack", A is more acceptable to me.

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 02:40
aaronli wrote:
Hello, everyone, could someone take a look of my understanding of this question:
1, "it" in A doesn't require an antecedent as "It" acts as a place holder to postpone the infinitive "to coutinue"
2, in D, " the outpost..." and "this problem..." are two complete setences connected by a comma, so it is a run-on
3, in E, " a problem..." can be understood as an appositive since "problem" is a abstract noun which can refer to the entire situation or as a absolute phrase modifies the previous sentence.

I personally think although E is grammatically correct, the main clause is problematic, because "have a lack" is not as concise as "lack", A is more acceptable to me.


You are right in that "lack" is more concise than "have a lack". However in A, "it" is not a placeholder, but a personal pronoun that is used in place of "lack of fresh water" rather than "problem". Hence E is better than A.

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New post 04 Sep 2016, 20:35
I think this is a high-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2016, 10:09
ravisarens wrote:
I think this is a high-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.


Please elaborate your doubt specifically, so that we may discuss it properly - I would suggest that you go through the explanations given in this thread in order to see whether you get your answer from them - if you don't, please post your specific doubt.

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2016, 11:35
Option E. The outposts have a lack of fresh water, a problem expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

"a problem expected to continue until reinforcements arrive." is a clause (S+V) right? If this is a clause then it should be separated by a semicolon (;) instead of a comma (,).

I understand everything else is correct, but I discarded this answer because it has a comma followed by a complete sentence.

Can someone please explain?

Thanks,

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2016, 06:56
Option D also is incorrect because it changes the intended meaning of the original sentence.
D) The outposts lacked fresh water, this problem is expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

Per this choice, Outposts lacked fresh water (past tense), and it is not an ongoing problem anymore (as stated in the original sentence. Then D states that the past problem is expected to continue, so it has a contradictory meaning.

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2016, 08:45
Gabyms89 wrote:
Option E. The outposts have a lack of fresh water, a problem expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

"a problem expected to continue until reinforcements arrive." is a clause (S+V) right? If this is a clause then it should be separated by a semicolon (;) instead of a comma (,).

I understand everything else is correct, but I discarded this answer because it has a comma followed by a complete sentence.

Can someone please explain?

Thanks,


No, "a problem expected to continue until reinforcements arrive." is not a clause - it is am absolute phrase: noun + noun modifier.

noun: a problem
modifier: expected to continue.....

There is no verb in this part - "expected" is a past participle, not a verb.

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New post 23 Nov 2016, 22:33
Can anybody please tell me why B is incorrect
which is referring to Lack of water I suppose????

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V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2016, 11:07
Hi suramya26! I can help you with that question.

Let's first check out the meaning in the original sentence structure:

Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts, and it is expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

This sentence is telling us that the scarcity of water is a current issue in the outposts, and this problem is expected to continue in the future until aid arrive.

Lets review option B..

B. Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts, which was expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

There are two errors in this option:
1st Pronoun error: The relative pronoun "which" is incorrectly referring to outposts. Per this choice, it is the outposts and not the lack of fresh water (issue) that is expected to continue until aid arrive. So as a general rule, relative pronouns modify the immediate previous noun (outposts in this case). Lack of fresh water is too far away.
2nd Tense error: The sentence starts with a general present fact. Then it says that before the lack of water happens, there was an expectation that this problem will continue. How can you expected an issue to continue before the issue actually occurs?

Hope the analysis helps!

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New post 04 Jan 2017, 15:26
I think this is a poor-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.

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V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2017, 23:20
Soka wrote:
I think this is a poor-quality question and the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate.



Please let us know your specific query, and why you think that this is a poor quality question. Then we shall be able to address your query / concern effectively.

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2017, 21:44
The question is in the present continuous tense "Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts"
Option D is incorrect because it uses the past tense "lacked", thereby changing the meaning of the question. So only option E is correct.

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V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2017, 02:18
kishankr8 wrote:
The question is in the present continuous tense "Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts"
Option D is incorrect because it uses the past tense "lacked", thereby changing the meaning of the question. So only option E is correct.


In addition, option D is a run-on sentence - two independent clauses are separated by a comma.

(A small correction in your post: The verb "is" is not present continuous as you mentioned, but simple present.)

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New post 09 May 2017, 14:10
E seems more correct when compared to D.

D suggested the problem of "lack of water" happened in the past and is now solved (since we are not using present perfect tense). This does not make sense when combined with the idea that this problem will continue until reinforcements arrive (since the problem has occurred in the past and not happening anymore).

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2017, 16:28
Why cant "it"" refers to "lack of fresh water". After all a pronoun can refer to Noun Phrase as well. In that case Option A make sense. Also given the explanation by you earlier that "it" can greater propensity to go with the subject of the preceding clause the sentence is no longer ambiguous whether "it" is modifying "lack of fresh water " or "problem". Please advise.

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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 12:07
souvik101990 wrote:
Official Solution:

Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts, and it is expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

A. Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts, and it is expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.
B. Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts, which was expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.
C. Lack of fresh water is an ongoing problem in the outposts, and they are expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.
D. The outposts lacked fresh water, this problem is expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.
E. The outposts have a lack of fresh water, a problem expected to continue until reinforcements arrive.

(A) The pronoun it has an unclear antecedent (B) The pronoun which has an unclear antecedent (C) The plural pronoun they could only refer to outposts, which implies that the outposts are expected to continue rather than the problem (D) Run-on sentence. Two independent clauses cannot be joined using a comma only. (E) Correct. "A problem" correctly refers to a lack of fresh water at the outposts; the sentence is concise and correct. It is not necessary to use that, as in choice D.

Answer: E

OE of B is incorrect. The pronoun which has a clear antecedent problem . Remember that which can refer back to any pronoun until we encounter a verb going back and if there are 2 or more pronouns, the verb coming after which will dictate the antecedent.

So, going back from comma, we have 2 nouns - Outposts (Plural) and An ongoing problem (singular). Verb after which is was (singular). Hence, which is referring to An ongoing problem.

The problem with B is inconsistency/change in meaning :arrow: The problem is ongoing and it WAS expected that it will end... INSTEAD OF it IS expected that the problem will end...
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Re: V08-01 [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2017, 22:41
Am I oversimplifying this - Option (d) says "lacked", which is the signifies the "problem" was in the past. However, the sentence means that the problem is continuing to the future. Therefore, as I see it, option (d) is wrong.

In option (a) "it" refers to "lack" - Can't the "lack" continue?

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New post 30 Sep 2017, 12:15
For choice B, what other antecedent can "which" have besides "an "ongoing problem" ? It doesn't make sense for it to refer to "outposts", so doesn't it make "which" correctly refer to "an ongoing problem" when considering it in context?

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Re: V08-01   [#permalink] 30 Sep 2017, 12:15

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