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Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Ratios in GMAT Data Sufficiency  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Ratios in GMAT Data Sufficiency
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We know that ratios are the building blocks for a lot of other concepts such as time/speed, work/rate and mixtures. As such, we spend a lot of time getting comfortable with understanding and manipulating ratios, so the GMAT questions that test ratios seem simple enough, but not always! Just like questions from all other test areas, questions on ratios can be tricky too, especially when they are formatted as Data Sufficiency questions.

Let’s look at two cases today: when a little bit of data is sufficient, and when a lot of data is insufficient.

When a little bit of data is sufficient!

Three brothers shared all the proceeds from the sale of their inherited property. If the eldest brother received exactly 5/8 of the total proceeds, how much money did the youngest brother (who received the smallest share) receive from the sale?

Statement 1: The youngest brother received exactly 1/5 the amount received by the middle brother.

Statement 2: The middle brother received exactly half of the two million dollars received by the eldest brother.

First impressions on reading this question? The question stem gives the fraction of money received by one brother. Statement 1 gives the fraction of money received by the youngest brother relative to the amount received by the middle brother. Statement 2 gives the fraction of money received by the middle brother relative to the eldest brother and an actual amount. It seems like the three of these together give us all the information we need. Let’s dig deeper now.

From the Question stem:

Eldest brother’s share = (5/8) of Total

Statement 1: Youngest Brother’s share = (1/5) * Middle brother’s share

We don’t have any actual number – all the information is in fraction/ratio form. Without an actual value, we cannot find the amount of money received by the youngest brother, therefore, Statement 1 alone is not sufficient.

Statement 2: Middle brother’s share = (1/2) * Eldest brother’s share, and the eldest brother’s share = 2 million dollars

Middle brother’s share = (1/2) * 2 million dollars = 1 million dollars

Now, we might be tempted to jump to Statement 1 where the relation between youngest brother’s share and middle brother’s share is given, but hold on: we don’t need that information. We know from the question stem that the eldest brother’s share is (5/8) of the total share.

So 2 million = (5/8) of the total share, therefore the total share = 3.2 million dollars.

We already know the share of the eldest and middle brothers, so we can subtract their shares out of the total and get the share of the youngest brother.

Youngest brother’s share = 3.2 million – 2 million – 1 million = 0.2 million dollars

Statement 2 alone is sufficient, therefore, the answer is B.

When a lot of data is insufficient!

A department manager distributed a number of books, calendars, and diaries among the staff in the department, with each staff member receiving x books, y calendars, and z diaries. How many staff members were in the department?

Statement 1: The numbers of books, calendars, and diaries that each staff member received were in the ratio 2:3:4, respectively.

Statement 2: The manager distributed a total of 18 books, 27 calendars, and 36 diaries.

First impressions on reading this question? The question stem tells us that each staff member received the same number of books, calendars, and diaries. Statement 1 gives us the ratio of books, calendars and diaries. Statement 2 gives us the actual numbers. It certainly seems that we should be able to obtain the answer. Let’s find out:

Looking at the question stem, Staff Member 1 recieved x books, y calendars, and z diaries, Staff Member 2 recieved x books, y calendars, and z diaries… and so on until Staff Member n (who also recieves x books, y calendars, and z diaries).

With this in mind, the total number of books = nx, the total number of calendars = ny, and the total number of diaries = nz.

Question: What is n?

Statement 1 tells us that x:y:z = 2:3:4. This means the values of x, y and z can be:

2, 3, and 4,

or 4, 6, and 8,

or 6, 9, and 12,

or any other values in the ratio 2:3:4.

They needn’t necessarily be 2, 3 and 4, they just need the required ratio of 2:3:4.

Obviously, n can be anything here, therefore, Statement 1 alone is not sufficient.

Statement 2 tell us that nx = 18, ny = 27, and nz = 36.

Now we know the actual values of nx, ny and nz, but we still don’t know the values of x, y, z and n.

They could be

2, 3, 4 and 9

or 6, 9, 12 and 3

Therefore, Statement 2 alone is also not sufficient.

Considering both statements together, note that Statement 2 tells us that nx:ny:nz = 18:27:36 = 2:3:4 (they had 9 as a common factor).

Since n is a common factor on left side, x:y:z = 2:3:4 (ratios are best expressed in the lowest form).

This is a case of what we call “we already knew that” – information given in Statement 1 is already a part of Statement 2, so it is not possible that Statement 2 alone is not sufficient but that together Statement 1 and 2 are. Hence, both statements together are not sufficient, and our answer must be E.

A question that arises often here is, “Why can’t we say that the number of staff members must be 9?”

This is because the ratio of 2:3:4 is same as the ratio of 6:9:12, which is same as 18:27:36 (when you multiply each number of a ratio by the same number, the ratio remains unchanged).

If 18 books, 27 calendars, and 36 diaries are distributed in the ratio 2:3:4, we could give them all to one person, or to 3 people (giving them each 6 books, 9 calendars and 12 diaries), or to 9 people (giving them each 2 books, 3 calendars and 4 diaries).

When we see 18, 27 and 36, what comes to mind is that the number of people could have been 9, which would mean that the department manager distributed 2 books, 3 calendars and 4 diaries to each person. But we know that 9 is divisible by 3, which should remind us that the number of people could also be 3, which would mean that the manager distributed 6 books, 9 calendars and 12 diaries to each person. As such, we still don’t know how many staff members there are, and our answer remians E.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: Ratios in GMAT Data Sufficiency appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2016, 17:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session
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Whether you are planning to apply to business school, pursue another field of graduate study, or simply want to keep your future options open, you’ve decided to take the GRE. The GRE is a challenging exam and if you are planning on taking the test, you undoubtedly have questions about how to prepare and how to maximize your score.

If you’re looking to jump-start your GRE preparation, register to attend Veritas Prep’s free online GRE Strategy Session. Hosted by Veritas Prep’s GRE Course co-creator, Brian Galvin, this one-hour session will go over the basics of the GRE and show you some of the advanced strategies needed to tackle this exam. In addition, each session concludes with a Q&A session, so you can have your toughest GRE questions answered in live time.

So what are you waiting for? Register to attend the next Veritas Prep GRE Strategy Session now and improve your chances of GRE success!

Wednesday, February 24

7:30pm – 8:30pm (Eastern)

Wednesday, March 23

8:00pm – 9:00pm (Eastern)

Register now!

Want a more focused approach to your GRE preparation? Check out our GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The post Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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7 Resources You Need to Utilize While in College  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2016, 12:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: 7 Resources You Need to Utilize While in College
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One great and often overlooked part of being in college is the wealth of resources you have access to. Some of these resources are exactly what you think of when you think about colleges – big libraries, distinguished professors, expansive dining halls. – but there is also a variety of lesser-known, but equally important services and centers that many colleges have to support their students and contribute to the overall college experience.

It’s a good idea to check these places out, since it is your tuition money that funds them, after all! College is one of the rare times where many of the services available to you will be free (technically nothing in life or college is really free, but that’s besides the point), so take advantage of this while you can. Here is just a sampling of resources found at many universities that I recommend utilizing during your time in college:

Career Counseling

College is about learning, but it’s still not a bad idea to prepare for the job search early. Lots of colleges have career service centers that can connect you with alumni networks, guide you in crafting your résumés, and help you figure out what future career path will be right for you.

Fitness Center

This is a big one for me – gym memberships are really expensive, but colleges give you access to their fitness centers for free. When someone gives you an opportunity to get in shape and stay healthy for free, that’s not something you should turn down. Plus, taking a break from your studies to exercise is a great way to de-stress and have some fun – the pick-up basketball games I’ve played at my school’s gym has been some of the best of my life!

Student Health Center

Again, healthcare is something that will cost a lot more once you get outside of college. Getting sick when you’re separated from your parents can be a jarring experience, so know that you can feel comfortable reaching out to campus health professionals to help you.

Mental Health Counseling

As much fun as college can be, it can also be a very stressful time. Like student health centers, mental health counseling is often offered by colleges as a safe place for students to go to speak to a mental health professional about any difficulties they may be experiencing while at school. Your school will want you to be healthy, mentally as well as physically, so don’t be afraid to seek this service out.

Writing Center

There are more people to turn to than just your professors or TAs when you’re having trouble with a writing assignment. Lots of schools have writing centers, where students and staff will go over your papers with you and give you detailed feedback on how to improve. You’ll probably have to be proactive in making an appointment, though – from my experience, spots at these centers fill up fast!

Library Staff

In high school you may not have talked to your librarians much (mine were awesome, but that’s a different story), but in college, the library staff can be incredibly helpful with research or just with navigating around the facility. The Dewey Decimal System can be a little difficult to use, especially when the library has 4 floors and thousands of books, so utilize your library staff to assist you.

Academic Support

Some colleges offer subject tutoring for students in certain classes, while others hold workshops on subjects such as how to manage homework time in college, steps to succeed on problem sets, and a variety of other topics. All colleges want their students to succeed academically; it’s incumbent on the student to seek out what academic support programs and resources their college has at their disposal, but there will always be options available to you, no matter what school you go to. Trust me, if you search for academic help, you’ll find it!

College is more than just going to school (even though school is very important). Universities have lots of resources to help you in all aspects of your life – use them while you still can, and while they’re still free!

Do you still need help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and register to attend one of our FREE Online College Workshops! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.

The post 7 Resources You Need to Utilize While in College appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Is This Alternative Business School in San Francisco Right For You?  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2016, 17:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Is This Alternative Business School in San Francisco Right For You?
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Today’s activists don’t typically cruise the nation in old vans and grungy bell-bottom pants – the millennial crowd is instead opting to change the “system” from the inside. You can find passionate young adults in nearly every career path, MBA graduates included. This generation is faced with unique and significant issues, and they have responded by flocking to forward-looking organizations and companies. But, what about a forward-looking school? Is there a place for an alternative business school?

In San Francisco, the Presidio Graduate School has been catering to a unique group of business students who want to make a positive impact on the future. The 150 student campus was founded in 2003 and touts itself as a progressive alternative to mainstream business schools. In response to a recent Bloomberg Businessweek student survey, nearly 80% of the participating business school students said they strongly agree that they feel inspired to pursue an ethical future, and this business school may be just the place for them to do so.

The Presidio Graduate School not only offers a specialized MBA in Sustainable Management, they also provide a laid-back atmosphere that is perfect for innovation and idea exchange. After the 2008 financial crisis and various scandals on Wall Street, it is no wonder that MBA students are increasingly drawn to more unconventional, ethical programs such as this.

It is becoming increasingly common to judge how progressive a business school is based on its student body demographics, and the Presidio Graduate School sets the standard high: 56% of its students are female, and roughly 90% of all students go on to work within sustainability roles after graduation. In August 2015, the White House asked the country’s top business schools for a commitment to increase pro-diversity efforts. Unfortunately, the nationwide statistics are not as encouraging as the Presidio Graduate School’s – 0ut of 9,000 MBA graduates, only 29% are female, and a meager 15% of the surveyed business students belonged to a minority ethnicity. The Presidio Graduate School sets an excellent example for schools looking to increase diversity on their campus.

While the Presidio Graduate School is one of the nation’s most progressive business schools, their financial future is uncertain. Small class sizes, combined with a modest tuition could result in an impaired cash flow. They charge less than half of what their competitors do, and have cut other corners to avoid losing sight of their vision, such as renting out all of their campus buildings.

Unlike in most traditional business schools, a majority of the learning that goes on here is done remotely. The average business student at the Presidio Graduate School will only attend a physical class a handful of times per month, and other frills, such as banquets and fancy events, are nowhere to be found. Since approximately 80% of their students are local to the Bay Area, the school hopes that their enrollment will increase as their name gains momentum.

Even though graduating from the Presidio Graduate School means an MBA student will likely earn $40K less per year than their traditional MBA counterparts, that has not stopped the business school from drawing in new students. Ensuring our global and national sustainability is an important task, and as long as there is a demand for progressive MBA programs, schools like the Presidio Graduate School are sure to keep popping up.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Is This Alternative Business School in San Francisco Right For You? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Huge Benefits to Studying in Short Chunks  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2016, 13:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Huge Benefits to Studying in Short Chunks
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Many students wait until the last minute to study for tests or do major projects. Before I get too far in, let me just say that for a long time I was one of those students (and sadly, sometimes I still am). Putting things off is easy to rationalize – after all, if you get the work done eventually, it doesn’t matter when you do it, right? Wrong! Waiting until the last minute is a bad habit and extreme procrastination almost invariably brings down the quality of whatever it is you are trying to accomplish.

On the SAT, putting off studying until a week or two before the test is an all-too-common phenomenon. I know a lot of students who wouldn’t even think about the test until it was already almost upon them. Fun fact: many of those students didn’t do nearly as well as they wanted to.

It’s no secret that in order to do your best on the SAT, you have to put in the time. The test isn’t really about knowledge, but rather, is about being familiar with the questions and knowing how the test operates. With these two topics, cramming is of very little help. You can’t cram familiarity and understanding – you have to be disciplined over an extended and consistent period of time.

My recommendation for how to best manage your time studying for the SAT is to spend the two months leading up to your exam date studying in small, manageable chunks. Spending 30-40 minutes per day, three-four times per week, is a lot more helpful than spending 4 hours on one day the week before the official exam. It’s pretty easy to find 30 minutes of free time in a day; it’s a lot harder to find 4 hours.

This 30-minute chunk method is how I studied, and it had a lot of benefits for me. Here are 3 biggest ones:

  • I felt like I really understood the test. Instead of seeing the SAT as an unpredictable monster, I came to be really familiar with how it worked. Spending a little time with the test on a consistent basis made me more comfortable with the structure and the patterns of the questions, so I knew what to expect on test day.
  • I didn’t feel rushed to learn everything I needed to. Since I started months before my test, I knew that when I found a weak spot, I would have time to fix it. This gave me the confidence to be honest about my shortcomings. I could devote a week to the Writing Section if I found that I was bad at comma usage and still not feel like I was rushed to teach myself geometry. The feeling of having plenty of time made my stress surrounding the test significantly decrease.
  • I found it much easier to focus for a half hour than it was to focus for 4 hours. I don’t know about you, but my attention span really isn’t that long. The best way for me to maximize my study time was to use short intervals of serious focus. Doing full practice tests is important, but if that’s your entire study strategy, you’re likely to get bored and burnt out pretty quickly.
I urge you to resist putting off studying for the SAT – if you start studying early and keep yourself on a regular, manageable study plan, your anxiety about the test will fall while your SAT score will jump.

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.

The post SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Huge Benefits to Studying in Short Chunks appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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All You Need to Know About Using Interest Equations on the GMAT  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2016, 19:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: All You Need to Know About Using Interest Equations on the GMAT
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As an undergraduate, I concentrated in Finance. When I tell people this, they make two unwarranted assumptions: the first is that I work in Finance (I don’t), and the second is that I am a glutton for mathematical punishment (debatable).

The reason people are intimidated by the kinds of compound interest equations we encounter in finance classes is that they look complicated. GMAT test-takers get anxious whenever I introduce this topic in class. But, as with most seemingly abstruse topics, these concepts are far less difficult than they appear at first glance.

Here’s all we really need to know about interest equations: if we’re talking about simple interest, the interest will be the same in every time period, and the equation you assemble will end up being straightforward linear algebra (if you choose to do algebra, that is). If we’re talking about compound interest, we’re really talking about an exponent question. The rest involves a bit of logic and algebraic manipulation.

Look at this official question that many of my students have initially struggled with:

An investment of $1000 was made in a certain account and earned interest that was compounded annually. The annual interest rate was fixed for the duration of the investment, and after 12 years the $1000 increased to 4000 by earning interest. In how many years after the initial investment was made would the 1000 have increased to 8000 by earning interest at that rate?

(A) 16

(B) 18

(C) 20

(D) 24

(E) 30

Looking at this question, the first instinct of most test-takers is to start frantically rummaging through their memory banks for that compound interest formula – there’s no need. Take a deep breath and remind yourself that these questions are just exponent questions involving a bit of algebra. With this in mind, let’s call the factor that the principal is multiplied by in each time period “x”. (If you’re accustomed to working with the formula, “x” is basically standing in for your standard (1 + r/100.) If you’re not accustomed to this formula, feel free to retroactively erase this parenthetical from your memory banks.)

If the principal is getting multiplied by “x” each year, then after one year, the investment will be 1000x. After two years the investment will be 1000x^2. After three years, it will be 1000x^3… and so on. In our problem, we’re talking about an investment after 12 years, which would be 1000x^12. If this value is 4000, we get the following equation: 1000x^12 = 4000 (and file away for now that the exponent represents the number of years elapsed).

Ultimately, we want to know what the exponent should be when the investment is at $8000. If you’re looking at the answer choices now and think that 24 seems just a little too easy, your instincts are sound.

We need to work with 1000x^12 = 4000. Let’s simplify:

Divide both sides by 1000 to get x^12 = 4.  Solving for x seems unnecessarily complicated, so let’s consider our options. x^12 = 4 is the same as x^12 = 2^2, so if we take the square root of both sides, we will get x^6 = 2.

Essentially, this means that every 6 years (the exponent) the investment is doubling, or multiplied by 2. But we want to know how long it will take for that initial $1000 to become $8000, or to be multiplied by a factor of 8.

What can we do to x^6 = 2 so that we have an 8 on the right side? We can cube both sides!

(x^6)^3 = 2^3

x^18 = 8

This means that it will take 18 years to increase the investment by a factor of 8. Therefore, our answer is B.

Alternatively, once we see that the investment doubles every 6 years, we can ask ourselves how many times we need to double an investment to go from $1000 to $8000. Doubling once gets us to $2000. Doubling twice gets us to $4000. Doubling a third time gets us to $8000. So if we double the investment every 6 years, and we need the investment to double 3 times, it will take a total of 6*3 = 18 years.

Takeaway: There are plenty of formulas that could come in handy on the GMAT – just know that a little logic and conceptual understanding will allow you to solve many of the questions that seem to require a particular formula. Memorization has limits that logic and mental agility don’t.

*GMATPrep question courtesy of the Graduate Management Admissions Council.

Plan on taking the GMAT soon? We have GMAT prep courses starting all the time. And be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By David Goldstein, a Veritas Prep GMAT instructor based in Boston. You can read more articles by him here.

The post All You Need to Know About Using Interest Equations on the GMAT appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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3 Points International Candidates Need to Highlight in Their MBA Appli  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2016, 13:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: 3 Points International Candidates Need to Highlight in Their MBA Applications
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International MBA applicants to top programs frequently ask how much they should focus on their home countries in their applications, versus demonstrating their similarities to the typically-admitted domestic student. This is a good question, as balancing between fitting in with one’s target MBA program and standing out by bringing something unique to one’s application is a line that all candidates tread carefully.

An international applicant will usually have more materials to consider adding to their application, given the experience of growing up, studying, and working in another country. Even for second-generation immigrants, the wealth of influences and heritage from another culture could be a rich source of essay topics and passing references to consider. Used correctly, they add character and breadth, enhancing the readability of an application, which can help a candidate stand out from a competitive pool of other accomplished applicants from the same industry and country.

If you are applying to business school as an international applicant, take a look at these three factors you should focus on in your application:

1) Uniqueness

MBA essays are best used to tell a unique personal story that allows readers to understand the candidate’s motivation and goals. As an international candidate, you can use your country’s economic, cultural, or even political situations as an interesting and complementary backdrop to further stand out.

Let’s look at some examples of how this can be done:

  • An applicant managing a business from a growing consumer market could be played up to show the candidate’s potential to be a bridge for companies seeking to enter the lucrative market. This would flow nicely into the applicant’s post-MBA goal of leading a global company’s international unit.
  • An applicant who navigated and hurdled a developing country’s political and regulatory challenges to successfully lead a large-scale project of a foreign entity could use this experience to demonstrate his or her maturity and leadership qualities.
  • Candidates from a country encountering great difficulties could position themselves as people who are in a unique position to give back to their country of origin post-MBA, while also helping open the eyes of the student community to global issues.
These experiences show the potential of candidates to serve as a resource for interesting classroom discussions, enriching the experiences of classmates, while also serving as a future bridge to alumni with interest in their respective countries.

Likewise, a sentence or two identifying strong core values and influences that defined a family’s history and how it inspires the applicant serve she dual purpose of showing a personal side to leave a vivid impression with the Admissions Committee, and demonstrating the candidate’s underlying motivation and personal traits. Executing this precisely will result in a profile that comes across genuinely and stands out from the pack.

Applying the right dose of details and balance between personal sentiments and professional rationality on these topics is key in ensuring your essays stay unique and on track.

2) International Exposure

For international candidates who spent most of their lives in their home countries, it is particularly helpful to mention experiences with exchange programs, international assignments, travels abroad, or at the minimum, working with cross-cultural teams. These do not necessarily have to take up major space – sprinkling in tidbits at appropriate instances will still make for an interesting and engaging read. It also helps demonstrate an international mindset, adaptability, and intellectual curiosity.

Instances of initiating projects and leading teams with international components are also valuable, as these will help show the ability to actively contribute to classroom discussions and group project dynamics. Showcasing your teamwork skills via an international setting in this way will assure the Admissions Committee that you will be able to adjust to life on campus, benefit from their program, and contribute to the experiences of your MBA peers.

3) Confidence!

The content and tone of your overall application should be confident that you are an excellent fit for the program, able to keep pace with the academics and classroom rigors the school requires, and maximize your overall experience. Coming from an environment, school, or firm that is different from the usual sources of MBA candidates, you must ensure that confidence in your intellectual horsepower and personal traits comes through, especially in your essays. Standardized measures, such as a great GMAT score, will also help address this.

Crafting such an application requires honest reflection and self-awareness – most applicants find themselves more focused and motivated after investing the time and effort to do so, thus making the whole exercise a valuable experience, so be sure you take ample time to reflect before beginning your writing process.

Creating a personal story while highlighting your successes handling complex projects or academic accomplishments, and combining this with a post-MBA goal that is both compelling and realistic are the usual ingredients for a strong application, and adding the right international flavor to this recipe will help your candidacy shine even more. Finding the right flow between answering the specific questions directly and adding international elements may be challenging, but successfully pulling it off  will result in a very personal and powerful application package.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Written by Edison Cu, a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for INSEAD.

The post 3 Points International Candidates Need to Highlight in Their MBA Applications appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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GMAT Tip of the Week: Verbal Answers Are Like Donald Trump  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: Verbal Answers Are Like Donald Trump
In the winter/spring of 2016, Donald Trump is everywhere – always on your TV screen, all over your social media feeds, on the tip of everyone’s tongue, and, yes, even lurking in the answer choices on your GMAT verbal section.

Why are verbal answer choices like Donald Trump? Is it that they’re only correct 20% of the time? That they’re very often a lot of boastful verbiage about nothing? Hackneyed comedy aside, there’s a very valid reason and it’s one that Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio learned just last night:

Verbal choices, like Donald Trump, simply MUST be attacked. If you saw last night’s debate (or read any coverage of it) you saw how the two closest challengers changed tactics immensely, verbally attacking Trump all night. The rationale there is that if you let Trump go unchecked, he’s going to attack you and he’s going to get away with his own stump speeches all night. The exact same thing is true of GMAT verbal answer choices. If you don’t attack them – if you’re not actively looking for reasons that they’re wrong – they’ll both beat you tactically and wear you down over the test. You simply must be in attack mode throughout the verbal section.

What does that mean? For almost every answer choice, there’s some reason there why someone would pick it (after all, if no one picks it then it’s just a terrible, useless answer choice). And so if you’re looking for reasons to like an answer choice, you’re going to find lots to like (and in doing so pick some wrong answers) and you’re going to get worn down by keeping wrong answer choices in your “maybe” pile too long. But if, instead, you’re more skeptical about each answer choice, actively looking for reasons not to pick them, that discerning approach will help you more efficiently find correct answers.

Consider the example:

If Shero wins the election, McGuinness will be appointed head of the planning commission. But Stauning is more qualified to head it since he is an architect who has been on the planning commission for 15 years. Unless the polls are grossly inaccurate, Shero will win.

Which one of the following can be properly inferred from the information above?

(A) If the polls are grossly inaccurate, someone more qualified than McGuinness will be appointed head of the planning commission.

(B) McGuinness will be appointed head of the planning commission only if the polls are a good indication of how the election will turn out.

(C) Either Shero will win the election or Stauning will be appointed head of the planning commission.

(D) McGuinness is not an architect and has not been on the planning commission for 15 years or more.

(E) If the polls are a good indication of how the election will turn out, someone less qualified than Stauning will be appointed head of the planning commission.

Here there’s a lot to like about a lot of answer choices:

A seems plausible. We know that McGuinness isn’t the most qualified, so there’s a high likelihood that a different candidate could find someone better (maybe even Stauning). B also has a lot to like (and it’s actually ALMOST perfect as we’ll discuss in a second). And so on. But you need to attack these answers:

A is fatally flawed. You don’t know for certain that a different candidate would appoint anyone other than McGuinness, and you really only know that one person is more qualified (and does he even want the job?). This cannot be concluded. B has that dangerous word “only” in it – remove it and the answer is correct, but “only if the polls are a good indication” is way too far to go. What if the polls are flawed and the underdog candidate just appoints McGuinness, too? The same logic invalidates C (there’s nothing guaranteeing that a different candidate wouldn’t pick McGuinness), and the word “and” makes D all the harder to prove (how do you know that McGuinness lacks both qualities?).

The lesson? Much like John Kasich may find on that same stage, the nicer and more accommodating you are, the more the GMAT walks over you. If you want to give each answer a fair chance, you’ll find that many answers have enough reason to be tempting. So follow the new GOP debate strategy and always be attacking. You didn’t sign up for the GMAT to make friends with answer choices; you signed up to “win.”

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: Verbal Answers Are Like Donald Trump appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: How to Find Composite Numbers on the GMAT  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: How to Find Composite Numbers on the GMAT
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We love to talk about prime numbers and their various properties for GMAT preparation, but composite numbers usually aren’t mentioned. Composite numbers are often viewed as whatever is leftover after prime numbers are removed from a set of positive integers (except 1 because 1 is neither prime, nor composite), but it is important to understand how these numbers are made, what makes them special and what should come to mind when we read “composite numbers.”

Principle: Every composite number is made up of 2 or more prime numbers. The prime numbers could be the same or they could be distinct.

For example:

2*2 = 4 (Composite number)

2*3*11 = 66 (Composite number)

5*23 = 115 (Composite number)

and so on…

Look at any composite number. You will always be able to split it into 2 or more prime numbers (not necessarily distinct). For example:

72 = 2*2*2*3*3

140 = 2*2*5*7

166 = 2*83

and so on…

This principle does look quite simple and intuitive at first, but when tested, we could face problems because we don’t think much about it. Let’s look at it with the help of one of our 700+ level GMAT questions:

x is the smallest integer greater than 1000 that is not prime and that has only one factor in common with 30!. What is x?

(A) 1009

(B) 1021

(C) 1147

(D) 1273

(E) 50! + 1

If we start with the answer choices, the way we often do when dealing with prime/composite numbers, we will get stuck. If we were looking for a prime number, we would use the method of elimination – we would find factors of all other numbers and the number that was left over would be the prime number.

But in this question, we are instead looking for a composite number – a specific composite number – and some of the answer choices are probably prime. Try as we might, we will not find a factor for them, and by the time we realize that it is prime, we will have wasted a lot of precious time. Let’s start from the question stem, instead.

We need a composite number that has only one factor in common with 30!. Every positive integer will have 1 as a factor, as will 30!, hence the only factor our answer and 30! will have in common is 1.

30! = 1*2*3*…*28*29*30

30! is the product of all integers from 1 to 30, so all prime numbers less than 30 are factors of 30!.

To make a composite number which has no prime factor in common with 30!, we must use prime numbers greater than 30. The first prime number greater than 30 is 31.

(As an aside, note that if we were looking for the smallest number with no factor other than 1 in common with 31!, we would skip to 37. All integers between 31 and 37 are composite and hence, would have factors lying between 1 and 31. Similarly, if we were looking for the smallest number with no factor other than 1 in common with 50!, 53 would be the answer.)

Let’s get back to our question. If we want to make a composite number without using any primes until 30, we must use two or more prime numbers greater than 30, and the smallest prime greater than 30 is 31. If we use two 31’s to get the smallest composite number, we get 31*31 = 961 But 961 is not greater than 1000, so it cannot be our answer.

So, let’s find the next prime number after 31 – it is 37. Multiplying 31 and 37, we get 31*37 = 1147. This is the smallest composite number greater than 1000 with no prime factors in common with 30! – the only factor it has in common with 30! is 1. Therefore, our answer is (C).

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: How to Find Composite Numbers on the GMAT appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Re: Veritas Prep Blog  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 17:49
Hey Veritas Prep. I'm facing a quandary and would love some help. I've taken 5 Veritas CATs so far, 3 Manhattan CATs, 1 Kaplan, 1 Economist and 3 GMATPrep CATs (2 free downloadable versions and 1 Exam pack1). My scores have been extremely variable to say the least.
Veritas: 600, 620, 610, 610, 620
Manhattan: 650, 600, 620
Kaplan: 610
Economist: 630
GMATPrep: 620, 640, 730 (V 42 & Q 48)

I'd like to add that I took the first 2 GMATPrep tests in the very beginning and yesterday I took the 3rd in which I scored a 730. This was after an additional 2 months of preparation. Meanwhile I've religiously taken Veritas CATs and have been at a consistent Q 42-43 & V 32. I even took a Veritas the night before i got the 730 on the GMATPrep exam 3.

I have my GMAT in 5 days and I'm wondering whether this 730 on the GMATPrep software is an actual representation of the score I might score on the actual Gmat.

Could someone comment on why they think I saw such a huge jump on the last test whereas I was getting a consistent 620 on Veritas and suddenly on the GMATPrep I got a 730?

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Are Business Schools Becoming Less Global?  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2016, 15:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Are Business Schools Becoming Less Global?
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Many business school students have wistfully considered studying abroad. What could be more idyllic than packing your bags and traveling to a foreign country to earn an MBA while gaining valuable life experience? Especially for students who studied abroad during their undergraduate days, a chance to go global in pursuit of one’s MBA can seem very attractive.

Business schools around the country have recognized this wanderlust and developed international programs for potential students. In fact, so many schools have jumped on this bandwagon, words like “global” and “international” have become nearly meaningless buzzwords in the education market. What was once competitive and trendy is now a monotonous and exhausted marketing campaign, and while there will likely always be a demand for overseas education, it may be wise for local business schools to rethink their strategies.

Have you ever seen two convenience stores engage in a “gas war”? When two comparable businesses offer similar products, the only significant driving factor behind sales is affordability – each organization must continuously slash their prices to stay ahead of their competition. However, by developing unique ways to draw in customers, a business typically does not have to sell products at a loss just to stay afloat.

The same theory can be applied to business schools today. Many campuses out there are trying to be the “superstore” of MBAs, which can have disastrous results. It is more efficient to do a few things extraordinarily well than it is to do everything with mediocrity.

The very first MBA program was developed at Harvard in 1908, ,while overseas, Europe didn’t launch their first pilot MBA program until the 1970s. Despite this late start, research shows that certain European business schools are doing better than some of the top American schools. With this in mind, it is logical to assume that if an American student is considering studying abroad, they will likely enroll in a higher-ranking foreign school.

In addition to the tough competition global business schools already face, they must also endure the cost of operating overseas. Slashing prices back home just to claim bragging rights for international operations simply does not make sense in many cases.

A simple approach to avoiding the traps of globalized education is for business schools to abstain or withdraw from the practice. Business schools that find their niche and offer higher value for local MBA students are likely to be rewarded. There is a slight risk involved, but the potential benefits are tremendous.

While specialized MBAs are definitely in vogue right now, experts do not recommend relying entirely on specialized MBA programs to be successful. Instead, business schools should tweak existing programs to suit the needs of the individual student, in their geographical location, better. For example, business schools in California should cater more to entrepreneurship and technology, while NYC schools are probably better off focusing on banking. Discovering how to provide the most value to their students will allow schools to charge more for a premium MBA program.

International business schools can be an excellent option for students seeking new experiences and connections, however, this is a great example to prove that everything is better in moderation.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Are Business Schools Becoming Less Global? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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SAT Tip of the Week: You Waited Until the Last Minute to Cram for the   [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: SAT Tip of the Week: You Waited Until the Last Minute to Cram for the SAT, Now What?
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It’s the week of the first New SAT and despite the warnings you may have heard from others, you’ve waited until the last minute to begin studying. As with any other test at school, it should come as no surprise that students who participate in last-minute cramming for the SAT are not going to be able to showcase all of their skills on this important exam – they simply aren’t likely to remember any of the information from their cram sessions.

In order to properly prepare for the SAT, a student has to study in a gradual way over a period of months. As such, if you find yourself cramming for the SAT, you should first and foremost consider rescheduling the test. Of course, there’s a fee for rescheduling the SAT, but taking the test without being prepared is likely to be a waste of time – chances are good that you will have to retake the test anyway. However, if you have delayed studying for the test and would still like to take it anyway, there are some last-minute SAT tips that can be of some help. Let’s check out three examples:

Complete a Practice Test

One of the most important elements of last-minute SAT prep is to take a practice test, with a timer actually set for each section in order to get accustomed to finishing in the allotted number of minutes. The results of this practice test will reveal the skills that need work. This is one of those last-minute SAT tips that can make a limited amount of study time all the more effective, and if a student finds that they need to improve several skills, then it’s best for the person to begin with the skill that needs the most improvement.

Focus on the Areas That Need the Most Attention

Another effective last-minute tips for SAT prep is for students to focus their energy and limited time on their weakest subject. For example, you may complete a practice test and see that you need to sharpen your algebra skills. Your first move should then be to find practice problems (either in math textbooks or online), complete the problems, and check your answers. If an answer is incorrect, you should work your way back through the steps of the problem to figure out what went wrong. This may be time-consuming, but you may find that you have made the same type of mistake in several problems, and correcting that mistake could help you improve your overall score on the next SAT practice test you take.

Or, you may examine your practice test results and see that you need to work on your vocabulary skills in the reading section. To improve in this area, you might then look for a list of words commonly found on the exam, and make flashcards with the word on one side of a card and its definition on the other. By practicing with the flashcards, you may be able to absorb a dozen new words (however, you had taken several months to practice with flashcards, you would likely be able to absorb several dozen new words by test day).

Employ Simple Strategies When Completing Practice Questions

One last-minute SAT prep tip is to absorb a few basic test-taking strategies and start putting them into practice. One such basic tip is to eliminate answer options that are obviously incorrect. This will allow you to narrow down the number of possible answers and makes the question seem more manageable. Being able to simplify questions is always a plus on the SAT! Last-minute tips for the math section include drawing the diagrams referred to in geometry problems and writing down the steps of algebra equations in the test booklet. Sometimes, seeing the steps of a problem in black and white can help lead you to the correct answer.

We are proud to help students demonstrate their skills on the SAT. Students who ssigns up for one of our course options benefit from the knowledge and test-taking experience of our professional SAT tutors and have the opportunity to learn many helpful test-taking strategies over a longer period of time. Don’t procrastinate on your preparation; contact the team at Veritas Prep today and get started on the path to mastering the SAT!

Still need to take the SAT? We run a free online SAT prep seminarevery few weeks. And be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The post SAT Tip of the Week: You Waited Until the Last Minute to Cram for the SAT, Now What? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Should You Apply for Your MBA in Round 3 or Wait Until Next Year?  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2016, 18:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Should You Apply for Your MBA in Round 3 or Wait Until Next Year?
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For most applicants who are still considering business school this year, they will be looking to submit their applications in Round 3 or even in Round 4 for their chosen schools. I’m often asked by applicants whether or not they should go ahead and apply at the end of this year’s admissions cycle or wait until Round 1 of next year. Let’s look at the pros and cons of each approach:

Applying in Round 3: Pros

One of the first questions I ask MBA candidates who are considering applying in Round 3, is how set are they on going to school THIS year? Well, if there is some extenuating circumstance that is essentially forcing the applicant’s hand, then let’s go ahead and apply. Applicants that fall into this category can include an international student whose visa is expiring, or someone who was recently laid off from their job.

If you are set on applying in Round 3, the most important tip I can give you is to adjust your school expectations. You might think you have a top ten profile, but seats in this round are limited so you will need to apply to a much wider range of schools in order to ensure you are accepted to at least one of them in Round 3. Also, lower-ranked schools will probably have a higher percentage of seats available than higher ranked ones, especially as waitlists at higher-ranked schools clear and applicants begin to “trade up” from lower ranked schools.

Applying in Round 3: Cons

It’s fairly intuitive that most business schools will have already admitted a majority of their students in their first two rounds of applications. While there is no firm number, you can expect that at least 90% of seats have already been given away by a particular school, so the odds are definitely against you – you’ll have to be a fairly outstanding applicant to have a shot in Round 3, so keep this in mind while crafting your application.

Wait Until Next Year: Pros

For fringe students, I’m a big fan of waiting until next year – especially those who have some kind of hole in their application, such as less than 3 years of work experience, a low GMAT score, a poor GPA or less than stellar job experience. An applicant can use that extra time between now and next year to add quite a bit to their profile. First, there is plenty of time to take a GMAT course and bump up a low score by 50 or more points. Secondly, the applicant can search out new and challenging work assignments or leadership positions that would impress the admissions committee. Finally, the applicant can apply in the Round 1, when there will be plenty of open spots, and have more opportunities for themselves.

Wait Until Next Year: Cons

If you don’t think that your situation will improve over the next year, then you might as well apply to business school now. For example, if your job is so consuming that you don’t think you’ll be able to focus on your application all that more over the next year than you were able to do this year, the extra time might not help you. Additionally, the competition for those seats are not going to get easier as more applicants come to the age where they will be applying to school.

Deciding which round one will apply to business school in is a tough decision for all MBA candidates. Determine which round would be best for you by calling us at 1-800-925-7737 to learn more about our Round 3 Guarantee, and speak with an MBA admissions expert.

Applying to business school? Take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

The post Should You Apply for Your MBA in Round 3 or Wait Until Next Year? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Take Advantage Your Time as a “Partial” Adult  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Take Advantage Your Time as a “Partial” Adult
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I like to call the time that you’re in college “fake adulthood.” You have some responsibilities, you’re more on your own, and life starts to get a little harder. That means life is becoming more like the “real world,” but you’re not quite there yet – the real real world is still years (and a diploma) away.

In college, you have access to “free” resources, built-in support systems, and a room to sleep in; many of you will still be financially supported by your parents, and perhaps most liberating, you will not be completely screwed by messing up or failing a class. The real world (the work world) isn’t affected by some wrong answers you gave on a multiple-choice test in your History of Ancient Greece class (unless, perhaps, you’re planning to become a History of Ancient Greece professor after college).

I don’t mean to say this like it’s a bad thing – college can be a wonderful time in your life, regardless of whether it is the “real world.” What I do mean to say, is you should take advantage of the freedom and the relative lack of consequences that college entails!

There are lots of ways to do this, but two big ones are to take risks and to branch out – go explore the world and explore your own mind. You’re not bogged down by a set 9-5 schedule with rigid responsibilities, so take this opportunity to let your creativity roam free. A day in college can be spent perusing the Iliad, picnicking at a public park, attending a scientific demonstration, or going to a collegiate sporting event (for free!). It’s hard to imagine a teacher or a banker having the schedule flexibility to do all that, especially on a weekday.

In college, you can also take advantage of the fact that you aren’t working full-time to donate some of your energy to causes that you might not have as much time to later in life. There are often built-in networks on college campuses for you to get involved in volunteer work right away. Community organizations also usually love energetic, youthful volunteers, so there is bound to be a plethora of places near your campus eager to take on some extra help.

Perhaps most importantly, you can use your time in college to work hard and develop skills for responsible adulthood so you aren’t thrust into the ring with no experience. Practice cashing checks, doing laundry, buying groceries, etc. – that way, when you actually have to do live on your own, you’ll be more prepared and less nervous about making that jump into reality. It is too easy to pretend that these daily tasks of adulthood are too far in the future to be worried about, and by overcoming that self-deception and gradually preparing yourself for the routine of adult living, you will build habits that will serve you well for a lifetime to come.

College is a unique time for many reasons – during your time there, you are on the cusp of adulthood but still have ways to exercise youthful freedom. Take advantage of this by exploring yourself and the world, all while preparing yourself to soon take a step into that oh-so-scary place – the real world.

Do you still need help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and register to attend one of our FREE Online College Workshops! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.

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How to Get Your Boss to Write You a Great Letter of Recommendation  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2016, 17:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: How to Get Your Boss to Write You a Great Letter of Recommendation
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One of the only external sources of information within an MBA application package is the voice of one’s recommendations. For such an important component, it is critical to arm your recommender with enough information to allow them to successfully draft their evaluation of the time you have worked together.

Now, let us consider the recommendation process from the side of the recommender – they are typically more senior working professionals who manage multiple people, and they are often very busy and a bit ignorant of the MBA application process, which is obviously no fault of their own. So the more you can inform and shepherd them through the process the better your ultimate evaluation will be.

Let’s discuss a few ways you can better support the evaluation process for your recommenders:

Timelines

This might be one of the most important reasons to help your recommenders. Remember, YOU are applying to school, not them. It is in your best interest to make sure they are clear on all dates and deadlines – a missed deadline can equate to you missing a target admissions round. I even like to give recommenders a hard deadline in advance of the real one, so even if they miss your self-imposed deadline, which many unfortunately will, you will still be in good shape. All recommendations are due the same time as the applications, so schedule accordingly.

Personal Information

Although we like to assume our supervisors know everything about us, sometimes they need a bit of a reminder. As such, it is wise to create a package for them highlighting your accomplishments during your time in the organization, and working with them in particular. Included in this package, you should also state your motivation for pursuing an MBA and any other relevant information about your career trajectory. The more connected your recommenders are to your future success, the better your recommendation will be.

School Information

In your recommender package, you should also provide some information on each of the schools you are applying to. Every school has a unique culture and approach to graduate business education, so try to communicate this to your recommender. Such information could potentially help them shape the content of your evaluation to fit that particular school. Also, make sure your recommenders are clear on the specific questions and recommendation protocols at each school – remember, many are uninformed when it comes to the process, so make their work as easy and straightforward as possible.

Take ownership of your MBA application process by supporting your recommender in the areas above. By following these tips, you will ensure your recommendation remains an area of strength for your candidacy.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can find more of his articles here.

The post How to Get Your Boss to Write You a Great Letter of Recommendation appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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GMAT Tip of the Week: The Biggie Smalls Sufficiency Strategy  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2016, 13:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: GMAT Tip of the Week: The Biggie Smalls Sufficiency Strategy
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If it’s March, it must be Hip Hop Month in the Veritas Prep GMAT Tip of the Week space, where this week we’ll tackle the most notorious GMAT question type – Data Sufficiency – with some help from hip hop’s most notorious rapper – Biggie Smalls.

Biggie’s lyrics – and his name itself – provide a terrific template for you to use when picking numbers to test whether a statement is sufficient or not. So let’s begin with a classic lyric from “Big Poppa” – you may think Big is describing how he’s approach a young lady in a nightclub, but if you listen closely he’s actually talking directly to you as you attack Data Sufficiency:

“Ask you what your interests are, who you be with. Things to make you smile; what numbers to dial.”

“What numbers to dial” tends to be one of the biggest challenges that face GMAT examinees, so let’s examine the strategies that can take your score from “it was all a dream” to sipping champagne when you’re thirsty.

Biggie Smalls Strategy #1: Biggie Smalls

Consider this Data Sufficiency problem:

What is the value of integer z?

1) z is the remainder when positive integer y is divided by positive integer (y – 1)

2) y is not a prime number

Statistically, more than 50% of respondents in the Veritas Prep practice tests incorrectly choose answer choice A, that Statement 1 alone is sufficient but Statement 2 alone is not sufficient. Why? Because they’re not quite sure “what numbers to dial.” People know that they need to test numbers – Statement 1 is very abstract and difficult to visualize with variables – so they test a few numbers that come to mind:

If y = 5, y – 1 = 4, and the problem is then 5/4 which leads to 1, remainder 1.

If y = 10, y – 1 = 9, so the problem is then 10/9 which also leads to 1, remainder 1.

If they keep choosing random integers that happen to come to mind, they’ll see that pattern hold – the answer is ALMOST always 1 remainder 1, with exactly one exception. If y = 2, then y – 1 = 1, and 2 divided by 1 is 2 with no remainder. This is the only case where z does not equal 1, but that one exception shows that Statement 1 is not sufficient.

The question then becomes, “If there’s only one exception, how the heck does the GMAT expect me to stumble on that needle in a haystack?” And the answer comes directly from the Notorious BIG himself:

You need to test “Biggie Smalls,” meaning that you need to test the biggest number they’ll let you use (here it can be infinite, so just test a couple of really big numbers like 1,000 and 1,000,000) and you need to test the smallest number they’ll let you use. Here, that’s y = 2 and y – 1 = 1, since y – 1 must be a positive integer, and the smallest of those is 1.

The problem is that people tend to simply test numbers that come to mind (again, over half of all respondents think that Statement 1 is sufficient, which means that they very likely never considered the pairing of 2 and 1) and don’t push the limits. Data Sufficiency tends to play to the edge cases – if you get a statement like 5 < x < 12, you can’t just test 8, 9, and 10 – you’ll want to consider 5.00001 and 11.9999. When the GMAT gives you a range, use the entire range – and a good way to remind yourself of that is to just remember “Biggie Smalls.”

Biggie Smalls Strategy #2:  Juicy

In arguably his most famous song, “Juicy”, Biggie spits the line, “Damn right I like the life I live, because I went from negative to positive and it’s all…it’s all good (and if you don’t know, now you know).”

There, of course, Biggie is reminding you that you have to consider both negative and positive numbers in Data Sufficiency problems. Consider this example:

a, b, c, and d are consecutive integers such that the product abcd = 5,040. What is the value of d?

1) d is prime

2) a>b>c>d

This problem exemplifies why keeping Big’s words top of mind is so crucial – difficult problems will often “satisfy your intellect” with interesting math…and then beat you with negative/positive ideology. Here it takes some time to factor 5040 into the consecutive integers 7 x 8 x 9 x 10, but once you do, you can see that Statement 1 is sufficient: 7 is the only prime number.

But then when you carry that over to Statement 2, it’s very, very easy to see 7, 8, 9, and 10 as the only choices and again see that d = 7. But wait! If d doesn’t have to be prime – primes can only be positive – that allows for a possibility of negative numbers: -10, -9, -8, and -7. In that case, d could be either 7 or -10, so Statement 2 is actually not sufficient.

So heed Biggie’s logic: you’ll like the life you live much better if you go from negative to positive (or in most cases, vice versa since your mind usually thinks positive first), and if you don’t know (is that sufficient?) now, after checking for both positive and negative and for the biggest and smallest numbers they’ll let you pick, now you know.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The post GMAT Tip of the Week: The Biggie Smalls Sufficiency Strategy appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
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Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: The Case of a Correct Answer Despite Inco  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2016, 19:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: The Case of a Correct Answer Despite Incorrect Logic!
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It is common for GMAT test-takers to think in the right direction, understand what a question gives and what it is asking to be found out, but still get the wrong answer. Mistakes made during the execution of a problem are common on the GMAT, but what is rather rare is going with incorrect logic and still getting the correct answer! If only life was this rosy so often!

Today, we will look at a question in which exactly this phenomenon occurs – we will find the flaw in the logic that test-takers often come up with and then learn how to correct that flaw:

If a motorist had driven 1 hour longer on a certain day and at an average rate of 5 miles per hour faster, he would have covered 70 more miles than he actually did. How many more miles would he have covered than he actually did had he driven 2 hours longer and at an average rate of 10 miles per hour faster on that day?

(A) 100

(B) 120

(C) 140

(D) 150

(E) 160

This little gem (and it’s detailed algebra solution) is from our Advanced Word Problems book. We will post its solution here, too, for the sake of a comprehensive discussion:

Method 1: Algebra

Let’s start with the basic “Distance = Rate * Time” formula:

D = R*T ……….(I)

From here, the first theoretical trip can be represented as D + 70 = (R + 5)(T + 1), (the motorist travels for 1 extra hour at a rate of 5 mph faster), which can be expanded to D + 70 = RT + R + 5T +5.

We can then eliminate “D” by plugging in the value of “D” from our equation (I):

RT + 70 = RT + R + 5T + 5, which simplifies to 70 = R + 5T + 5 and then to 65 = R + 5T ……….. (II)

The second theoretical trip can be represented as (R+10)(T+2), which expands to RT + 2R + 10T + 20 (not that we only have an expression since we don’t know what the distance is).

The two middle terms (2R + 10T) can be factored to 2(R+5T), which allows us to use equation (II) here:

RT + 2(R+5T) + 20 = RT + 2(65) + 20 = RT + 150.

Since the original distance was RT, the additional distance is 150 more miles, or answer choice D.

We totally understand that this solution is a bit convoluted – algebra often is. So, understandably, students often look for a more direct logical solution.

Here is one they sometimes employ:

Method 2: Logic (Incorrect)

If the motorist had driven 1 hour longer at a rate 5 mph faster, then his original speed would be 70 miles subtracted by the extra 5 miles he drove in that hour to get 70 – 5 = 65 mph. If he drives at a rate 10 mph faster (i.e. at 65 + 10 = 75) * 2 for the extra hours, he/she would have driven 150 miles extra.

But here is the catch in this logic:

The motorist drove for an average rate of 5 mph extra. So the 70 includes not only the extra distance covered in the last hour, but also the extra 5 miles covered every hour for which he drove. Hence, his original speed is not 65. Now, let’s see the correct logical method of solving this:

Method 3: Logic (Correct)

Let’s review the original problem first. Say, speed is “S” mph – we don’t know the number of hours for which this speed was maintained.

STEP 1:

S + S + S + … + S + S = TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED

In the first hypothetical case, the motorist drove for an extra hour at a speed of 5 mph faster. This means he covered 5 extra miles every hour and then covered another S + 5 miles in the last hour. The underlined distances are the extra ones which all add up to 70.

STEP 2:

S + S + S + … + S + S = TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED

+5 +5 +5 + … + 5 + 5 = +70

In the second hypothetical case, in which the motorist drove for two hours longer at a speed of 10 mph faster,  he adds another 5 mph to his hourly speed and covers yet another distance of “S” in the second extra hour. In addition to S, he also covers another 10 miles in the second extra hour. The additional distances are shown in red  in the third case – every hour, the speed is 10 mph faster and he drove for two extra hours in this case (compared with Step 1).

STEP 3:

S + S + S + … + S + S + S + S = TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED

+5  +5  +5 + …  +5  +5  +5 = +70

+5  +5  +5 + …  +5  +5  +5 + 10 = +70 + 10

Note that the +5s and the S all add up to 70 (as seen in Step 2). We also separately add the extra 10 from the last hour. This is the logic of getting the additional distance of 70 + 70 + 10 = 150. It involves no calculations, but does require you to understand the logic. Therefore, our answer is still D.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Karishma, a Computer Engineer with a keen interest in alternative Mathematical approaches, has mentored students in the continents of Asia, Europe and North America. She teaches the GMAT for Veritas Prep and regularly participates in content development projects such as this blog!

The post Quarter Wit, Quarter Wisdom: The Case of a Correct Answer Despite Incorrect Logic! appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Breaking Down Your MBA Deferred Enrollment Options  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2016, 19:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: Breaking Down Your MBA Deferred Enrollment Options
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Many candidates start considering business school very early in their professional careers, while others start investigating even earlier as undergraduate students. Some of the top MBA programs in the world provide options for these eager college students to begin the application process for business school early.

For college students, this is an opportunity to earn an early business school admit – before even graduating college – from some of the top MBA programs in the world. This option is usually accompanied by some requirement to complete a few years of work experience, but some programs will allow students to matriculate immediately following undergrad.

Let’s explore a few of the top deferred enrollment programs and how they differ from each other:

Yale SOM

Yale’s deferred enrollment program is called the Yale Silver Scholars Program. This program is unique because it allows graduating students to begin their MBA immediately after graduation. For young applicants looking to complete their MBA at a top business school as soon as possible, this is a great option.

Silver Scholars is structured as a three-year program: the first year of the program builds business fundamentals through a core set of classes, with the second year taking students off campus through an extended internship that serves to supplement that lack of work experience Silver Scholars possess, while adding a more practical component to the program. In the final year of the program, students utilize the Yale electives curriculum to personalize their education and pursue unique areas of interest.

Harvard Business School

Harvard’s deferred enrollment program is called the HBS 2+2 Program. It is one of the most well-known and longest running of the MBA deferred enrollment programs. In the 2+2 program, participants must complete two years of HBS-approved post-undergrad work prior to matriculation. If you’re already a grad student don’t fret – with the 2+2 program, as long as you have not held a full-time work position you are still eligible to apply.

Stanford

The Stanford MBA Deferred Enrollment Program offers applicants the opportunity to directly enroll in their program or pursue full-time work experience for between one and three years prior to matriculation. The school then ultimately decides which program is optimal for the student and reserves the right to place the applicant appropriately.

As always, research is the key, so go beyond secondary research and connect with current program participants and admissions officers to get a feel for which program best addresses your development needs and whether deferred enrollment makes sense for you and your career goals.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can find more of his articles here.

The post Breaking Down Your MBA Deferred Enrollment Options appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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3 Things We Learned From the First New SAT (That You Should Know, Too!  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2016, 14:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: 3 Things We Learned From the First New SAT (That You Should Know, Too!)
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After months of speculation and conversation, the first iteration of the “new SAT” was administered this past week and weekend by the College Board.   While previous administrations of the SAT have been marred by historic snowstorms and typos on testing booklets, it seems that the big news around this test is the test itself.

With a new scoring scale and updated content, the new SAT is attempting to test more college-relevant skills. Gone are obscure vocabulary and penalties for guessing incorrectly. Rather, students are seeing a much heavier focus on algebra, context-based reading questions and grammar.

We spoke with several test takers and collected anecdotal feedback from this weekend’s test and wanted to share some interesting findings and advice:

1) For students who did not register for the (optional) essay, there was an additional 20 minute experimental section, or fifth section. The purpose of the section was to pre-test new potential test questions and it will not impact test takers’ scores in any way. However, test takers also won’t receive any feedback on how they performed on this section. Students who completed the essay did not take this section.

While there was some information circulated online about the experimental section, College Board didn’t indicate when the section would be administered, if it would be a regular part of the SAT moving forward, or how many markets and test centers  delivered test forms containing the extra section.

Lesson for students: Prepare for the unexpected! While extra questions might create additional anxiety and fatigue, at the end of the day, they will not make or break a student’s score. If the section happens to be delivered before the rest of the exam, give the questions an honest attempt and think of it as a warm-up.  If College Board shifts to incorporating experimental questions into the already established sections, it still should not impact study plans or test day strategy. Students are already planning on three hours of testing (and 154 questions), and in most cases, experimental questions are camouflaged well enough that they cannot be distinguished from actual questions that count.

2) Algebra counts! As advertised, algebra plays a prominent role on the new SAT, and overall, the math questions seemed to reflect the topics presented in the College Board’s previously released practice tests. Advanced concepts such as circles, trigonometry and imaginary numbers will be tested, but won’t make up the bulk of the questions on the test. For older, non-traditional students who are a little rusty in math, a strong refresher is probably in order.

Lesson for students: If you’ve been paying attention in high school math classes, nothing should be unfamiliar. However, pacing is going to be a challenge, especially on the non-calculator section, so practice techniques that will make you more efficient. Veritas Prep teaches students several strategies that can be leveraged to solve questions that are reasoning-based and more “SAT-focused” rather than pure math-focused. Often, you can leverage answer choices or manipulate questions to make the math much simpler (and quicker).  Above all, be careful not to fall back onto school-oriented math strategies just because they’re familiar – they might get you the right answer, but you may be wasting time that could be spent on the tougher math questions.

3) Use evidence and context to your advantage (on the verbal!) While the new test has eliminated obscure vocabulary, the College Board has introduced new questions that ask you to find evidence to support answers. The good news is that you’re rewarded for knowing the answer as well as  finding the evidence because these questions comes in pairs (so two points for the price of one)!

Lesson for students: If you don’t love the topics, it may be a struggle. Passages are a little longer, and there are 10-11 questions per passage so you don’t have the luxury of being able to skip a passage and hope for something more interesting on the next page.  However, pacing on the reading passages seems to be less of an issue on the new test since students can gain some momentum by focusing on one topic (and passage) rather than having to switch gears (and passages) more frequently. This should also help with college thinking as you’ll often have more time to do a deeper dive into one single topic.

While the new test likely still has some kinks to work out, it seems that the experimental section was the biggest surprise of the weekend. And if the biggest surprise was one that didn’t technically count, then that’s probably better than anything Mother Nature (or a rogue printer) could throw at students.

At Veritas Prep, we remain committed to ensuring our students are well prepared for anything the SAT might present.  We encourage you to learn more at a free online seminar soon! And be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

By Joanna Graham

The post 3 Things We Learned From the First New SAT (That You Should Know, Too!) appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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What is the TOEFL Exam?  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2016, 15:00
FROM Veritas Prep Blog: What is the TOEFL Exam?
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There are many acronyms involved with applying for the most important graduate business education acronym of them all: the MBA. From GPAs to GMATs, all of these acronyms can get pretty confusing. One such important acronym that often flies under the radar is the TOEFL.

Now why is the TOEFL so important? Well, it is a required component of any international application. From a foundational perspective, the TOEFL is a standardized exam used to assess the English language proficiency of non-native speakers.

The overall TOEFL score is used to ensure that international students will be able to handle a predominantly English-speaking educational environment. As such, the TOEFL scores international applicants on their communicative English skills, such as their listening, reading, writing, and speaking ability. The test also evaluates international applicants on the basis of their enabling skills, like grammar, pronunciation, oral fluency, spelling, vocabulary and written discourse abilities.

Like the GMAT, there is no “passing” or “failing” score for the TOEFL – an acceptable score is one that is above the minimum threshold for your target program. Some programs do not have a minimum score required, so be sure to research what the requirements are for your schools of interest before preparing for this test. For those programs that do require a minimum TOEFL score, the magic number is a score of 100 at most schools, with higher requirements at outlier programs like Booth, Harvard Business School, and INSEAD.

Some programs will also waive the TOEFL requirements for some applicants, but this is usually due to having ample past work experience where English is the official working language or having been educated at the primary, secondary or undergraduate level from an English speaking institution. Waivers for the TOEFL will be evaluated on a case by case and school by school basis, so make sure to do your due diligence here if you are considering a waiver.

The TOEFL is a necessary part of the business school application process, so if you are an international applicant, make sure you know the requirements at your target programs and proceed accordingly.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can find more of his articles here.

The post What is the TOEFL Exam? appeared first on Veritas Prep Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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What is the TOEFL Exam?   [#permalink] 09 Mar 2016, 15:00

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