GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 10 Jul 2020, 05:56

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Current Student
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 158
GMAT 1: 610 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 690 Q50 V32
GMAT 3: 710 Q50 V36
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jan 2019, 03:09
HI VeritasKarishma


Please have a look at this question.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/is-a-positiv ... l#p2206226


Regards
Nitesh
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 07 Jul 2018
Posts: 42
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jan 2019, 02:16
Hi,

I am facing this silly doubt which is bothering me in DS questions.

Is \(\sqrt{n}\) = n
or +n or -n?

To think of it \(\sqrt{81}\) , we can square 9 and -9 to get it.
But after reading many sources and watching youtube videos, they say it can only be positive.

Secondly, if it is only positive then following is contradictory

\(\sqrt{X^2}\) = |X|
Then X can take both positive and negative values, so this is contradictory.


I was solving a question and I struggled with this equation
\(p^2\)= \((q+1)^2\)
What would this give?

Thanks.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 Nov 2018
Posts: 2
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jan 2019, 02:28
Hello Karishma,

I have a very general question on how to simplify arithmetic computations.
I have to compute 0.17*(26.4/1.65). To simplify it I did rewrite it as: 17*264/1650

Now the solution I found to simplify this calculation further more is the following: (17)*(3*8*11)/(3*5*11*10)

Do you have any tips on how to quickly find these factors of the products I want to simplify? I tried it using prime factorization but it takes too long....

Thanks

Posted from my mobile device
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jan 2019, 05:31
nitesh50 wrote:
HI VeritasKarishma


Please have a look at this question.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/is-a-positiv ... l#p2206226


Regards
Nitesh


Guess Gladiator59 has already sorted it out for you. Let me know if something is still unclear.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Current Student
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 158
GMAT 1: 610 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 690 Q50 V32
GMAT 3: 710 Q50 V36
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Jan 2019, 03:52
Hi VeritasKarishma

https://gmatclub.com/forum/a-coin-made- ... 98446.html

You have posted a reply for this question.
In your solution you have asked:
(Think what would happen if it was given that volume of aluminium was twice the volume of silver)

IMO the ratio for the weight will still remain the same.
Aluminium=10 Silver=20
ON the other hand 2/3 of volume of the coin will be aluminium.

Then we can use proportions :
If 2/3 Volume of C1 = 10gm
Then volume of C2= 10*1.5*volume of c2/volume of c1

This have me an answer of 30gm.

Am I correct here?

Regards
Nitesh
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Jan 2019, 02:18
nitesh50 wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma

https://gmatclub.com/forum/a-coin-made- ... 98446.html

You have posted a reply for this question.
In your solution you have asked:
(Think what would happen if it was given that volume of aluminium was twice the volume of silver)

IMO the ratio for the weight will still remain the same.
Aluminium=10 Silver=20
ON the other hand 2/3 of volume of the coin will be aluminium.

Then we can use proportions :
If 2/3 Volume of C1 = 10gm
Then volume of C2= 10*1.5*volume of c2/volume of c1

This have me an answer of 30gm.

Am I correct here?

Regards
Nitesh


That solution can be modified if we modify the question like this:

A coin made of alloy of aluminum and silver measures 2 x 15 mm. If the weight of the coin is 30 grams and the volume of aluminum in the alloy is twice that of silver, what will be the weight of a coin measuring 1 x 30 mm made of pure aluminum if silver is twice as heavy as aluminum?

Let's consider the first coin:
2*Volume of Silver = Volume of Aluminium
Weight of Silver = 2* Weight of Aluminum for equal volume.

Since the volume of silver is half but its weight is twice for equal volume so for half the volume, the weight of the two will become equal.

Total weight is 30 gms. So silver must be 15 gms and aluminum must be 15 gms.

Volume of first coin \(=\pi∗(15/2)^2∗2=(225/2)∗\pi\)

Volume of second coin \(=\pi∗(15)^2∗1=(225)∗\pi\)

Volume of second coin is twice the volume of the first coin. If volume of aluminium in the first coin is V, the volume of the first coin is (3/2)V. The volume of the second coin is 3V. Since it is all Aluminium, volume of Aluminium in the second coin is 3V. Since weight of Aluminum of weight V was 10 gms, weight of Aluminum of volume 3V will be 30 gms.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Current Student
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 158
GMAT 1: 610 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 690 Q50 V32
GMAT 3: 710 Q50 V36
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jan 2019, 10:11
Hi VeritasKarishma

If a fair 6-sided die is rolled three times, what is the probability that exactly one 3 is rolled?


A. 25/216

B. 50/216

C. 25/72

D. 25/36

E. 5/6


Total ways in which a 6-sided die can be rolled three times = 6*6*6 = 216

To get exactly one 3, there are three ways:
A 3 on the first roll and non 3 on other two rolls. This can be done in 1*5*5 = 25 ways.
The 3 could be on the second or third roll too. So total favorable cases = 25*3 = 75

Required Probability = 75/216 = 25/72





This is one of your solutions for the question.
I request your advice on this question and probability in general.

SO in this question:
I went about it in this way:

Total cases: 216

Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15

Total cases: 135
which is wrong.

I dont know why/where I am going wrong.

Second problem:
I have been scoring above Q50 on all veritas mocks but I am really struggling with probability. There are some pretty basic stuff that confuse me (such as the question above). I have the most problems when I have to choose and order is important. In those cases, I am generally wrong.
Where can I work on these specific problem?
Is there any resource/article I can use?

Looking forward to your reply.

Regards
Nitesh
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2019, 04:05
nitesh50 wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma

If a fair 6-sided die is rolled three times, what is the probability that exactly one 3 is rolled?


A. 25/216

B. 50/216

C. 25/72

D. 25/36

E. 5/6


Total ways in which a 6-sided die can be rolled three times = 6*6*6 = 216

To get exactly one 3, there are three ways:
A 3 on the first roll and non 3 on other two rolls. This can be done in 1*5*5 = 25 ways.
The 3 could be on the second or third roll too. So total favorable cases = 25*3 = 75

Required Probability = 75/216 = 25/72





This is one of your solutions for the question.
I request your advice on this question and probability in general.

SO in this question:
I went about it in this way:

Total cases: 216

Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15

Total cases: 135
which is wrong.

I dont know why/where I am going wrong.

Second problem:
I have been scoring above Q50 on all veritas mocks but I am really struggling with probability. There are some pretty basic stuff that confuse me (such as the question above). I have the most problems when I have to choose and order is important. In those cases, I am generally wrong.
Where can I work on these specific problem?
Is there any resource/article I can use?

Looking forward to your reply.

Regards
Nitesh



Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

---- I don't get this. You have taken 5 cases for second roll and 4 cases for 3rd roll so all distinct cases are already covered.
So you have 20 cases.

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15


A can be chosen in 5 ways (1/2/4/5/6). So 5 ways.

Total = 20 + 5 = 25 ways with 3** arrangement.
You will have another 25 for *3* and another 25 for **3.

In all, we will have 75 cases.

But why would you split them anyway? 3** - the second and the third roll can take any of 5 values so 5*5 = 25 ways.
Same for *3* and **3 so total 75 ways.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Current Student
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 158
GMAT 1: 610 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 690 Q50 V32
GMAT 3: 710 Q50 V36
Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2019, 04:17
VeritasKarishma wrote:
nitesh50 wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma

If a fair 6-sided die is rolled three times, what is the probability that exactly one 3 is rolled?


A. 25/216

B. 50/216

C. 25/72

D. 25/36

E. 5/6


Total ways in which a 6-sided die can be rolled three times = 6*6*6 = 216

To get exactly one 3, there are three ways:
A 3 on the first roll and non 3 on other two rolls. This can be done in 1*5*5 = 25 ways.
The 3 could be on the second or third roll too. So total favorable cases = 25*3 = 75

Required Probability = 75/216 = 25/72





This is one of your solutions for the question.
I request your advice on this question and probability in general.

SO in this question:
I went about it in this way:

Total cases: 216

Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15

Total cases: 135
which is wrong.

I dont know why/where I am going wrong.

Second problem:
I have been scoring above Q50 on all veritas mocks but I am really struggling with probability. There are some pretty basic stuff that confuse me (such as the question above). I have the most problems when I have to choose and order is important. In those cases, I am generally wrong.
Where can I work on these specific problem?
Is there any resource/article I can use?

Looking forward to your reply.

Regards
Nitesh



Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

---- I don't get this. You have taken 5 cases for second roll and 4 cases for 3rd roll so all distinct cases are already covered.
So you have 20 cases.

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15


A can be chosen in 5 ways (1/2/4/5/6). So 5 ways.

Total = 20 + 5 = 25 ways with 3** arrangement.
You will have another 25 for *3* and another 25 for **3.

In all, we will have 75 cases.

But why would you split them anyway? 3** - the second and the third roll can take any of 5 values so 5*5 = 25 ways.
Same for *3* and **3 so total 75 ways.



Hi VeritasKarishma
I don't get this. You have taken 5 cases for second roll and 4 cases for 3rd roll so all distinct cases are already covered. So you have 20 cases.

What I was trying to do is this:

3AB: Find the number of combinations and find the ways the can be arranged in an ordered pair.
For instance:
312 321 123 are different possibilities.
Hence, 3 A B = 20 possibilities and this can be arranged in 3! ways. Hence 120 possibilities.
Similarly, 3 A A= 5 possibilities and this can be arranged in 3 ways. Hence 15 possibilities.

Regards
Nitesh
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Feb 2019, 01:40
nitesh50 wrote:
VeritasKarishma wrote:
nitesh50 wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma

If a fair 6-sided die is rolled three times, what is the probability that exactly one 3 is rolled?


A. 25/216

B. 50/216

C. 25/72

D. 25/36

E. 5/6


Total ways in which a 6-sided die can be rolled three times = 6*6*6 = 216

To get exactly one 3, there are three ways:
A 3 on the first roll and non 3 on other two rolls. This can be done in 1*5*5 = 25 ways.
The 3 could be on the second or third roll too. So total favorable cases = 25*3 = 75

Required Probability = 75/216 = 25/72





This is one of your solutions for the question.
I request your advice on this question and probability in general.

SO in this question:
I went about it in this way:

Total cases: 216

Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15

Total cases: 135
which is wrong.

I dont know why/where I am going wrong.

Second problem:
I have been scoring above Q50 on all veritas mocks but I am really struggling with probability. There are some pretty basic stuff that confuse me (such as the question above). I have the most problems when I have to choose and order is important. In those cases, I am generally wrong.
Where can I work on these specific problem?
Is there any resource/article I can use?

Looking forward to your reply.

Regards
Nitesh



Desired:
3AB: (If A and B are different)
total cases: 5 *4=20
now since all numbers are different. the total number of combinations possible is: 3! *20= 120

---- I don't get this. You have taken 5 cases for second roll and 4 cases for 3rd roll so all distinct cases are already covered.
So you have 20 cases.

3AA (if a is same): A can be 1,2,4,5,6 Combinations possible: 3!/2!=3 i.e 15


A can be chosen in 5 ways (1/2/4/5/6). So 5 ways.

Total = 20 + 5 = 25 ways with 3** arrangement.
You will have another 25 for *3* and another 25 for **3.

In all, we will have 75 cases.

But why would you split them anyway? 3** - the second and the third roll can take any of 5 values so 5*5 = 25 ways.
Same for *3* and **3 so total 75 ways.



Hi VeritasKarishma
I don't get this. You have taken 5 cases for second roll and 4 cases for 3rd roll so all distinct cases are already covered. So you have 20 cases.

What I was trying to do is this:

3AB: Find the number of combinations and find the ways the can be arranged in an ordered pair.
For instance:
312 321 123 are different possibilities.
Hence, 3 A B = 20 possibilities and this can be arranged in 3! ways. Hence 120 possibilities.
Similarly, 3 A A= 5 possibilities and this can be arranged in 3 ways. Hence 15 possibilities.

Regards
Nitesh


Nitesh, you are using basic counting principle on last two digits (to arrange - also called slots method by some) and then using it again by arranging.

3AB

When there are 5 ways to get A and 4 to get B, it includes
312 and 321.
When you arrange using 3!, you are counting these two cases again!

Don't use this method. Look at my solution.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Aug 2018
Posts: 19
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Feb 2019, 07:07
Hi Karishma. I have read ur post on weighted averages and simply loved it. However when m applying ur method for the following question the answer comse out incorrect.

Last year, all registered voters in Kumannia voted either for the Revolutionary Party
or for the Status Quo Party. This year, the number of Revolutionary voters increased
10%, while the number of Status Quo voters increased 5%. No other votes were cast.
If the number of total voters increased 8%, what fraction of voters voted Revolutionary
this year?

My answer is 3/5 however the actual answer is 11/18. Could u plzz guide?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Aug 2018
Posts: 19
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Feb 2019, 06:50
VeritasKarishma wrote:
pankajpatwari wrote:
Hi Karishma. I have read ur post on weighted averages and simply loved it. However when m applying ur method for the following question the answer comse out incorrect.

Last year, all registered voters in Kumannia voted either for the Revolutionary Party
or for the Status Quo Party. This year, the number of Revolutionary voters increased
10%, while the number of Status Quo voters increased 5%. No other votes were cast.
If the number of total voters increased 8%, what fraction of voters voted Revolutionary
this year?

My answer is 3/5 however the actual answer is 11/18. Could u plzz guide?


The 5% and 10% increase is on the initial number of R voters and S voters.
wR/wS = (5 - 8)/(8 - 10) = 3/2

The initial numbers increased by 10% and 5%.
So new ratio became [3*(11/10)] / [2*(21/20)]
The new R/S = 3.3/2.1 = 11/7
Fraction of voters who voted R = 11/(11+7) = 11/18


Thanks for your prompt response..but i don't get the part "The initial numbers increased by 10% and 5%.
So new ratio became [3*(11/10)] / [2*(21/20)]"..Could u plz elaborate on this?

Thank You & Regards,
Pankaj
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Feb 2019, 09:42
pankajpatwari wrote:
VeritasKarishma wrote:
pankajpatwari wrote:
Hi Karishma. I have read ur post on weighted averages and simply loved it. However when m applying ur method for the following question the answer comse out incorrect.

Last year, all registered voters in Kumannia voted either for the Revolutionary Party
or for the Status Quo Party. This year, the number of Revolutionary voters increased
10%, while the number of Status Quo voters increased 5%. No other votes were cast.
If the number of total voters increased 8%, what fraction of voters voted Revolutionary
this year?

My answer is 3/5 however the actual answer is 11/18. Could u plzz guide?


The 5% and 10% increase is on the initial number of R voters and S voters.
wR/wS = (5 - 8)/(8 - 10) = 3/2

The initial numbers increased by 10% and 5%.
So new ratio became [3*(11/10)] / [2*(21/20)]
The new R/S = 3.3/2.1 = 11/7
Fraction of voters who voted R = 11/(11+7) = 11/18


Thanks for your prompt response..but i don't get the part "The initial numbers increased by 10% and 5%.
So new ratio became [3*(11/10)] / [2*(21/20)]"..Could u plz elaborate on this?

Thank You & Regards,
Pankaj



Sure. Consider this -
The ratio of initial number of R voters and S voters is 3:2. So say there are 3x number of R voters and 2x number of S voters.

This year, number of R voters increased by 10% so that became 3x + 3x*(10/100) = 3x*(11/10)
This year, number of S voters increased by 5% so that became 2x + 2x*(5/100) = 2x*(21/20)

So the new ratio becomes 3x*(11/10) / 2x*(21/20) = 11/7
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Aug 2018
Posts: 19
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Feb 2019, 06:38
Hi Karishma... Once again thanks for your response..However i don't understand one thing..The ratio of 3:2 for initial number of R & S voters has been already calculated by you taking into consideration increase of 10%, 5% & 8% as shown below:
wR/wS = (5 - 8)/(8 - 10) = 3/2

Once u obtain the above ratio, then you are again taking into consideration increase of 10% & 5% and obtaining the final ratio of 11/7??

Am i not understanding the question right???

Thanking in anticipation for your patience.

Regards,
Pankaj
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2019, 03:26
pankajpatwari wrote:
Hi Karishma... Once again thanks for your response..However i don't understand one thing..The ratio of 3:2 for initial number of R & S voters has been already calculated by you taking into consideration increase of 10%, 5% & 8% as shown below:
wR/wS = (5 - 8)/(8 - 10) = 3/2

Once u obtain the above ratio, then you are again taking into consideration increase of 10% & 5% and obtaining the final ratio of 11/7??

Am i not understanding the question right???

Thanking in anticipation for your patience.

Regards,
Pankaj


An increase is calculated on original values. The weights will be the original values.

This post explains this concept: https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2014/1 ... -averages/

8% * Initial Number of R & S voters = (5% * Initial Number of R voters) + (10% * Initial Number of S voters)

So wA and wB would be initial number of voters.

When we say the percentage increase on X is this and percentage increase on Y is that, and then find the average percentage increase, we calculate that on X and Y. So the ratio wA/wB that we get is the original ratio. We need to bump it up if we need the new ratio.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 Nov 2017
Posts: 32
Location: India
GPA: 3.87
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2019, 08:09
Hi Karishma,
A certain characteristic in a large population has a distribution that is symmetric about the mean m. 68 percent of the distribution lies within one standard deviation d of the mean and 95 percent of the distribution lies within two standard deviation d of the mean. When the students’ average score of a certain class is 80 pts and standard deviation is 5 pts, 90 pts lies in what percent?
A. 68% B. 72% C. 84% D. 88% E. 97.5%
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 Nov 2017
Posts: 32
Location: India
GPA: 3.87
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2019, 08:18
Hi Karishma,
A rectangular solid has the dimension of 24 by 20 by 18. If John will wrap the rectangular solid in a heat reserving material with uniform width of 1, what is the volume of the heat reserving material?
A. 2,600 B. 2,700 C. 2,800 D. 2,900 E. 3,000
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 12 Jul 2017
Posts: 221
Location: India
Schools: ISB '21 (A)
GMAT 1: 570 Q43 V26
GMAT 2: 690 Q50 V32
GPA: 3.8
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2019, 21:27
Hello VeritasKarishma Ma'am,

I got this question in my practice test On Veritas:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/a-nonprofit- ... 64907.html
As per my solution I got the answer as E. Could you please explain my doubt as stated below:

As per the given statement, the question says there are more directors than leaders. Does this mean that
i) per group made directors are more than leaders
OR
ii) all over directors are more than leaders

I interpreted second as true and if it so then for ii) DS statement we can infer two leaders or even 4 leaders making option B as false. Could you please help with the flaw in my understanding?

Regards,
Rishav
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 Feb 2019
Posts: 1
Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2019, 21:42
If a>0, b<0 and c>a, which of the following must be positive?
A.a/b minus b/c divided by c-b
B.b/a minus c/b divided by a-b
C.c/b minus a divided by a-c
D. a×b×c divided by c+b
E. None of these.
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10664
Location: Pune, India
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Feb 2019, 08:09
SHAHED1097 wrote:
If a>0, b<0 and c>a, which of the following must be positive?
A.a/b minus b/c divided by c-b
B.b/a minus c/b divided by a-b
C.c/b minus a divided by a-c
D. a×b×c divided by c+b
E. None of these.


Shahed1097, your question is ambiguous in this form. Please send me the link of the post where the actual question is put up. If not on the forum, please put up a screenshot from the original source. Also, I request you to give me the source of the question to ensure that it is reliable and relevant.
Besides, if some step of the solution trips you up, it will be good if you point that out so that I can focus on that. Else, if you are requesting for my interpretation of the question and method of solving, I am fine with that too.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math   [#permalink] 27 Feb 2019, 08:09

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11    Next  [ 209 posts ] 

Veritas Prep PS Forum Expert - Karishma - Ask Me Anything about Math

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





cron

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne