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John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery
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Author:  Bunuel [ 04 Jun 2021, 00:30 ]
Post subject:  John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.


A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction

B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction

C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction


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Author:  Bunuel [ 07 Jun 2021, 00:15 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

OFFICIAL EXPLANATION



John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.


A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction

Incorrect.

This answer choice is grammatically incorrect. The plural subject Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe does not agree with the singular verb epitomizes.

What helps us identify this question as a Subject Verb Agreement question as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

    A plural subject made up of singular nouns connected by and

Also, this answer is stylistically flawed. The word epitomizes means about the same as the words the symbol of, which creates redundancy.



B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction

Incorrect.

Although this answer choice appears to correct the original mistake by changing the original plural subject (Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe) to a singular subject (Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe), it simultaneously changes the singular verb epitomizes to the plural epitomize, and thus actually repeats the Subject Verb Agreement mistake. Furthermore, the corrected sentence creates a new Subject Verb Agreement mistake: the singular subject Miss Marple does not agree with the plural verb deserve.

What helps us identify this question as a Subject Verb Agreement question as well as identify the mistake is the following Stop Sign:

    A complex long subject / long distance between subject and verb

Also, this answer choice repeats the redundancy of the original sentence. The word epitomizes means about the same as the words the symbol of, which creates redundancy.



C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection

Incorrect.

Although this answer choice resolves the redundancy of the original sentence (by eliminating one of the redundant pair of words epitomizes the symbol of) it repeats the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake. The plural subject Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe does not agree with the singular verb is.

In addition, this answer choice changes the meaning of the original sentence by replacing the word deduction with the word detection. These words do not mean the same thing.



D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction

Incorrect.

Although this answer choice corrects the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake, by changing the singular verb epitomizes to the plural epitomize, it repeats the redundancy of the original sentence: epitomize means about the same as the symbol of.

In addition, this answer choice is further stylistically flawed. Replacing the four-word phrase to be the definitive with the seven-word phrase embodies the very essence and spirit of creates another redundancy.



E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction

In addition to correcting the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake in the sentence, by changing the singular verb epitomizes to the plural epitomize, this answer choice also addresses the stylistic issue of redundancy created by the phrase epitomizes the symbol of in the original sentence. Being the symbol of X and epitomizing X is the same thing, so using them both is redundant - the corrected sentence eliminates the redundancy by using only one of these phrases.


Author:  sumitkrocks [ 04 Jun 2021, 02:52 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction
Subject verb error - Subject "Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe" require plural verb

B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction
Verb for subject "Sherlock Holmes" should be singular - Eliminate

C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection
Same issue as highlighted in A

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction
looks fine - Hold it

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction
the clause "Sherlock home and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction" is just not good rather they can epitomize symbol

Between D and E, D is better framed and presents good comparison.

D is the answer IMO

Author:  Sumi1010 [ 04 Jun 2021, 02:53 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

The actual sentence -
John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective
whereas
Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.

In this sentence, "Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe" i.e. plural subject can't have verb "epitomizes".

Let's eliminate one-by-one.

A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes[ the symbol of British deduction
S-V disagreement.
B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction
S-V disagreement. "Sherlock Holmes" is singular and can't have verb "epitomize".
C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection
S-V disagreement. "Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe" i.e. plural subject can't have verb "IS"
D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction
Epitomize = to be a great example of i.e. symbolise something .
Thus, "epitomize the symbol of X " is incorrect.
"epitomize X" is good.

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction
Correct.

IMO E

Author:  swim2109 [ 04 Jun 2021, 03:30 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.

A very good Question in my opinion. Took 1:15 mins.

Error: Subject verb agreement issue with the usage of 'epitomizes'. It should be epitomize as plural subjects (sherlock and his pipe). Eliminate A, Eliminate B as subject now singular and epitomizes should be used.

In C, British detection is distorting the meaning.

Between D & E (it was tough)

I chose D because it conveys the meaning correctly. In E, I think the usage of 'is the definitive English detective' is unidiomatic (or seems odd) as definitive cant be used for a person. Mostly, 'Definitive' is used with conclusions/decisions I guess. However, I do think 'epitomize the symbol' is a bit long.

A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction

B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction seems a bit long.

C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction

Please some expert comment on this.

Author:  Adambhau [ 04 Jun 2021, 07:02 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.


A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction --> S-V agreement error

B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction --> S-V agreement error

C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection --> S-V agreement error

D vs. E tough, I selected E because it looks more concise version.

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction

Author:  saghosh1 [ 04 Jun 2021, 08:54 ]
Post subject:  John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

Bunuel wrote:
John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.


A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction

B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction

C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction



(A), (B), and (C) have subject-verb agreement error. We can neglect those 3 options.

Between (D) and (E),
(D) has a better comparison and maintains good parallelism
embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives vs epitomize the symbol of British deduction

(E) has a weird comparison
is the definitive English detective vs epitomize British deduction

(D) IMO

Author:  Codebug4it [ 04 Jun 2021, 15:01 ]
Post subject:  John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

Answer: E

A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction
=> INCORRECT
1. Subject-verb issue - use of the singular verb 'epitomizes' for the plural 'Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe'
2. the redundancy - 'epitomizes' and 'the symbol of'


B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction
=> INCORRECT
1. Subject-verb issue - use of the plural verb 'deserve' for the singular 'Miss Marple'
2. the redundancy - 'epitomize' and 'the symbol of'


C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection
=> INCORRECT Subject-verb issue - use of the singular verb 'is' for a plural 'Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe'

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction
=> INCORRECT
1. the redundancy - 'epitomize' and 'the symbol of'
2. verbose sentence


E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction
=> CORRECT.
1. This sentence fixes the Subject-verb issue - use of the plural verb 'epitomize' for a plural 'Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe'
2. eliminates the redundancy of 'epitomize' and 'the symbol of'



Please let me know if there are any mistakes in the analysis.

Author:  atulpatil [ 04 Jun 2021, 17:38 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

Close call between D and E.

Option D:

Although this answer choice corrects the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake, by changing the singular verb epitomizes to the plural epitomize, it repeats the redundancy of the original sentence: epitomize means about the same as the symbol of. So, here, EPITOMIZE is enough. "EPITOMIZE as symbol" usage is redundant.

Also, "embodies the very essence and spirit of" creates wordiness.

Option E:

In addition to correcting the original Subject Verb Agreement mistake in the sentence, by changing the singular verb epitomizes to the plural epitomize, this answer choice also addresses the issue of redundancy created by the phrase "epitomizes the symbol of" in the original sentence.

Being the symbol of X and epitomizing X is the same thing, so using them both is redundant - the corrected sentence eliminates the redundancy by using only one of these phrases.

IMO E

Author:  TarunKumar1234 [ 04 Jun 2021, 23:24 ]
Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery novels, to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction.

A. to be the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomizes the symbol of British deduction -> "epitomizes" is incorrect. We have two points, Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe, so, we need plural verb.

B. deserve the title of the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes, with his famous pipe, epitomize the symbol of British deduction -> "Sherlock Holmes....epitomize" is incorrect. We need Singular verb.

C. to be the definite English detective, but Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is the symbol of British detection -> "Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe is" is incorrect. We need plural verb.

D. embodies the very essence and spirit of English detectives whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize the symbol of British deduction -> "epitomize the symbol of", no need for "the symbol of". Incorrect.

E. is the definitive English detective whereas Jane thinks Sherlock Holmes and his famous pipe epitomize British deduction -> This is better.

So, I think E. :)

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Post subject:  Re: John thinks Miss Marple, heroine of Agatha Christie's murder mystery

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