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Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing
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Author:  Vercules [ 28 Mar 2013, 03:12 ]
Post subject:  Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing season typically reduce a vineyard's yield, because the grapes stay relatively small. In years with such weather, wine producers can make only a relatively small quantity of wine from a given area of vineyards. Nonetheless, in regions where wine producers generally grow their own grapes, analysts typically expect a long, hot, dry spell late in the growing season to result in increased revenues for local wine producers.

Which of the following, if true, does most to justify the analysts' expectation?


(A) The lower a vineyard's yield, the less labor is required to harvest the grapes.

(B) Long, hot, dry spells at the beginning of the grape-growing season are rare, but they can have a devastating effect on a vineyard's yield.

(C) Grapes grown for wine production are typically made into wine at or near the vineyard in which they were grown.

(D) When hot, dry spells are followed by heavy rains, the rains frequently destroy grape crops.

(E) Grapes that have matured in hot, dry weather make significantly better wine than ordinary grapes.

Author:  GMATRockstar [ 11 Mar 2021, 01:54 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing


Author:  hariprasad [ 20 Apr 2013, 00:35 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

itsmeabhi99 wrote:
Can someone explain the problem with A?

I find the following issue with E. As per E, the wine will be better after a hot dry weather but it fails to support how it will generate higher revenue? Does it implicitly expect that the better wine will be sold at a higher price thus bringing higher revenue for wine sellers?


Argument is talking about increasing the REVENUES.. Not about reducing the EXPENSES.. This makes A a loser..

A and C imply that Expenses can be reduced.. What we need is justification for increased Revenues..

Author:  aditya8062 [ 28 Mar 2013, 03:24 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

my pick is E
premise is :In years with such weather, wine producers can make only a relatively small quantity of wine from a given area of vineyards
conclusion is :Nonetheless, in regions where wine producers generally grow their own grapes, analysts typically expect a long, hot, dry spell late in the growing season to result in increased revenues for local wine producers.

revenue can be increased by either increasing quantity or quality and E is giving us that reason that even if qty might have reduced ,the quality of this wine will result for the increased revenue !!

Author:  itsmeabhi99 [ 01 Apr 2013, 15:40 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

Can someone explain the problem with A?

I find the following issue with E. As per E, the wine will be better after a hot dry weather but it fails to support how it will generate higher revenue? Does it implicitly expect that the better wine will be sold at a higher price thus bringing higher revenue for wine sellers?

Author:  Survival [ 02 Apr 2013, 13:12 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

itsmeabhi99 wrote:
Can someone explain the problem with A?

I find the following issue with E. As per E, the wine will be better after a hot dry weather but it fails to support how it will generate higher revenue? Does it implicitly expect that the better wine will be sold at a higher price thus bringing higher revenue for wine sellers?


The problem with A is that you must assume that 'less required labor' means 'less demand for labor', which in turn might imply that 'less money is spent on labor' if 'demand for labor stays the same and the price of labor doesn't increase'.

The problem with E is that you must assume that higher quality wine 'is sold for more'.

Life is much easier with E:)

Author:  bkhan [ 18 Nov 2013, 13:27 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

Another reason why A is wrong is the following

In hot season the size of the grape is reduced, this doesn't mean at all that the labor required will also be reduced since the work needed is still the same.

Author:  AnishPassi [ 21 Aug 2022, 04:08 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

bkhan wrote:
Another reason why A is wrong is the following

In hot season the size of the grape is reduced, this doesn't mean at all that the labor required will also be reduced since the work needed is still the same.


What I understood from the post is that the OP believes option A is not true according to the passage, and thus we should reject it.

If I understood that correctly, the OP missed a very important part of the question stem: “ if true”.

Our job is not to evaluate the validity of the answer choices. Our job is to accept them as true and then check if they answer the question. So, such reasoning to reject an answer choice in this question is wrong.

Author:  ChiranjeevSingh [ 28 Aug 2022, 21:33 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

Understanding the Passage


Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing season typically reduce a vineyard’s yield, because the grapes stay relatively small.

Long period of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing season generally reduces a vineyard’s produce.

How does the produce go down?

The grapes stay relatively small. (it’s not about fewer grapes; it’s about the size of the grapes)

In years with such weather, wine producers can make only a relatively small quantity of wine from a given area of vineyards.

The statement talks about the years which have hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing season.

In those years, wine producers can make only a comparatively small quantity of wine per a given area of vineyards.

Nonetheless, in regions where wine producers generally grow their grapes, analysts typically expect a long, hot, dry spell late in the growing season to result in increased revenues for local wine producers.

“Nonetheless” indicates a contrast. We can expect something contrary to the previous statement in this statement.

Analysts generally expect such hot, dry weather to lead to increased revenue for local wine producers.

So, the expectation is that such hot, dry weather is beneficial for local wine producers.

This is in contrast to the previous statement in which it seemed that this weather is not beneficial for the wine producers since such weather reduces the amount of wine per area of vineyards.

The GIST

Overall, the passage presents a paradoxical situation.

Even though a given type of weather reduces the amount of wine produced per a given area of vineyards, this weather is expected by analysts to lead to increased revenues for local wine producers.

(One reason why this can happen is that reduction in production of wine increases the price of wine signficantly. As a result, wine producers make more money out of a small quantity of wine.)

The question stem asks for an option that does most to justify the analyst’s expectation. Thus, we’re looking for an option that supports that hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing season will lead to increased revenues for winemakers.


The Evaluation



(A) The lower a vineyard's yield, the less labor is required to harvest the grapes.

Incorrect. I believe that people who mark this option forget that we’re looking for an option that indicates “increased revenues” and NOT “increased profits”.

This option talks about less labor - this can indicate lower costs and perhaps more profits. However, this option nowhere indicates “increased revenues”.

Let’s say that the analysts’ expectations were around “increased profits”. Would this option be correct then?

No. This option would still be incorrect.

The following version of the option would be correct in case of “increased profits”:

A lower vineyard's yield will SIGNIFICANTLY lower the labor required to harvest the grapes.

In other words, for this option to indicate “increased profits”, the costs would need to go down more than proportionately to revenues. If revenues and costs go down in the same proportion, the profits too have to go down.

(B) Long, hot, dry spells at the beginning of the grape-growing season are rare, but they can have a devastating effect on a vineyard's yield.

Incorrect. Option B is irrelevant.

The option talks about the spells at the beginning of the season; the argument is about the spells at the end of the season.

How rare or frequent the long hot, dry spells at the beginning of the season are is irrelevant. Also, how devastating they are is irrelevant.

(C) Grapes grown for wine production are typically made into wine at or near the vineyard in which they were grown.

Incorrect. This option gives us information about where the grapes are made into wine; it says that grapes are made into wine at or near the vineyard in which the grapes are grown. In other words, the grapes are not converted into wine in a faraway location.

However, where this conversion takes place is irrelevant to the analysts’ expectation.

(D) When hot, dry spells are followed by heavy rains, the rains frequently destroy grape crops.

Incorrect. This option talks about specific times when hot, dry spells are followed by heavy rains. In such times, the grape crops are frequently destroyed.

However, what happens in these times is not relevant.

We’re concerned with why long hot, dry spells lead to increased revenues for winemakers.

(E) Grapes that have matured in hot, dry weather make significantly better wine than ordinary grapes.

Correct. This option indicates that hot, dry spells at the end of the grape-growing season lead to better wine.

Does better wine mean more revenues?

NOT necessarily.

However, more likely than not. (Ceteris paribus, we can expect better wine to fetch more revenues.)

It’s important to be aware that we’re not looking for surety that hot, dry weather will lead to increased revenues for local wine producers. We’re looking for an option that supports/strengthens this idea.

Author:  EtaCarnia [ 29 Aug 2022, 22:48 ]
Post subject:  Re: Prolonged spells of hot, dry weather at the end of the grape-growing

Hi ,

hope someone could guide me here.

what is an ideal time to solve an CR question in GMAT exam.? For me right now its around 2-2.30 min per CR question.

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