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GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in
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Author:  Bunuel [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.


 


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Author:  Bunuel [ 12 Jul 2022, 09:30 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022: The histories of many cultures in Alondia

Bunuel wrote:
The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.


 


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Manhattan Prep Official Explanation:

Step 1: Identify the Question
The words most strongly supports in the question stem indicate that this is a Strengthen the Argument question.

Step 2: Deconstruct the Argument
The argument mentions that a story about an explosion is common to the many remote cultures in the oceanic region of Alondia but that there are some discrepancies among the accounts. No geological evidence has been found to support the veracity of the story. While some scholars have inferred from this that the accounts were purely symbolic, the author concludes the opposite: Given that all of the stories cite an explosion, there is a strong likelihood that such an explosion actually occurred.

Step 3: Pause and State the Goal
Because this is a Strengthen question, look for an answer that supports the position that these stories recount an actual explosion. For instance, because this is a cause-and-effect argument (the author’s position is that an actual explosion led to the stories in these cultures), be on the lookout for answers that eliminate alternative causes as to how the story could have become commonplace across the different islands.

Step 4: Work From Wrong to Right
(A) If anything, this answer adds some doubt to the author’s position, as it implies that some of the stories about an explosion could actually be recounting some other kind of disaster rather than an explosion itself.

(B) On its surface, this answer looks like it might bolster the author’s position, as a large wave could have resulted from whatever caused the explosion. However, this element of the story is only present in a small number of the stories. The author’s logic is that the explosion likely occurred because it is a common element across all of the stories. Something that occurred in only a small number of stories doesn’t support that logic.

(C) If anything, this answer might make it less likely that a volcanic explosion that could be heard from many of the islands occurred, as it seems that Alondia’s islands might be spread farther apart than several hundred miles. This choice doesn’t do anything to support the author’s claim that there was some sort of loud explosion.

(D) This answer is an opposite trap, lending support to the position that such stories are symbolic rather than literal. That is not this author’s position.

(E) CORRECT. One possible weakener for this argument would be if the explosion story in all of these cultures had been copied from one original story, as this would provide an alternate cause for its prevalence among the cultures of Alondia. If however, as this answer makes clear, there was no contact among these different cultures during the timeframe in question, it is somewhat more likely that these isolated islands did witness a large explosion.

Author:  sanjitscorps18 [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:23 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Bunuel wrote:
The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.


 


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(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.
This does the opposite by saying that it was an actual explosion that was heard by these people

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.
Irrelevant

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.
This suggests the possibility that everyone in that area might not have heard and explosion and hence does not support the argument

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.
References to deities do not confirm these people heard the explosion independently

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.
Correct. This confirms that despite having no contact between these groups of people they have written the same account hence there must have been a high possibility of them hearing an explosion independently of each other.

IMHO Option E

Author:  mainbhiankit [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:31 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Quote:
The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.



What do the researchers suggest?
Quote:
Such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need.


What's the basis for this suggestion?
Quote:
geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts


What's the author's conclusion?
Quote:
these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars


Why would the author conclude that? What's the logical jump?
The geologists were looking for the wrong thing or the lack of evidence isn't conclusive proof.


Option A covers this really well and lends support to the author's argument.
Think about it. The stimulus only talks about geologists searching for proof of volcanic eruption or asteroid impact. What if it was an earthquake or a landslide, or something else? Maybe people didn't literally mean the word explosion.

Hence, A is the right answer imo.

Author:  acf840 [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:39 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Correct choice is E.
We need to strengthen the argument that stories recount an actual explosion and they are not just symbolic.

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster. - If it refers to any kind of disaster than it might be true that everyone is referring to different disasters and there is not an actual explosion - weakens the argument

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion. - If only small number of stories are including a large wave, that means the explosions might be different in different stories.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source. - volcanic eruptions were already ruled out. Doesn't affect the argument anyway.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities. - Actually weakens the argument. If the explosion is referring to the deities than there was not an actual explosion

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years. - Strengthens the argument. They do not have contact with each other, and even then they are referring to the same sounds, it implies that there might have been an actual explosion. Meets our strengthening criteria.

Author:  Sushil117 [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:39 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.
only weakens the argument . incorrect

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.
not really a strong support

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.
since the geological area is very large,this weakens the argument . incorrect


(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.
close but seem more like a trap.hold on to it

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.
correct. if this were true and still there's a unanimous agreement about explosion ,then it must be true
IMO E

Author:  LeopardLiu [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:46 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Answer is E
(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster. Undermines the conclusion

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion. Out of scope

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source. Irrelevant

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities. Undermines the conclusion

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years. Correct. If people at different areas without connections stated the same even, this event might well be true.

Author:  debjit1990 [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:47 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Ans:E
(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster...irrelevant

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion...not concerned what some small number stories are telling

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source...irrelevant

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.out of scope

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years....as there is no contact for 5 thousand years it is unlikely that they are saying this for societal benefit.correct

Author:  Vatsal7794 [ 12 Jul 2022, 07:51 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.
Just because scientists have not found any evidence for volcanic eruption or asteroid impact, it does not mean explosion was not there
The word explosion can refer to many things
That's what asnwer A says

So the correct answer is A

Author:  sunitapandey [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:02 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

IMO E:

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.-- This weakens the argument. As it implies the events were not explosions

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.- it doesnot matter. We need to know whether the events were explosions or not, what followed those explosion is irrelevant.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.-- Again not relevant.Does not impact the the argument.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.-- Not strengthening my argument.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.- Correct - If the people from different culture in Alondia did not contact each other. They all cannot come up with the same narrative of calling such events explosion.Unless the event indeed was an explosion. As stated in the passage.

Author:  AnirudhaS [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:17 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.
Word can mean anything, does not directly stengthens or weakens.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.
key word here is 'small no. of stories'. The passage already says the accounts vary with timing, extent, etc. So it is additional information but of no use to us.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.
The islands may or maynot be within a few hundred miles. Since this is not specified, this statement does not strengthen the argument.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.
The natural events still happened, but nothing much is said about whatt natural event occured. this is irrelevant to the argument.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.
This takes away an alternate cause. There is a possibility this myth might have been passed on from generations to generations. But that is not the case as the islands largely had no contact between themselves. This strengthens the argument.

Author:  Danielyammine [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:20 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

The answer is E
Choice A is very trick, But it does not support why all the culture report same thing
Choice B also does not support why all the culture report same thing
Choice C and D weaken the argument
Choice E support the fact that event if those people never met before they're still reporting the same story

Posted from my mobile device

Author:  Archit3110 [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:27 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster. does not strengthen the conclusion

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion. does not strengthen the conclusion

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source. irrelevant

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities. correct choice

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years. irrelevant

OPTION D is correct


Bunuel wrote:
The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.


 


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Author:  vishujn2 [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:46 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

If we say that all these culture were separated from each other than there should be a explosion in this area for that explosion to be seen in the histories of thopse cultures. in Option E we say that these culture are separated from each other.

Author:  NextGenNerd [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:55 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Strengthening question:

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.
-Wrong. Does not strengthen the conclusion

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.
-Wrong. Does not strengthen the conclusion

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.
-Wrong. Does not strengthen the conclusion

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.
-Wrong. Does not strengthen the conclusion

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.
-Correct. If none of them have met for 5000 years and yet all of them have the same/similar stories, the probability that the event actually happened is so much higher. Hence this is a strengther

Author:  Harsha009 [ 12 Jul 2022, 08:59 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

E is the correct answers since it supports the argument that different small islands all had a story referring to an explosion and if they didn't have contact among each other, then it must be that the explosion had occured, all of them cannot be having the same story without any contact among them

Author:  Iotaa [ 12 Jul 2022, 09:35 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

The question is which option most strongly supports the argument that the stories recount an actual explosion.

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster: But the equation is about the actual explosion. Irrelevant. Eliminate

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion: Out of context. Eliminate

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source: Out of context. Eliminate

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities: Too general. Also, it may or may not hold true in this particular scenario. Eliminate

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years: If the people didn't had any contact with each other, how did they communicate a same fake story? One of the possible reasons might be people have known these from their ancestors who might directly visualise the explosion or something similar which confirms the story. It supports the argument

Hence E is the answer.

Author:  Kinshook [ 12 Jul 2022, 09:40 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Premise: The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago.
Counter-Premise: These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts.
Premise: However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need.
Conclusion: Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.
The statement does not support the conclusion of the argument that it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion since it mentions that in the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.
Incorrect

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.
The statement provides support to the conclusion that it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion since it mentions that a small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion. The explosion mentioned must be real since it is also followed by a large wave.
Correct

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.
The statement does not provide any support to the conclusion that it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion. What is the relation between many stories about explosion and range of explosion being audible.
Incorrect

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.
The statement does not support the conclusion of the argument that it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion since it mentions that ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.
Incorrect

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.
This statement does not affect the conclusion that it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion . How does it matter whether most of the people of Alondia had contact with one another or not.
Incorrect

IMO B

Author:  sanjayparihar16 [ 12 Jul 2022, 09:57 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

The histories of many cultures in Alondia, a region comprising hundreds of small, remote islands spread over a very large geographic area, make reference to a great explosion that is said to have taken place several thousand years ago. These accounts vary somewhat as to the cause, extent, and timing of the explosion, and geologists studying the region have been unable to find evidence of a volcanic eruption or asteroid impact large enough to serve as the basis of the accounts. However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need. Indeed, since the element that all of these stories have in common is the explosion itself, it is much more likely that the stories recount an actual explosion.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument above?

What if the different group of people who have never interacted before narrate the similar version of the incident? Then this would strengthen our believe that there must have been some event that is being discussed among people

Option E states this fact only.


(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster. —-> We are trying to prove that the incident really happened. The meaning of the word is irrelevant.

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion. —-> But then the similar line of reasoning can be given to discard the claims about waves as well.

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source. —-> So what? How does it prove that the incident really took place? This can be true but doesn’t help in strengthening of our argument.

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities. —-> This talks about a very generic trend. A trap choice that we can actually relate with but our focus is on proving the fact that the incident really took place.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years. —-> Correct choice for the above mentioned reasons.

Author:  gmatophobia [ 12 Jul 2022, 10:52 ]
Post subject:  Re: GMAT Club World Cup 2022 (DAY 2): The histories of many cultures in

Conclusion of the argument : However, these facts do not justify the claim advanced by some scholars that such stories are entirely symbolic, created by these cultures to serve some societal need

We have to support the argument

(A) In the languages of some of the cultures of Alondia, the word for “explosion” can refer to any kind of disaster.

While this is a strong contender, this option does not provide much value to strengthen the argument. We already know that the histories of many cultures in Alondia make reference to a great explosion. Now whether that's in context of disaster to something else, doesn't really matter

(B) A small number of the stories also include an account of a large wave that followed the explosion.

IMO this is not a great strengthener, first we do not know how many stories and their reliability. Hence will eliminate

(C) Most volcanic eruptions are only audible to humans within a few hundred miles of the source.

The audibility of the eruptions do not add any value to the argument, hence not relevant

(D) Because ancient cultures often associated natural events with specific deities, many stories in these cultures cite such events as a way of indirectly referencing those deities.

We are already told that the stories are not entirely symbolic. Hence this option weakens the conclusion. We can eliminate this as well.

(E) Until relatively recently, most of the people of Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years.

I would go with this option. As the people Alondia had had no contact with one another, either direct or indirect, for at least five thousand years it indicates that the stories are independent and not influenced across cultures. This gives us more reason to believe in the author's conclusion

IMO E

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