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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 21 Sep 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  Carnegie Mellon University Tepper Essay Analysis, 2020–2021

FROM mbaMission Blog: Carnegie Mellon University Tepper Essay Analysis, 2020–2021
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Last year, Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business required just one essay from its applicants, who could use up to 500 words to explain what they would bring to the Tepper community that would allow them to make an impact on it. The school is posing the same question this season, but now the query is for a 150-word “short answer essay,” and the admissions committee has introduced a completely new prompt for its required essay. Applicants must now discuss overcoming adversity of some kind in their life and what the experience taught them about themselves. The topic seems fitting for this year’s turbulent times. Candidates who feel they need additional opportunity to convey an important aspect of their candidacy to the admissions committee can take advantage of the optional essay, which is sufficiently broad to accommodate topics other than just problem areas in one’s profile (if executed effectively). Read on for our full analysis of Tepper’s essay prompts for 2020–2021.

Required Essay: The Tepper community is dynamic and unique. Each community member’s individual journey has shaped them into classmates who are collaborative and supportive. Describe how you have overcome adversity during your journey. What did you learn about yourself and how has that shaped who you are? (Maximum 350-500 words.)

As a quote typically attributed to Albert Einstein says, “Adversity introduces a man to himself.” Facing adversity is often revelatory and can show you what you are capable of, which values are most important to you, and how far you are willing to go or how hard you are willing to work to overcome whatever stands in your way. That Tepper would pose such a question this year seems only natural, given the level of hardship so many people are (and have been) dealing with, and candidates’ responses will undoubtedly be very informative for the admissions committee.

First, take care not to conflate adversity with a setback or failure. To fit the school’s query, the situation you describe in your essay needs to relate to a state of opposing, unfavorable, or even hostile conditions rather than a finite or easily quantifiable impediment. And adversity can take many forms: societal, financial, mental/emotional, physical, etc. The source can be external (e.g., a persistent lack of money, others’ prejudices, physical limitations) or internal (e.g., phobia, mental illness, language abilities). It can be quietly oppressive or overtly so. We doubt that you have faced adversity only once in your life—though we are happy for you if this is somehow the case—so be sure to consider all your options thoroughly to identify the one that was most affecting and influential.

With this essay, the admissions committee wants to learn about how you interpret, process, and react to and in such situations. To craft an effective response, you will obviously need to clearly convey what form the adversity took and what it prevented you from doing and how. What effect did it have on you, in terms of both what you could do and how you felt? What were your thought processes and actions in response? Describe how the situation was resolved or has improved for you (the essay prompt implies a resolution in asking “how you have overcome adversity,” emphasis ours) and what you realized about yourself as a result. Note that Tepper specifically asks not what you learned in a general sense but what you learned about yourself. Lastly, share how that knowledge has subsequently influenced the person you are today and how you interact with the world around you. Showing a clear cause-and-effect relationship between the individual you were (or believed yourself to be) before the situation and the individual you are now will help the admissions reader understand how and why it was a major factor in your personal development.

Short Answer Essay: At the Tepper School, we value our community and it is important for each person to contribute to its success. What difference will you make as a member of the MBA class at the Tepper School? (Maximum 150 words.)

To know how you would be able to contribute at Tepper, you must first understand the community and environment you will be contributing to, so—if you have not already done so—you must research the school in depth before attempting to craft this essay. This means moving beyond the program’s website, viewbook, and related marketing materials and making direct contact with students, alumni, and even school representatives. And although visiting the campus and sitting in on a class is not an option at the moment, you might still be able to attend an admissions event in your area (safely!). Other options include reading student blogs and recent press releases from the school, as well as checking out the Tepper YouTube channel. This kind of firsthand observation of what and who the Tepper program truly entails, paired with a profound knowledge of how it works, is key in identifying what is unique about you viewed against this backdrop—and will help you highlight what you can bring to the mix and how.

Pay special attention to the aspects of and areas at Tepper that speak to you personally in some way, and consider social events/clubs and professional development opportunities along with course work and academic offerings. Business school is meant to be a comprehensive environment and experience that enriches students in ways not just related directly to business, and perhaps your best potential for contribution lies in one of these areas. If you are an avid quant wizard, you could of course help your fellow students with class work and projects. If you have a depth of knowledge or years of experience in a particular area, whether through your job or in a personal capacity (such as being a dedicated wine aficionado), you could serve as a kind of subject matter expert for those around you in the program or even a valuable component in someone’s recruiting network. If you are particularly funny, creative, or athletic, you may be the ideal fit to lead an extracurricular group or play a significant role in a nonacademic project or event.

The broad scope of this mini essay prompt allows you a great amount of freedom to choose and share the information you believe is most important for the admissions committee to know about you. Truly focus on just one or two elements of your personality that are most relevant to the context here: the Tepper experience. Avoid trying to squeeze in as much information as possible about yourself in hopes of stumbling on the “right” answers. Instead, clearly present and illustrate your most fitting qualities and show a direct connection between them and specific aspects of the MBA program. Authenticity and enthusiasm are the keys to your success with this essay.

Because a contribution essay such as this has similarities to a “why our school?” essay, and because “why our school?” is often an element of a classic personal statement, we encourage you to download a free copy of our Personal Statement Guide, which offers further guidance on preparing for and writing such a submission and includes multiple illustrative examples.

Optional Essay: Use this essay to convey important information that you may not have otherwise been able to convey. This may include unexplained resume gaps, context for recommender selection, etc. If you are a re-applicant, explain how your candidacy has strengthened since your last application.

Tepper’s optional essay prompt is somewhat broad in the sense that it does not demand that you discuss only problem areas in your candidacy. That said, the second line of the prompt does seem to imply that the admissions committee expects the essay to be used in this way. If an element of your profile would benefit from further explanation—such as a poor grade or overall GPA, a low GMAT or GRE score, or a legal or disciplinary issue—this is your opportunity to address it and answer any related questions an admissions officer might have. We caution you against simply trying to fill this space because you fear that not doing so would somehow count against you, and do not interpret this as a blank-slate invitation to dump every bit of remaining information about yourself that you feel the school is lacking or to offer a few anecdotes you were unable to use in your required essay. Although no word limit is stipulated, be mindful that by submitting a second essay, you are making a claim on an (undoubtedly very busy) admissions representative’s time, so you be sure that what you have written is worth the additional resources and effort. For more guidance, download  our free mbaMission Optional Essays Guide, in which we offer detailed advice (along with multiple examples) on when and how to take advantage of the optional essay.

If you are a reapplicant, this essay is pretty straightforward. Whether you have improved your academic record, received a promotion, begun a new and exciting project, increased your community involvement, or taken on some sort of personal challenge, the key to success with this essay is conveying a very deliberate path of achievement. Tepper wants to know that you have been actively striving to improve yourself and your profile, and that you have seized opportunities during the previous year to do so, because a Tepper MBA is vital to you. The responses to this essay question will vary greatly from one candidate to the next, because each person’s needs and experiences differ. We are more than happy to provide one-on-one assistance with this highly personal essay to ensure that your efforts over the past year are presented in the best light possible.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 22 Sep 2020, 12:00 ]
Post subject:  Professor Profiles: Eric Sussman, UCLA Anderson

FROM mbaMission Blog: Professor Profiles: Eric Sussman, UCLA Anderson
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Many MBA applicants feel that they are purchasing a brand when they choose a business school. However, the educational experience you will have is what is crucial to your future, and no one will affect your education more than your professors. Today, we focus on Eric Sussman from UCLA Anderson.

Eric Sussman is an adjunct professor in Anderson’s accounting department and also serves as president of Amber Capital, a real estate investment company. He has been voted Teacher of the Year 13 times by Anderson students and received the Citibank Teaching Award in 1998 and the Neidorf Decade Teaching Award in 2008—both honors decided by a faculty committee. In addition, in 2009, Sussman won the Teaching Excellence Award in the full-time MBA program, which is decided by a vote of second-year students. In 2015, he received the University-Wide Distinguished Teacher Award. Sussman has also been recognized by Bloomberg Businessweek as one of Anderson’s Outstanding Faculty members each year since 1996, and in 2011, the publication named Sussman one of the Top Ten Most Popular Business School Professors.

In addition to his work in the classroom, Sussman created Insight FSA, a software tool that measures and evaluates the financial accounting and corporate reporting risk for public companies via Edgar Online. A second-year student blogger at Anderson once described Sussman in a post as “one of what I call the five rock-star professors here,” and a first year we interviewed stated that Sussman “has an outstanding reputation at the school.” An alumnus we spoke with who had taken Sussman’s “Corporate Financial Reporting” class agreed: “[Sussman is] probably the best professor at Anderson in my eyes and to a lot of other students,” the alumnus said, continuing, “Professor Sussman is also incredibly flexible when it comes to helping students. If you need the help, he will find a way to make time for you no matter your level. He truly was a passionate practitioner who invested so much in the students and school. People like him make Anderson exceptional.”

For more information about UCLA Anderson and 16 other top-ranked business schools, check out our free mbaMission Insider’s Guides.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 24 Sep 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  Acclimating to the Cold at Tuck and Hitting the Slopes at Kellogg

FROM mbaMission Blog: Acclimating to the Cold at Tuck and Hitting the Slopes at Kellogg
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The thought of spending the winters in Hanover, New Hampshire—home to Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business—may send shivers down your spine. But those who hang tough and embrace the cold can discover some rewarding winter experiences, such as ice hockey and downhill skiing. Both beginners and seasoned veterans participate each year in ice hockey games organized by Tuck hockey leagues. Never played? Not to worry—teams are organized by skill level, so you can find a team of hockey players who will not care if you trip over the blueline (that is ice hockey lingo—you will learn). And those who are not quite ready to play hockey can always get in the game by cheering on their classmates!

Meanwhile, the Skiing and Boarding Club takes advantage of the Dartmouth Skiway in Lyme, New Hampshire, and organizes trips beyond campus as well. The club’s major event is the weekend-long Tuck Winter Carnival, which draws more than 650 people from approximately 15 business schools. In 2020, multiple student teams participated in such events as downhill ski races, a 1980s fashion show, and a DJ dance party. All events at the Winter Carnival combine socializing with raising money for a selected nonprofit organization. At Tuck, you just might be too busy working up a sweat to fret about the cold.

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Evanston, Illinois—home to Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management—might not immediately come to mind as a popular destination for skiers. But although Kellogg students may not go skiing in Evanston proper, nearly 1,000 first and second years and their significant others participate in the school’s annual ski trip, which, according to students we interviewed, “remains the biggest of its kind. Like everything else at Kellogg, the trip is student run … from logistics to marketing to sponsorship. … First- and second-year students work together to make it an unforgettable weeklong adventure.” Participating students have traveled to such locations as Steamboat Resort and Telluride, in Colorado, where they stayed in mountainside condos. Those who wish to ski can avail themselves of three-, four-, or even five-day passes, while nonskiers can enjoy such activities as cooking classes, snowshoe lessons, and spa treatments (at reduced prices). The evenings feature theme parties, such as an annual 1980s party. The 2019 event took place in December in Whistler, Canada.

In a January 2018 Poets&Quants article, a second year described his experience on a past Kellogg ski trip: “While we spent our days bungee jumping, dog-sledding, and snowboarding, we also deepened our relationships with other members of the Kellogg community.” A first year with whom we spoke expressed how impressed she was with Kellogg’s ski club for “planning the best week of business school for [close to 1,000] people!” She added that the ski trip is simply not to be missed: “It’s all of your closest friends, taking over a ski town for one full week with amazing parties and social activities—many of which are sponsored!”

For a thorough exploration of what Dartmouth Tuck, Northwestern Kellogg, and 15 other top business schools have to offer, check out our free mbaMission Insider’s Guides.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 25 Sep 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  Set the Tone Early, and Employ Active Verbs in Your MBA Application Es

FROM mbaMission Blog: Set the Tone Early, and Employ Active Verbs in Your MBA Application Essays
Any good journalist will tell you that the key to writing a good news story or opinion piece is to grab the reader’s attention with the very first line. Many book authors employ this same tactic. Although only a small percentage of people have actually read Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, most know that the novel begins with three famous words: “Call me Ishmael.” A powerful first line can stick with readers long after they have finished reading (and sometimes when they have not even read it!). For example, we all likely recognize the statement “It was a dark and stormy night,” but few may know that it is the opening line of a book by an obscure writer (Paul Clifford by Edward George Bulwer-Lytton).

Although beginning an essay with a very short introduction is the norm, sometimes a punchy opening line can capture a reader’s attention in a useful way. Consider the differences between the following pairs of openers. Which line in each example better captures your attention?

Example 1: A “Why MBA?” essay

A: “After I graduate with my MBA, I want to work in the wine industry.”

B: “Blood runs in the veins of all humans, but wine also runs in mine.”

Example 2: A “What are you most passionate about in life?” essay

A: “I enjoy nothing more than playing ice hockey.”

B: “As soon as the nearby river freezes, I wake at 6 a.m. each day and join my teammates for a prework hockey scrimmage.”

No set formula exists for opening lines—the possibilities are endless, and each opener depends on the context of the story being told. Nonetheless, our point is that you must carefully consider your opening line, because it will set the tone for your essay and determine whether your reader will want to read more.

Now let us examine the role of active verbs in your essays. Anyone who has ever written an email that has been misunderstood—let alone an MBA application essay—is no doubt aware of the subtleties of language and the nuances that can change a message’s meaning. Indeed, you can enliven a basic sentence simply by choosing more active verbs.

For example, consider the verb “earn.” By using “earn” rather than a more passive verb in the following examples, we can alter the meaning and impact of each sentence. Suddenly, you are in control. Suddenly, you worked hard and, as a result, accomplished great things.

Passive/poor example: “I was promoted from junior to senior analyst.”

Active/good example: “I earned a promotion from junior to senior analyst.”

Passive/poor example: “After being awarded my MBA, I will be able to…”

Active/good example: “After earning my MBA, I will be able to…”

Once you have finished your application essays, review them to see how often you can replace certain words with “earn” or a similar verb—such as “achieve,” “gain,” and “attain”—that denotes action on your part.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 26 Sep 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  The George Washington University School of Business Essay Analysis, 20

FROM mbaMission Blog: The George Washington University School of Business Essay Analysis, 2020–2021
[url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/The-George-Washington-University-School-of-Business-GWSB.png][img]https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/The-George-Washington-University-School-of-Business-GWSB-300x200.png[/img][/url]
The George Washington University School of Business (GWSB) demands just a single 500-word essay from its applicants, one that covers several of the key elements of a traditional personal statement. In fact, on its website, the school refers to the submission as a “Statement of Purpose.” To craft an effective response, candidates will need to spend time really getting to know the program in depth. Reapplicants are asked to explain how their profile has changed (and ideally strengthened) since they last applied—also a pretty standard and straightforward request. Our full analysis of both prompts follows.

[b]Admissions Essay (MBA Program specific)[/b]

[b]In no more than 500 words, tell us why studying at the GW School of Business (GWSB) is the program best suited for you and your academic interests, and explain how you will leverage both your past professional career and future academic experience at GW to achieve your post-MBA aspirations.[/b]

With this rather plainspoken and traditional essay prompt, the admissions committee is requesting fundamental information that will help it understand your motivation for pursuing an MBA, and specifically one from the GWSB. By not explicitly requesting that you present well-defined short- and long-term goals, the school leaves the decision of how to frame your motivation(s) up to you. Nevertheless, one or both goals will likely play a part in your essay response. After all, explaining why you feel you need an MBA without referencing what you expect to do with it after you graduate would probably be pretty difficult. The school is naturally assuming that if you have reached a point in your professional journey where you believe an MBA is necessary to move forward, you must have an understanding of why the degree is a critical part of continuing on that journey. This is simply your chance to outline your reasoning and needs for the admissions committee so it can be confident you have given this important step an appropriate amount of thought and are committed to your decision.

To illustrate how the GWSB can help you, you must demonstrate a thorough understanding of what the program offers and a well-thought-out game plan for engaging with these offerings. Effectively doing this and subsequently writing a reasoned, nuanced essay requires that you familiarize yourself with the school’s various resources and pinpoint those that truly pertain to you and the direction in which you hope to head. Go the extra mile in learning about the program. This is where we would normally encourage you to visit campus and sit in on a class, and/or at least attend an admissions event in your area, but the ongoing pandemic precludes such options at this time. Instead, connect directly with students and alumni (online or via phone, Skype, Zoom, etc.), read student blogs and the program’s recent press releases, and peruse the [b][url=https://www.youtube.com/c/TheGeorgeWashingtonUniversitySchoolofBusiness]GWSB’s YouTube channel[/url][/b]. This will provide the kind of in-depth insight that will show the admissions committee you are serious about the school and are confident you belong there. Simply presenting a list of classes and clubs you think sound interesting will not suffice, and absolutely avoid vague, pandering statements about how great the school is. You must reveal clear connections between what you need to learn or experience (with respect to skills, network, experiences, exposure, and/or knowledge base) to be able to reach your aspirations and the specific resources and opportunities at the school that you believe will allow you to do so. Your goal is to convince the admissions committee that the GWSB is the missing link between who and where you are now and who and where you envision yourself in the future. An effective response will provide evidence that you (1) have done your research as to what is required to attain your goals, (2) understand where you are on that trajectory (what skills and experience you already possess that are key to success in your envisioned future), and (3) why/how attaining an MBA from the GWSB will move you further in the right direction.

Although this prompt does not encompass all the elements of a standard personal essay, it does involve certain ones, so we encourage you to download a free copy of the [b][url=https://shop.mbamission.com/products/personal-statement-guide]mbaMission Personal Statement Guide[/url][/b], which could be helpful in crafting your response. This complimentary guide offers detailed advice on approaching and framing these topics, along with multiple illustrative examples.

[b]Re-Applicant Essay: Please describe any actions you have taken to strengthen your candidacy since your last application. Focus on any steps you have taken toward professional and personal growth. (500 words maximum)[/b]

Thankfully, this essay is pretty clear-cut. Whether you have improved your academic record, received a promotion, begun a new and exciting project, increased your community involvement, or taken on some sort of personal challenge, the key to success with this essay is conveying a very deliberate path of achievement. The GWSB wants to know that you have been actively striving to improve yourself and your profile, and that you have seized opportunities during the previous year to do so, because an MBA from the school is vital to you. The responses to this essay question will vary greatly from one candidate to the next, because each person’s needs and experiences differ. We are more than happy to provide one-on-one assistance with this highly personal essay to ensure that your efforts over the past year are presented in the best light possible.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 27 Sep 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: My Recommender’s Grammar Will Ruin My

FROM mbaMission Blog: MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: My Recommender’s Grammar Will Ruin My Chances
At mbaMission, we emphasize the need for effective written communication. Indeed, gaining admission to your target business school involves no real “trick”—earning that coveted letter of acceptance depends on your ability to tell your story in a compelling way and in your own words. But is good grammar vital to good communication? And if so, will your recommender’s bad grammar be detrimental to your chances?

We can assure you that no MBA admissions committee will reject a candidate’s application because they incorrectly used a semicolon instead of a comma. The committee is seeking to learn about you as an individual to evaluate you and your potential, both as a student at the school and in the business world after graduation. What is most important in your application is that you convey your unique stories—and ideally captivate your reader—in your own voice. Of course, you should always strive to perfect your presentation, but in the end, the quality and authenticity of your content carry more weight than your verbiage and punctuation. And if you are not a native English speaker, you can certainly be forgiven for the occasional idiosyncrasy in your expression.

This is even truer for your recommenders. The committee is not evaluating these individuals for a spot in the school’s program, so their grammar is largely irrelevant to your candidacy. And again, if your recommender is not a native English speaker, the admissions committees can be even more forgiving. The school will not penalize you for having a recommender who grew up in another country or whose English skills are not very polished for any other reason. As long as your recommender can offer anecdotes about your performance that create a strong impression about you and complement the abilities and qualities you have presented elsewhere in your application, you should be just fine. The substance of the recommendation is always what matters most.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 29 Sep 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  All About Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT (Part 1)

FROM mbaMission Blog: All About Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT (Part 1)
With regard to the GMAT, raw intellectual horsepower helps, but it is not everything. Manhattan Prep’s Stacey Koprince teaches you how to perform at your best on test day by using some common sense.

Which type of Critical Reasoning (CR) question drives you crazy? Boldface? Find the Assumption? Inference?

The Critical Reasoning Process

Before you dive into individual question types, knowing the overall CR process is critical. Here are a few key notes:

  • There are four major* and five minor question subtypes, and each one has its own particular technique details. We will talk about the four major types in this post; check back soon for more information on the five minor types.
  • Your job is to learn the overall process/strategy for CR as well as the techniques specific to each question subtype.
*Note: Major types show up more frequently than minor types.

To master CR, you should be able to answer the following questions about each question type:

  • How do I recognize this question type?
  • What kind of information should I expect to find in the argument, based on this question type? What kind of information is going to be the most important?
  • What is the goal for this question type? What characteristics must the correct answer have?
  • What kinds of traps will be set for me? What are the common wrong answer types for this question type?
The Assumption Family

Assumption Family questions always involve a conclusion. This group consists of five subtypes overall. Here are the three major ones in this category:

Find the Assumption: What does the other assume is true when drawing the conclusion? Want to try another?

Strengthen the Conclusion: What new information would help to make the conclusion a little more likely to be true?

Weaken the Conclusion: What new information would help to make the conclusion a little less likely to be true?

The Evidence Family

Evidence Family questions really do not have conclusions (never “big” conclusions, like the Assumption arguments, and usually no conclusions at all).

This group consists of two subtypes overall, but only Inference questions are a major type:

Inference: Given the information in the argument, which answer choice must be true?

Spend some time mastering those four major types, as well as the overall CR process.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 30 Sep 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  HBS Interview Invitations Will Go Out on October 6: How to Prepare

FROM mbaMission Blog: HBS Interview Invitations Will Go Out on October 6: How to Prepare
[url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/harvardbusschool91414.jpg][img]https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/harvardbusschool91414-300x180.jpg[/img][/url]
In a [b][url=https://www.hbs.edu/mba/admissions/Pages/from-the-admissions-director.aspx?post=round-1-interview-invitations]September 29 blog post[/url][/b], Harvard Business School (HBS) announced that Round 1 interview invitations will go out on Tuesday, October 6, 2020, at noon eastern time. HBS will send only one batch of interview invites, along with notifications of “further consideration” (to-be-determined Round 2 applicant pool) and “early release.” This year, all interviews will be conducted virtually.

HBS’s managing director of MBA admissions and financial aid, Chad Losee, addressed the impending invitations in the blog post:

To everyone who has applied—we have been inspired by your stories as we read your applications. Thank you for your interest in HBS. And good luck with just one last week of waiting.

Now is the time to get ready for this crucial step in your application process. Check out these important resources created by mbaMission specifically for HBS interview candidates:

[b]INTENSIVE SIMULATION[/b]

[b][url=https://www.mbamission.com/about/?display=team&name=devi-vallabhaneni]Devi Vallabhaneni[/url][/b], a veteran admissions interviewer with years of experience interviewing hundreds of HBS candidates and mbaMission’s HBS Interviewer in Residence, is offering sessions online via webcam to help applicants prepare for the real thing. The live interview simulation includes the following components:

[list]
[*][b]Two or more 30-minute interview experiences customized to your application:[/b] Before your first session, Devi will spend several hours reviewing your written application, following the same process she used when conducting candidate interviews for HBS. This allows her to target her questions based on what she discovers about you from your application.[/*]
[*][b]Personalized feedback:[/b] After each interview session, Devi will provide you with targeted feedback, talking you through her impressions and offering strategic advice for improving your HBS interview skills.[/*]
[*][b]A reflection period:[/b] You will have time between your interview sessions with Devi to internalize the feedback and adjust accordingly before trying again.[/*]
[/list]
For more information and to secure your spot, please visit our [b][url=https://shop.mbamission.com/collections/services/products/hbs-in-person-intensive-interview-simulation]HBS Intensive Interview Simulation page[/url][/b].

[b]MOCK INTERVIEW AND POST-INTERVIEW REFLECTION SUPPORT[/b]

Another resource to help you prepare is our [b][url=https://shop.mbamission.com/collections/services/products/hbs-mock-interview-and-post-interview-reflection-support]HBS Mock Interview and Post-Interview Reflection Support[/url][/b] service. Through it, you work with an experienced mbaMission Senior Consultant or Managing Director who will have read your entire HBS application and prepared customized questions based on your candidacy. Via Q&A, feedback, and thorough response planning, we will help you improve the content of your answers, your time management skills, and your overall presentation.

HBS asks all interviewed applicants to write a post-interview essay and submit it within 24 hours of their interview. This essay has no word limit, and HBS suggests that candidates think of it as an email they would write to a friend or colleague, rather than as a formal essay.

As part of our targeted HBS interview package, an mbaMission advisor will help you strategize your approach to this special essay. Your consultant will also review a draft of the essay and provide feedback intended to assist you in making it stronger and more effective. Please note that because the HBS Admissions Office explicitly states that applicants are not to write anything in advance or receive outside help with this essay, your mbaMission consultant will not edit your writing but will instead offer detailed strategic direction via comments only.

To purchase your HBS mock interview preparation session, [b][url=https://shop.mbamission.com/collections/services/products/hbs-mock-interview-and-post-interview-reflection-support]click here[/url][/b]!

[b]HBS INTERVIEW GUIDE[/b]

Download your complimentary copy of mbaMission’s [b][url=https://shop.mbamission.com/products/harvard-business-school-interview-guide]Harvard Business School Interview Guide[/url][/b] today.

In creating our interview guides, we have drawn on countless communications with MBA students, alumni, admissions officers, and applicants, in addition to our vast library of interview reports submitted by current and past clients. Our HBS Interview Guide provides the following information:

[list]
[*]Insight into what the school is evaluating and hoping to gain from the interview[/*]
[*]An explanation of the school’s approach to interviewing (e.g., self-scheduled or invite only, blind versus comprehensive)[/*]
[*]Past applicants’ firsthand accounts of their interview experiences and multiple sample interview question sequences[/*]
[*]Tips on preparing for and responding to questions that most often vex applicants[/*]
[*]Help in formulating compelling questions of your own[/*]
[/list]
[b]FREE INTERVIEW WORKSHOP[/b] [b]

[/b]

Find out exactly what you need to do in order to prepare for your interview during our free [b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/details/26233/]“MBA Interview Workshop” webinar on October 14, 2020[/url][/b]. Led by mbaMission Senior Consultant Krista Nannery, topics for the webinar will include the following:

[list]
[*]Best practices to help you prepare for and succeed in your business school interviews[/*]
[*]The different types of interviews you may encounter[/*]
[*]What admissions committees are looking for[/*]
[*]Tips for time management[/*]
[/list]
[b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/details/26233/]Enroll for free today[/url][/b]!

Good luck to all Round 1 applicants! If you believe you can benefit from one of our interview planning services—or would simply like more information on the process—feel free to [b][url=https://www.mbamission.com/about/?display=contact]contact us[/url][/b] anytime!
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 01 Oct 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  Five Strategies for Increasing Your Visibility on LinkedIn 

FROM mbaMission Blog: Five Strategies for Increasing Your Visibility on LinkedIn 
[url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Five-Strategies-for-Increasing-Your-Visibility-on-LinkedIn-.jpg][img]https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Five-Strategies-for-Increasing-Your-Visibility-on-LinkedIn--300x200.jpg[/img][/url]
This post was written by our resident Career Coach, [url=https://www.mbamission.com/who-we-are/team/elissa-harris/]Elissa Harris[/url]. To sign up for a free 30-minute career consultation with Elissa, please [url=https://www.mbamission.com/consult/career-coaching/]click here[/url].

Optimizing your LinkedIn presence requires more than just creating a compelling profile. It involves engaging with your network, building relationships, and gaining visibility among your target audience. An effective strategy for achieving these goals is to post, share, and comment on content within the LinkedIn platform.

Below are five suggestions for attracting attention to your LinkedIn profile:

[list]
[*][b]Be strategic.[/b] Your content should reinforce your brand and areas of expertise/interest. Think about why people would follow you. What is your edge? What do you want to be known for? Use this as a guide for the type of content you post or share.  [/*]
[*][b]Post frequently[/b]—at least once a week but not more than once per day. You can comment on content, share existing content, or create your own content. [/*]
[*][b]Reach your target audience.[/b] Use relevant hashtags in your posts but not more than three in any one post. Tag others in your industry (not more than three people), especially those who are likely to share your content and comment on your post. Make sure your profile has a picture and that you have at least 200 connections. [/*]
[*][b]Encourage interaction to signal the relevance of your posts.[/b] Get early engagement with at least five comments on your post within the first 60 minutes (or sooner). Post when your network is available to respond. Respond or react to each comment that is made on your post. Interact with other posts within 60 minutes of posting your own content.[/*]
[*][b]Drive engagement with your posts.[/b] Use images as they are twice as likely to get comments as a text-only post. Videos are also a great tool for visibility! Ask questions of your audience, and encourage them to share their opinions. Limit links to content that originated outside of the LinkedIn platform; perhaps add the link as the first comment to the post.[/*]
[/list]
In addition to posting content to gain visibility on LinkedIn, you can do the following: 

[list]
[*][b]Customize your LinkedIn URL.[/b] Click on “Edit public profile & URL” on your Profile page. Remove unnecessary numbers and letters at the end of the URL. Use this clean URL on your resume and in your email signature. [/*]
[*][b]Keep your profile up to date.[/b] Review it every six months to ensure it reflects your current personal brand. Adapt your positioning in the “About” section. Add new job responsibilities, volunteer activities, and skill development courses. Seek new companies and key influencers to follow.[/*]
[*][b]Join industry- and skill-based LinkedIn Groups[/b] to learn about the space from professionals and to exchange ideas. Recruiters often belong to these groups and will engage with active members who have the right combination of interest and knowledge. [/*]
[*][b]Use relevant keywords in your headline and “About” section.[/b] Recruiters search LinkedIn for ideal candidates using keywords listed in the job description (especially in the responsibilities section). [/*]
[/list]
Finally, we also recommend reading [url=https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/linkedin-news/][b]LinkedIn News[/b][/url] for insights on business, career, and economic news. For example, a recent post (“[b][url=https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/linkedin-top-startups-2020-50-us-companies-rise-jessi-hempel/?trackingId=kBg3UpYkSXKOMVeBmVYD2g%3D%3D]LinkedIn Top Startups 2020: The 50 U.S. companies on the rise[/url][/b]”) highlighted hot start-ups and shared a listing that can be used to identify target companies for a job search or to understand key trends in investments and customer behavior.  

To learn more about mbaMission’s perspective on LinkedIn, read our previous blog posts “[b][url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/2019/03/26/are-you-maximizing-the-benefits-of-linkedin/]Are You Maximizing the Benefits of LinkedIn?[/url][/b]” and “[b][url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/2016/10/05/mba-career-news-six-tips-for-maximizing-your-linkedin-profile/]Six Tips for Maximizing Your LinkedIn Profile[/url][/b][b].[/b]”
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 02 Oct 2020, 09:00 ]
Post subject:  Professor Profiles: Lourdes S. Casanova, Cornell Johnson

FROM mbaMission Blog: Professor Profiles: Lourdes S. Casanova, Cornell Johnson
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Many MBA applicants feel that they are purchasing a brand when they choose a business school. However, the educational experience you will have is what is crucial to your future, and no one will affect your education more than your professors. Today, we focus on Lourdes S. Casanova from the Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University.

Now a senior lecturer at Cornell Johnson, Lourdes S. Casanova joined the school in 2012 after a lengthy international career. Casanova taught at INSEAD in France for nearly 25 years and served as a visiting professor at such schools as ESADE, the University of Oxford, and the University of Zurich. At Johnson, she is also the director of the school’s Emerging Markets Institute.

Casanova teaches such courses as “Leaders in Emerging Markets,” which brings executives from companies in emerging markets to speak on campus, and “Experience in International Management,” which combines classroom sessions with international trips where students meet with local companies, government officials, and other aspiring MBAs. She has been chosen as one of the most influential Ibero-American women by Esglobal three times, most recently in 2017.

For more information about Cornell Johnson and 16 other top-ranked business schools, check out our free mbaMission Insider’s Guides.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 03 Oct 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  MBAs for Professionals at Villanova School of Business and Krannert Sc

FROM mbaMission Blog: MBAs for Professionals at Villanova School of Business and Krannert School of Management
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Villanova School of Business (VSB)

In 2013, the Villanova School of Business (VSB) received a $50M gift from alumnus James C. Davis, founder of recruitment company Allegis Group, and his wife, Kim. The donation—part of a $600M capital campaign—was the largest in the school’s history and was reportedly “earmarked to improve academic and career advising, increase internship and study abroad opportunities, perform technology upgrades, and provide scholarships,” according to Bloomberg Businessweek. VSB also planned to use a portion of the funds to “beef up its faculty roster to include more professors focused on teaching as opposed to research.”

With a satellite campus in Center City, Philadelphia, VSB specializes in part-time programs for working professionals, allowing them to enjoy the benefits of a full-time curriculum without leaving their job. In this vein, the school offers an accelerated, two-year, part-time Fast Track degree option, for which students meet twice a week, as well as the more customizable Flex Track degree option, which typically takes three years to complete and accommodates varying course loads.

One advantage of the accelerated option is the opportunity to partake in the school’s three-part capstone project, which includes the “Social Enterprise Consulting Practicum,” “Global Practicum,” and “Global Strategic Management” courses—each lasting 14 weeks. In the “Social Enterprise Consulting Practicum,” students work with local nonprofit organizations to identify strategies in such areas as branding, funding, and membership retention. Alternatively, the latter two courses entail working with a multinational corporation to gain firsthand experience analyzing market issues. VSB also hosts a variety of elective international immersion courses, through which students may travel abroad over winter break or during the summer.

Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management

Another option for professionals is Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management, whose two executive MBA programs focus on helping professionals gain their advanced business degrees while maintaining a career. Students can select the traditional executive MBA program, which features six residencies at Krannert and one abroad, or the IMM Global Executive MBA program, during which students are divided into cohorts and take part in residencies in each of the six IMM partner schools (including Krannert). Locations for the residencies include Brazil, China, and Italy. Both of these executive MBA programs take place over the course of 19 months and include online learning modules in addition to in-person studies.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 04 Oct 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: The Admissions Committee Will Not Noti

FROM mbaMission Blog: MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: The Admissions Committee Will Not Notice My Weakness(es)
Our clients frequently ask, “If I write the optional essay about my [low GMAT score, low GPA, bad semester in college, long stretch of unemployment, etc.], will it call attention to that weakness and overemphasize it?” In short, no. Writing the optional essay about a weakness will instead allow you to control the narrative about that issue and thereby better mitigate any negative effects it might have.

The admissions committee very likely will take note of a low GMAT score or a low GPA and will be left with unanswered questions about that weakness if you do not use the optional essay to address it. Rather than putting the committee in the position of having to guess at an explanation, take control of the situation and grab the opportunity to explain the details behind the weakness.

For example, let us say you have a weak GPA overall because you worked full time in your first two years of college, but your GPA from your last two years is much stronger. Not writing the optional essay means that you are hoping the admissions committee will take the time to search through your transcript, note the change in the GPA, and then examine your job history—then make the connection between your two years of full-time work and your subsequently lower grades during those years. On the other hand, if you use the optional essay to explain exactly what happened, you no longer have to simply hope that they will put in that extra effort and will know for sure that they are evaluating you using complete information. Likewise, they will not have to guess at the reason behind your low GPA, because you will have proactively filled in the story.

The bottom line is that the admissions committee is made up of professionals whose obligation is to examine all aspects of your profile. They are not punitive, but they are also not careless and will certainly note any weaknesses like those mentioned here. Keep in mind that these individuals are only human and are dealing with thousands of applications. Any way that you can save them time and effort by guiding them through the story of your application can only work to your advantage.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 06 Oct 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  Common Worries About the HBS Admissions Interview

FROM mbaMission Blog: Common Worries About the HBS Admissions Interview
[url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/devi-vallabhaneni.jpg][img]https://www.mbamission.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/devi-vallabhaneni-225x300.jpg[/img][/url]
Devi Vallabhaneni, mbaMission’s HBS Interviewer in Residence

Devi Vallabhaneni, an HBS graduate and former HBS MBA interviewer, is mbaMission’s HBS Interviewer in Residence, conducting [b][url=https://shop.mbamission.com/collections/services/products/hbs-in-person-intensive-interview-simulation]HBS Intensive Interview Simulations[/url][/b].

Being invited to interview with Harvard Business School (HBS) is unquestionably exciting and a positive step in your admissions journey, but it can also trigger a lot of concerns and questions. Here, I draw on my six years as an HBS interviewer to address some of the most common worries applicants have about the school’s interview, in hopes of easing any apprehension you may be feeling about your upcoming meeting.

[b]“I don’t know what to expect.”[/b]

The HBS interview is unlike any other business school interview or even a job interview. It is designed to meet the interviewee where they are, meaning that it conforms to the applicant’s style rather than following a preconceived format set by the school. It is dynamic, extremely personal, and tailored to the specific individual. The interviewer will read your entire application before your interview and will base their questions on that information. As a result, no two interviews are the same because no two applicants are the same. Do not let what you read online or have heard about someone else’s interview worry you. Those stories most likely do not apply to you.

[b]“I have limited presentation or public-speaking experience.”[/b]

The HBS interview is not a speech or a typical work presentation but more like a conversation between two business professionals. You do not need to prepare anything formal in advance, and having extensive presentation experience is certainly not required to have a successful interview. What is imperative is knowing yourself and your story extremely well. The interviewer will be focused on you as an individual, your potential contributions as an MBA student, and your career goals. Your personal communication style is less important.

[b]“I work in a very technical and complex field.”[/b]

HBS has interviewed candidates from all backgrounds, including science, technology, engineering, and medicine. Your interviewer’s goal is not to understand the technical details of your job but rather how you work and communicate, who you are as a person, how you think about your career, and what your values are. Think of your HBS interview as similar to a discussion you might have about your job with your company’s CEO, which would be a higher-level conversation, beyond the nuts and bolts.

[b]“I have a nontraditional background.”[/b]

This does not put you at a disadvantage. Whether you work at a start-up of just three people or with your parents and siblings in a family business, your HBS interview will unfold the same way it would for someone who works at IBM, Goldman Sachs, Google, or McKinsey & Company. You should feel confident in communicating your unique professional challenges and accomplishments. Your preparation for your HBS interview should be no different from that of someone who works at a larger or more conventional company.

[b]“I’m an international applicant.”[/b]

HBS is a global community and understands that some candidates might feel less comfortable with their ability to speak English. If you feel your English could use some polishing, that is a personal decision, and you should do what will make you most comfortable for your interview. You will not be penalized for verbal errors or accents because of the high-stress nature of the interview. Practice and prepare the same way you would for an important business meeting in English.

[b]“I work in consulting [or banking] and don’t know how to stand out.”[/b]

Your HBS interview is not about standing out per se. It is about viewing your background in the context of what you could contribute to the HBS community. This could include a particular high-impact project, a leadership position outside of work, or a post-MBA career goal that builds on your past professional experience. If you look at yourself as strictly “a consultant applicant” or “a banking applicant,” you will likely be limiting yourself in your self-perception. Instead, take your entire life story and career path into consideration when determining how to communicate who you are.

The bottom line is that everyone feels as though they have some kind of disadvantage in the interview process. This is the human condition. Preparation, self-reflection, and, most importantly, the ability to communicate clearly and succinctly are all key in mastering your HBS interview.

The admissions interview is an art, not a science—one with no hard and fast rules. I wish such rules did exist so that applicants would not worry so much. Imagine the application process as a relay race: your interviewer will pick up where your application left off and will strive to continue learning about you as a candidate. The interview is the next step after your written application and builds on what you have already shared with the HBS Admissions Board.

Practicing speaking about yourself and your accomplishments is important. Find a friend or family member to ask you questions so that you become more comfortable responding to personal queries and get better at delivering your most compelling information easily. Just as you did not write your final, polished application in a single sitting and draft, you will likely need to complete multiple “verbal drafts” before you feel ready for your HBS interview, and this—like the other issues I have covered here—is nothing to worry about.

I can assure you that your HBS interview is intended to help the school get to know you as a person, not just an applicant. You are more than the contents of your file, your work experience, and your primary accomplishments. HBS strives to admit each person as the individual they are, so let your genuine personality shine through in the most authentic way possible.

To learn more about mbaMission’s interview prep options for Harvard Business School applicants, [url=https://www.mbamission.com/blog/2020/09/30/hbs-interview-invitations-will-go-out-on-october-6-how-to-prepare/][b]click here[/b][/url]. If you believe you can benefit from one of our interview planning services—or simply would like some more information on the process—feel free to [b][url=https://www.mbamission.com/about/?display=contact]contact us[/url][/b] anytime!
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 07 Oct 2020, 10:00 ]
Post subject:  The Value of Current—and Enthusiastic—Community Service

FROM mbaMission Blog: The Value of Current—and Enthusiastic—Community Service
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MBA admissions committees try to identify applicants who are constantly active, challenging themselves in all spheres of their lives. As a result, extracurricular and community activities are not only powerful in showing an MBA candidate’s benevolence, but they also help create the impression that the applicant is steadily pursuing goals and is therefore predisposed to success.

We regularly encounter business school applicants who say, “I have been so busy professionally that I haven’t had time to volunteer, but I was really active during college.” In almost all cases, however, as candidates get further from their college years, their undergraduate experience becomes less and less relevant. Although having a record of consistent achievement throughout college and into one’s professional life is best, MBA applicants are often evaluated on a “What have you done for me lately?” basis—meaning that contemporary community service is generally more important.

MBA admissions officers know that finding time to commit to external activities can sometimes be challenging, but they still see many applicants from the most competitive fields who indeed find time to give back to others. So, if you had a rich and rewarding college experience filled with leadership, in short, keep that trend going. You have a powerful complement to your contemporary involvements, but not a substitute.

Showing enthusiasm for your volunteer work is as important as committing to the work itself. If you are slogging through your time as a volunteer, you are certainly not helping yourself or your candidacy. “Time served” is not the most important factor of your community work in the eyes of the MBA admissions committees—what is meaningful and revealing is the impact you have on others. Indeed, the spirit with which you have served your community is what will impress the committees.

As you consider your options for community involvement (and we hope you began doing so long before now), be sure to choose a cause or group about which you are passionate and to which you can commit yourself entirely. By dedicating yourself to an organization about which you are sincerely enthusiastic (just as you would do in choosing a job), you will naturally find yourself in situations that will lend themselves to quality essays and powerful recommendations.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 09 Oct 2020, 10:00 ]
Post subject:  All About Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT (Part 2)

FROM mbaMission Blog: All About Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT (Part 2)
With regard to the GMAT, raw intellectual horsepower helps, but it is not everything. Manhattan Prep’s Stacey Koprince teaches you how to perform at your best on test day by using some common sense.

In Part 1 of this article, we talked about the overall process for solving Critical Reasoning (CR) problems and reviewed the four major CR question types (the ones that show up most often on the test).

Now let’s take a look at the five minor types.

The Assumption Family

Assumption Family questions always involve a conclusion. This group consists of five subtypes, two of which are minor types:

Flaw: This is the “flip” of Find the Assumption. The author assumes something, but that thing might not be true. What is the flaw in the author’s reasoning?

Evaluate the Argument: What information would help to determine whether the conclusion is more or less likely to be valid?

The Evidence Family

Evidence Family questions really do not have conclusions (never “big” conclusions, like the Assumption arguments, and usually no conclusions at all). This group consists of two subtypes overall, but only one of these is a minor type:

Explain a Discrepancy: The argument contains some surprising information or outcome. Which answer choice provides some new information that clears up this surprising situation?

The Structure Family

Like Assumption questions, Structure questions do involve conclusions. The answer choices are usually in more “abstract” form, discussing characteristics of pieces of the argument. Both question types here are minor types.

Describe the Role: These are also known as boldface. The boldface portion plays what kind of role in the overall argument?

Describe the Argument: These are a variant of the boldface question, and they are so rare that I do not have an article for you. If you are really worried about these, you can take a look at our CR Strategy guide—but my best advice for you is not to worry about these.

Now what? Soon, we will talk about overall CR study strategies based on your scoring goals.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 10 Oct 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  Professor Profiles: Adam Grant, The Wharton School of the University o

FROM mbaMission Blog: Professor Profiles: Adam Grant, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania
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Many MBA applicants feel that they are purchasing a brand when they choose a business school. However, the educational experience you will have is what is crucial to your future, and no one will affect your education more than your professors. Today, we focus on Adam Grant from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

In addition to receiving multiple teaching awards at Wharton and having been named one of HR’s “Most Influential International Thinkers” in each biennial ranking since 2015, Adam Grant is also reportedly a student favorite. The author of New York Times bestsellers Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy (Knopf, 2017; co-authored with Sheryl Sandberg), Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World (Viking Press, 2016), and Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success (Viking Press, 2013; named one of the best books of the year by Amazon), and more than 60 articles, Grant has received numerous awards for his research on work motivation, including a Cummings Scholarly Achievement Award from the Academy of Management, the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution from the American Psychological Association, and a fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Grant’s books have been translated into 35 languages.

Grant was quoted in a past Bloomberg Businessweek profile of him as saying, “There is a long list of reasons that make me passionate about teaching, but every one revolves around the observation that we spend the majority of our waking hours at work, and there are many ways in which organizational psychology lets people lead more reward[ing] and productive work lives and makes the experience and organizations of others more productive, too.” In addition, Wharton students quoted by Poets&Quants once remarked of him, “I’m always struck by his humility (and humanity). It’s actually more like a bedside manner, almost like charisma, but more humble and personable” and “Adam is an amazing teacher and friend. In both my classes with him, he’s shown that in addition to being passionate about his subject matter, he really cares about his students. He also has an uncanny ability to remember the name of every student he teaches.”

For information on other defining characteristics of the MBA program at Wharton or any of 16 other top business schools, check out our free mbaMission Insider’s Guides.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 11 Oct 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  Earn an MBA in Canada at the Rotman School of Management or Ivey Busin

FROM mbaMission Blog: Earn an MBA in Canada at the Rotman School of Management or Ivey Business School
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University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

One of Canada’s top-ranked business schools for finance—the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management—was ranked third among Canadian MBA programs both by the Financial Times in 2020 and by Bloomberg Businessweek in 2019. Rotman underwent significant growth under the six-year deanship of Tiff Macklem, a foremost figure in the nation’s financial sector, whose tenure saw a prominent rise in Rotman’s academic profile and its reputation for financial education.

Macklem announced his plan to step down from his position in June 2020 to take over as the governor of the Bank of Canada. However, his temporary successor, Interim Dean Kenneth Corts, is no stranger to the field of finance himself. Before stepping in as dean, he was a professor of economic analysis and policy at the school, and he received a PhD in economics from Princeton University.

In addition to its finance-related strengths, Rotman offers a rather unique approach to core business pedagogy. Relying on what it terms “integrative thinking,” Rotman’s teaching model challenges the compartmentalization of traditional functional areas. Students complete a series of core courses in their first year that emphasize generalized business skills and the ability to think across functional disciplines. The Rotman Self-Developmental Lab, which offers feedback on the students’ communication style and behavioral performance via group workshops and personalized sessions with psychologists and management consultants, is also part of the first year of studies. The mission of the lab program, according to the school’s site, is to “develop and nurture [the students’] self-awareness and the interpersonal skills that are key to becoming an effective collaborative problem-solver.”

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Ivey Business School

In their second year, students are given the option to choose from among 16 different major areas, including Global Management, Social Impact and Sustainability, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, and Funds Management, while supplementing their focus with a broader array of nearly 100 elective courses.

Approximately 125 miles from Rotman, at the University of Western Ontario, stands Ivey Business School, which Bloomberg Businessweek ranked as the best Canadian MBA program in 2019–2020. The Ivey MBA program runs over the course of one year and is, according to the school’s website, designed for “high-achieving leaders who are ready to accelerate their career success.”

At Ivey, MBA students take part in real-world projects and can benefit from optional global learning opportunities and career management guidance, in addition to taking such core courses as “Leveraging Information Technology,” “Managing Financial Resources,” and “Communicating Effectively.” Study trips are available to Asia and South America during the electives period, while the Ivey Field Project allows students to form teams and work with real companies to find a solution for an issue or an opportunity before presenting their findings to the company. Students also have the option of developing an idea for a New Venture Ivey Field Project, creating a business plan for the idea, and presenting the pitch to a panel of external reviewers.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 12 Oct 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: You Need a 750 GMAT to Get into Busine

FROM mbaMission Blog: MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: You Need a 750 GMAT to Get into Business School
We often hear MBA applicants ask some form of the following question: “Do I need a 750 to get into a top MBA program?” Although a 750 on the GMAT can certainly be helpful, it is not a prerequisite. We wanted to dispel this myth and put some who believe it at ease. Here are a few simple reasons why this is just not true:

  • The average is lower. Average GMAT scores at the top MBA programs range from approximately 700 to 730. Clearly, if the high end of the GMAT average range is 730, the schools cannot expect applicants to have a 750. That would mean that every applicant would be above average, which is not possible. Still, if a candidate’s score falls below the average, this generally places a greater burden on the other components of the individual’s application—so, for example, maybe their work experience would need to be stronger than that of other applicants, or maybe their extracurriculars would need to stand out even more. The bottom line is that mathematically speaking, many people have a GMAT score below 750.
  • Too few applicants have a 750 or higher. The top MBA programs accept thousands of applicants each application season. Only approximately 2% of GMAT test takers earn scores of 750 or higher, and some are earned by people who do not ultimately apply to business school at all, do not apply to any of the leading schools, take the test only to become GMAT instructors, pursue an EMBA or part-time MBA instead, are rejected because other aspects of their profile render them uncompetitive… and the list goes on. Basically, the top MBA programs do not receive applications from enough applicants with 750s to entirely populate their incoming class, as evidenced by the schools’ mid-80% GMAT ranges, which are typically 660–760.
  • All schools accept the GRE. Applicants do not really even need to take the GMAT anymore. Of course, if you do take the GMAT, you should strive to achieve the highest score possible. However, if the GMAT is not even required, you obviously would not need to score a 750 to be accepted.
We want to be unequivocal: 750 is a great GMAT score, and anyone who earns that score should be delighted. However, if you do not fare as well on the exam, you should still be quite hopeful and keep a positive mind-set, because the admissions process is holistic.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 14 Oct 2020, 07:00 ]
Post subject:  Consider a Part-Time MBA—or an MBA Program in Europe!

FROM mbaMission Blog: Consider a Part-Time MBA—or an MBA Program in Europe!
We at mbaMission often receive questions about part-time MBA programs, so we thought we should offer a look at some of the pros and cons of this option.

As for the pros, the one that business school candidates cite most frequently is that the part-time MBA involves a limited opportunity cost. Unlike full-time MBA students, part-time ones do not miss out on two years of salary (and, in some cases, retirement savings) and can still earn raises and promotions while completing their studies. Furthermore, firm sponsorship seems to be more prevalent for part-time MBAs, so candidates who have this option can truly come out ahead, with a free education and continued earning throughout. Beyond the financial rationale, many part-time MBA students see an academic advantage; they can learn both in the classroom and at work and can then turn theory into practice (and vice versa) in real time, on an ongoing basis. Of course, a cynic might add that another pro is that part-time MBA programs are generally less selective. So, a candidate who may have had difficulty getting accepted to a traditional two-year program may have a better chance of gaining admission to a well-regarded school in its part-time program instead.

As for the cons, many part-time MBA candidates feel that the comparative lack of structure means that networking opportunities within the class are limited. While one part-time student could complete a school’s MBA program in two years, another might complete it in five. As a result, with candidates progressing through the program at such different paces, students will not likely see each other regularly in the same classes or at social events. In addition, in a traditional MBA environment, academics always come first; in a part-time environment, work typically comes first, and academics must come second or even third, after family. In other words, the full-time program generally involves greater intensity with regard to the classroom experience, given that it is the focal point of students’ lives. Another thing to consider is that some MBA programs do not offer their “star” faculty to part-time students—something that candidates should definitely ask about before enrolling—and offer limited access to on-grounds recruiting.

Of course, we are not trying to offer a definitive “answer” or present a bias for a particular kind of program; we are simply sharing some objective facts for candidates to consider as they make informed choices for themselves.

MBA candidates looking to broaden their business school choices could also consider European programs. Although many applicants who are competing for places at the top U.S. business schools are well aware of the strengths of the MBA programs at INSEAD and London Business School, even more options are available beyond these two, including IESEESADEOxford (Saïd), and Cambridge (Judge). These four schools in particular have been aggressively playing “catch-up” with their better-known brethren by raising funds and dedicating them to scholarships and to enhancing their global brands. Other candidates may also be aware that IMD offers a boutique MBA program with remarkable international diversity, highly regarded academics, and a strong reputation with international employers.

So, numerous options are available, and each can be explored on its own academic merit. But is earning your MBA in Europe, in itself, a good choice for you? For many applicants, the key issue is where they would like to be after completing their education. If you hope to work in Europe, these schools clearly offer an advantage over all but the top five or six U.S. schools—Harvard Business School, for example, can probably open as many doors in Europe as INSEAD can. However, if you hope to work in the States, the European schools will not provide the pipeline of opportunities that a top-ranked American school could, particularly for candidates who are targeting a niche industry or a company that is not a well-known international brand.

Still, beyond the employment picture, studying abroad offers intrinsic value. Spending two years in London, Fontainebleau, or Lausanne could certainly be its own reward.

For more information on various international business schools, including INSEAD, Cambridge Judge, and IMD, check out our free mbaMission International Program Guides.
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Author:  mbaMissionJenK [ 16 Oct 2020, 08:00 ]
Post subject:  All About Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT (Part 3)

FROM mbaMission Blog: All About Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT (Part 3)
With regard to the GMAT, raw intellectual horsepower helps, but it is not everything. Manhattan Prep’s Stacey Koprince teaches you how to perform at your best on test day by using some common sense.

In Part 1 of this series, we talked about the overall process for tackling Critical Reasoning (CR), as well as the four major CR question types. In Part 2, we reviewed the five minor question types. Now, let’s put it all together!



What is my strategy?


As we discussed in Part 1, the four major CR types are Find the Assumption, Strengthen, Weaken, and Inference. The majority of your CR questions will be in one of those four categories. If you are going for up to about 75th percentile on Verbal, concentrate on those.

Of the minor types, discussed in Part 2, the most common are Discrepancy, Describe the Role, and Evaluate. If you want to break the 75th percentile on Verbal, then also take a look at those three minor types, but still spend more time on the four major types. If CR is your weakest Verbal area, you can also skip whichever of those three minor types is hardest for you—some people really hate boldface questions, and others think Evaluate questions are the worst.

If you are looking to break the 90th percentile on Verbal, then you have to study everything. You can still pick one minor type as your “I will guess/bail quickly if I have to” question type, but you still have to try to learn how to do it and, during the test, take a crack at the question unless you are already behind on time and must bail on a question.

Great, I have mastered CR!

Let us test that theory, shall we? After you have studied all of the above and you feel pretty comfortable with CR, try this problem. I am not even going to tell you which type it is (in fact, that is one of the things that makes this problem so hard—what is it, in the first place?).

If you struggle with it, do not get discouraged. It is a very challenging problem. Instead, use it as an opportunity to get even better! By the way, the best outcome is not necessarily to get it right. Depending on your score goals and your other strengths and weaknesses, the best outcome may very well be to recognize that the question is too hard and to make a guess before the two-minute mark.

Happy studying!
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