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When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel

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When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2017, 16:41
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

76% (01:21) correct 24% (01:52) wrong based on 127 sessions

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When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel compresses; that is, its volume slightly decreases. Glass, however, is a fluid, so rather than compressing, it flows when put under pressure; its volume remains unchanged. Any portion of a sheet of glass that is under sustained pressure will very slowly flow to areas under less pressure. Therefore, if a single, extremely heavy object is placed in the middle of a horizontal sheet of glass of uniform thickness and if the glass is able to support the weight without cracking, then the sheet of glass will eventually_________.

Which one of the following most logically completes the argument?


A. become larger in size yet still be of uniform thickness
B. flow toward the point at which the pressure of the object is greatest
C. compress, although not as much as a piece of steel would
D. divide into exactly two pieces that are equal in neither size nor shape to the original piece of glass
E. be thinner in the portion of the glass that is under the pressure of the object than in those portions of the glass that are not under that pressure

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Re: When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2017, 17:03
The argument states " a sheet of glass that is under sustained pressure will very slowly flow to areas under less pressure"

Only E provides the logical conclusion
be thinner in the portion of the glass that is under the pressure of the object than in those portions of the glass that are not under that pressure
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Re: When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2017, 06:28
I am not totally clear about the argument, can anyone explain why correct answer is E plz?
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Re: When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2017, 08:34
lichting wrote:
I am not totally clear about the argument, can anyone explain why correct answer is E plz?


When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel compresses; that is, its volume slightly decreases. Glass, however, is a fluid, so rather than compressing, it flows when put under pressure; its volume remains unchanged. Any portion of a sheet of glass that is under sustained pressure will very slowly flow to areas under less pressure. Therefore, if a single, extremely heavy object is placed in the middle of a horizontal sheet of glass of uniform thickness and if the glass is able to support the weight without cracking, then the sheet of glass will eventually.

This is what we know about Glass. A Glass doesnt compress it flows when pressure is put & its volume doesnt change. When pressure is put it slowly flow to areas under less pressure

A says
become larger in size yet still be of uniform thickness. No. It doesn't. the argument doesnt say so.
Now lets see what E says
be thinner in the portion of the glass that is under the pressure of the object than in those portions of the glass that are not under that pressure.
Yes thats true. What will happen if heavy object is placed in the middle. We know Glass doesnt compress it flows when pressure is put So the portion of the glass that is under the pressure will be thinner than other portions.
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When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2018, 05:10
I don't think that this question qualifies for GMAT type question with 600-700 difficulty level.
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Re: When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2018, 08:05
gmatFalcon wrote:
When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel compresses; that is, its volume slightly decreases. Glass, however, is a fluid, so rather than compressing, it flows when put under pressure; its volume remains unchanged. Any portion of a sheet of glass that is under sustained pressure will very slowly flow to areas under less pressure. Therefore, if a single, extremely heavy object is placed in the middle of a horizontal sheet of glass of uniform thickness and if the glass is able to support the weight without cracking, then the sheet of glass will eventually_________.

Which one of the following most logically completes the argument?


A. become larger in size yet still be of uniform thickness
B. flow toward the point at which the pressure of the object is greatest
C. compress, although not as much as a piece of steel would
D. divide into exactly two pieces that are equal in neither size nor shape to the original piece of glass
E. be thinner in the portion of the glass that is under the pressure of the object than in those portions of the glass that are not under that pressure


(A) Change in size is not under consideration - Out of scope.
(B) Converse of what has been stated in the stimulus - Incorrect.
(C) Comparison with steel is not discussed.
(D) Division into pieces is not discussed - Out of context.

Thus, Answer must be (E)
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Re: When an ordinary piece of steel is put under pressure, the steel &nbs [#permalink] 19 Jul 2018, 08:05
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