It is currently 12 Dec 2017, 17:50

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught,

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 09 Feb 2015
Posts: 376

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 199

Location: India
Concentration: Social Entrepreneurship, General Management
GMAT 1: 690 Q49 V34
GMAT 2: 720 Q49 V39
GPA: 2.8
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 May 2017, 23:06
DmitryFarber wrote:
Youngleereal wrote:
the answer should be E. the imparting and encouraging actually tells us what he did during his teaching. it is more like a modifier rather than a parallel structure.
that is, he taught, imparting and encouraging rather than he taught, imparted and encouraged....


Agreed. The answer just seems to be missing the word "and" between "imparting" and "encouraging." I'm assuming that was just a mistake.


IMO , here imparting can be considered a consequence of teaching but how can we say encouraging was also a consequence of teaching.
Wouldn't it make more sense to make encouraged parallel to taught. Do we just pick the E because of a missing comma after and? I thought gmat doesn't test punctuation.
Can you please explain more on why E is the right answer and not D?

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 199

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 21 Nov 2016
Posts: 26

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 8

Re: When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2017, 08:48
Must be "E"

Imparting and Encouraging --> parallel --> modify Howard

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 8

CR Forum Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: The best is yet to come.....
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 499

Kudos [?]: 218 [0], given: 197

GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Oct 2017, 03:04
himanshumalhotra1990 wrote:
Nightmare007 wrote:
when he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught, imparted his knowledge to students to encourage them to be as successful as he once was.
a. imparted his knowledge to students to encourage
b. and he imparted his knowledge to students and encouraged
c. and imparting his knowledge to students encouraged
d. imparting his knowledge to students and encouraged
e. imparting his knowledge to students and encouraging

+kudos if you got it wrong .

Help required. Why i find this question put in a bad format.
I can't find parallelism here nor i can find it complete.


If I consider imparting knowledge and encouraging students as modifiers of Howard taught, option E seems correct.
However, consider this structure: Howard taught, imparting his knowledge to students and encouraged students... Here taught and encouraged should be parallel as in option D.
Is option D wrong because there is no comma after students? If there was a comma after students, would encouraged be considered parallel with taught?

Experts - Kindly comment if my understanding is correct. I faced a similar issue with another question. Any help here would be highly appreciated.

sayantanc2k mikemcgarry daagh egmat


Dear sayantanc2k mikemcgarry daagh egmat

Would you please comment on the unerstanding of himanshumalhotra1990?

My understanding is also same to his understanding. Is it correct?
_________________

Hasan Mahmud

Kudos [?]: 218 [0], given: 197

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 1148

Kudos [?]: 1261 [1], given: 30

Re: When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Oct 2017, 23:52
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
himanshumalhotra1990 wrote:
Nightmare007 wrote:
when he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught, imparted his knowledge to students to encourage them to be as successful as he once was.
a. imparted his knowledge to students to encourage
b. and he imparted his knowledge to students and encouraged
c. and imparting his knowledge to students encouraged
d. imparting his knowledge to students and encouraged
e. imparting his knowledge to students and encouraging

+kudos if you got it wrong .

Help required. Why i find this question put in a bad format.
I can't find parallelism here nor i can find it complete.


If I consider imparting knowledge and encouraging students as modifiers of Howard taught, option E seems correct.
However, consider this structure: Howard taught, imparting his knowledge to students and encouraged students... Here taught and encouraged should be parallel as in option D.
Is option D wrong because there is no comma after students? If there was a comma after students, would encouraged be considered parallel with taught?

Experts - Kindly comment if my understanding is correct. I faced a similar issue with another question. Any help here would be highly appreciated.

sayantanc2k mikemcgarry daagh egmat


himanshumalhotra1990 Mahmud6 There are a few problems with that interpretation of D.

First, yes, the lack of a comma is a problem. Without the comma, the word "and" clearly links the two adjoining items ("imparting" and "encouraged"). With the comma, we might in theory see "imparting his knowledge to students" as an aside between two parallel past tense verbs. However, this would still be ruined by the use of the pronoun "them." This clearly refers to the word "students" in the previous term. This links the two parts together, showing that the author's intent is for those two parts to work together. If we had any doubt, we might also notice that none of the other answer choices make "taught" and "encouraged" (or any form thereof) parallel. We'd only see a right answer that deviated from all the others if the other version had a clear flaw of meaning or grammar. To clarify the problem, simply take the proposed "modifier" out and see if the sentence still works:

When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught and encouraged them to be as successful as he once was.

Nope! We can drop D.
_________________


Dmitry Farber | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | New York


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews

Kudos [?]: 1261 [1], given: 30

Re: When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught,   [#permalink] 29 Oct 2017, 23:52

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 24 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

When he could no longer play violin himself, Howard taught,

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.