Check GMAT Club Decision Tracker for the Latest School Decision Releases https://gmatclub.com/AppTrack

It is currently 29 May 2017, 21:07

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Nov 2010
Posts: 220
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 38

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Nov 2011, 14:04
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
confused b/w C and E. Couldnt find an explanation for this.
Can anyone please explain.
_________________

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
MGMAT 6 650 (51,31) on 31/8/11
MGMAT 1 670 (48,33) on 04/9/11
MGMAT 2 670 (47,34) on 07/9/11
MGMAT 3 680 (47,35) on 18/9/11
GMAT Prep1 680 ( 50, 31) on 10/11/11

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
CR notes
http://gmatclub.com/forum/massive-collection-of-verbal-questions-sc-rc-and-cr-106195.html#p832142
http://gmatclub.com/forum/1001-ds-questions-file-106193.html#p832133
http://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-prep-critical-reasoning-collection-106783.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/how-to-get-6-0-awa-my-guide-64327.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/how-to-get-6-0-awa-my-guide-64327.html?hilit=chineseburned

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Nov 2010
Posts: 128
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 12

Re: SC : Instinct [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Nov 2011, 17:19
Economist wrote:
D. OA?

Why not C:

not a formally or prohibited means >> awkward...it should be not a formal or prohibited means
bigtreezl wrote:
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

a)which are not formally
b)which are not a formally
c)which is not a formally
d)which is formally not a
e)which is not formally


C


D distorts meaning and puts emphasis on formally [not a sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict] where C says it is not a formally sanctioned.
BSchool Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Flying over the cloud!
Joined: 17 Aug 2011
Posts: 887
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: International Business, Marketing
GMAT Date: 06-06-2014
GPA: 3.07
Followers: 74

Kudos [?]: 658 [0], given: 44

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Nov 2011, 17:26
Why E wrong? I think sanctioned and prohibited here play a role of adj. The word "means" is plural noun. Why we need "a" here

Posted from my mobile device
_________________

Rules for posting in verbal gmat forum, read it before posting anything in verbal forum
Giving me + 1 kudos if my post is valuable with you :)

The more you like my post, the more you share to other's need

CR: Focus of the Week: Must be True Question

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 14 Nov 2011
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Nov 2011, 17:31
... a case... a means... a verdict...
Parallel structure?

Ans: C

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 23 May 2010
Posts: 7
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Nov 2011, 18:45
+1 for c

Posted from my mobile device
1 KUDOS received
BSchool Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Flying over the cloud!
Joined: 17 Aug 2011
Posts: 887
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: International Business, Marketing
GMAT Date: 06-06-2014
GPA: 3.07
Followers: 74

Kudos [?]: 658 [1] , given: 44

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Nov 2011, 19:11
1
This post received
KUDOS
I knew the difference between C and E

c)which is not a formally (sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.)
e)which is not formally (sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.)

If we choose E, we have problem with S-V agreement, "his or her instinct are means", that make nonsense. We really need "a" here to resolve the problem with "means" whether this word is plural or singular. In this case, it is singular.

Here is the explanation in dictionary.com
Means (N)

1.Usually, means. (used with a singular or plural verb) an agency, instrument, or method used to attain an end: The telephone is a means of communication. There are several means of solving the problem.
2.
means,
a.
available resources, especially money: They lived beyond their means.
b.
considerable financial resources; riches: a man of means.
3.
something that is midway between two extremes; something intermediate: to seek a mean between cynicism and blind faith.
_________________

Rules for posting in verbal gmat forum, read it before posting anything in verbal forum
Giving me + 1 kudos if my post is valuable with you :)

The more you like my post, the more you share to other's need

CR: Focus of the Week: Must be True Question

Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 548
Location: United States
Concentration: International Business, General Management
GPA: 3.86
WE: Accounting (Commercial Banking)
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 238 [0], given: 16

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Dec 2011, 01:24
Can someone clearly explain the difference between C and D?

Thanks in advance :)
_________________

+1 Kudos If found helpful..

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Apr 2011
Posts: 279
Schools: Booth,NUS,St.Gallon
Followers: 5

Kudos [?]: 311 [0], given: 51

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Feb 2012, 23:34
It should be formal and prohibited ..i think it is a typo .
_________________

+1 if you like my explanation .Thanks :)

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10297
Followers: 1001

Kudos [?]: 225 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Oct 2013, 06:08
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 28 Apr 2013
Posts: 157
Location: India
GPA: 4
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 72 [0], given: 84

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Nov 2013, 07:13
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally


Good one;

Here there is clear cut explanation in the previous post about the answer choices. But i feel need explanation about why not D or Why not C ? The plot of the passage is court of law. In making the decision the juror needs to comply according to mentioned procedures in law. Which means that if the a procedure is documented in the law. D changes the meaning of the sentence as the procedure is mentioned as 'NOT SANCTIONED'. Is it possible? So the answer is C- which clear cut identifies the verb agreement error and meaning.

Hope that helps

:banana
_________________

Thanks for Posting

LEARN TO ANALYSE

+1 kudos if you like

Current Student
User avatar
Status: Everyone is a leader. Just stop listening to others.
Joined: 22 Mar 2013
Posts: 960
Location: India
GPA: 3.51
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Followers: 171

Kudos [?]: 1614 [0], given: 229

Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jun 2014, 04:48
C. gut instinct, which is not a formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

a formally sanctioned or prohibited means (SUBJECT SINGULAR) goes well with verb IS

formally (adverb) -- sanctioned or prohibited (both adjective) -- means (noun)

sanctioned or prohibited means (adjective + noun )

formally (adverb) is modifying adjectives sanctioned or prohibited.

Therefore, C is grammatically correct.
_________________

Piyush K
-----------------------
Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is to try just one more time. ― Thomas A. Edison
Don't forget to press--> Kudos :)
My Articles: 1. WOULD: when to use? | 2. All GMATPrep RCs (New)
Tip: Before exam a week earlier don't forget to exhaust all gmatprep problems specially for "sentence correction".

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10297
Followers: 1001

Kudos [?]: 225 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Nov 2015, 02:21
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 27 Aug 2016
Posts: 73
GMAT 1: 630 Q47 V30
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 148

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Feb 2017, 04:41
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally


Hi
In option choice C, the "a" before formally should also be present before prohibited thereby making the sentence as which is not a formally or "a" prohibited means of reaching a verdict...
As this is not the case I chose E
Where did I go wrong...pl help

Thanx
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 127
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Economics
Schools: Tuck
GMAT 1: 640 Q49 V30
GPA: 3.6
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 297

Premium Member
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Mar 2017, 00:18
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

C wins over D due to parallelism error

'a sanctioned or a prohibited means ' would have made D correct n better option.

correct me if i am wrong
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 21 Jan 2016
Posts: 86
Location: India
GMAT 1: 670 Q50 V30
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 99

Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Mar 2017, 05:49
Can someone explain the difference between C and D. I am still not convinced with explanations provided.
1 KUDOS received
BSchool Forum Moderator
avatar
G
Status: Aiming 800 Q51 V51
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 1717
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, International Business
GMAT 1: 670 Q50 V32
GMAT 2: 700 Q50 V34
GPA: 3.65
WE: Brand Management (Health Care)
Followers: 39

Kudos [?]: 406 [1] , given: 52

Premium Member Reviews Badge
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Mar 2017, 01:04
1
This post received
KUDOS
ankujgupta wrote:
Can someone explain the difference between C and D. I am still not convinced with explanations provided.


In D, there is a meaning change. Which is formally 'not a sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.' Notice that formally here modifies both sanctioned and prohibited'

While in C(or original question), We are given 'which is not a formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.'. So, here I could say formally modifies only sanctions. Hence, C is preferred over D as C maintain the original meaning.
_________________

Good Luck

Expert Post
Verbal Expert
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3045
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
Followers: 517

Kudos [?]: 2291 [0], given: 22

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Mar 2017, 11:23
ankujgupta wrote:
Can someone explain the difference between C and D. I am still not convinced with explanations provided.


Excellent explanation above by abhimahna. Basically in D the adverb "formally" modifies the verb "is", whereas in D the adverb "formally" modifies the adjective "sanctioned". The original sentence conveys the latter meaning.
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror   [#permalink] 06 Mar 2017, 11:23

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 37 posts ] 

    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
2 The more objective evidence a judge is presented with, the easier it i Mascarfi 4 22 Mar 2017, 17:26
1 How to identify what is being compared when multiple nouns are present Decmission2013 2 19 Jun 2015, 05:02
50 Experts publish their posts in the topic 'Evidence of' versus 'evidence that' egmat 11 26 Nov 2016, 00:43
1 When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror eybrj2 5 17 Apr 2015, 09:02
30 Experts publish their posts in the topic Some analysts contend that true capitalism exists only when sher676 40 25 Sep 2016, 22:36
Display posts from previous: Sort by

When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.