GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Aug 2018, 00:22

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3692
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Mar 2017, 01:04
2
ankujgupta wrote:
Can someone explain the difference between C and D. I am still not convinced with explanations provided.


In D, there is a meaning change. Which is formally 'not a sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.' Notice that formally here modifies both sanctioned and prohibited'

While in C(or original question), We are given 'which is not a formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.'. So, here I could say formally modifies only sanctions. Hence, C is preferred over D as C maintain the original meaning.
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Status: EAT SLEEP GMAT REPEAT!
Joined: 28 Sep 2016
Posts: 176
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 May 2018, 09:50
Whats wrong with E.Can any one explain?

ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

_________________

Regards,
Adi

Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3692
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 May 2018, 10:42
Adi93 wrote:
Whats wrong with E.Can any one explain?


Hey Adi93 ,

E is also causing meaning problem.

Distinction between a formally means vs formally means.

When you say formally means, you are actually changing the meaning of the sentence. "A formally means" - instinct is one of the various formally means. While formally means - instinct is the formally means.

Does that make sense?
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2018
Posts: 100
Location: United States (IL)
Concentration: Strategy, Operations
WE: Business Development (Other)
CAT Tests
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jun 2018, 04:58
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

-- "gut instinct" is singular so a and b are out.
-- D changes the meaning. It is now giving hint that "gut instinct" is formally not a sanctioned means but informally is. the original sentence is just saying it is not a formal means -
-- Between C and E , C is better as it using "a" clarifies the means is singular. Means can be singular / plural both. (I agree with above posts on this).
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec &nbs [#permalink] 07 Jun 2018, 04:58

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 25 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.