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Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of act

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Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of act  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2018, 23:08
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59% (01:27) correct 41% (01:44) wrong based on 70 sessions

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Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of activity prior to the transformation. The star LV-426 has recently been exhibiting signs of turbulent activity. In the past, scientists speculated over whether LV-426 could become a supernova, but dismissed the possibility since the star was dormant for a prolonged period of time. Given the star’s recent activity, it is now certain that LV-426 will explode in to a supernova.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the argument?

(A) Whether LV-426 is of the same size as other stars that have exploded into supernovas
(B) Whether other stars that became supernovas also exhibited periods of dormancy
(C) Whether turbulent activity can indicate that a star is about to transform into an entity other than supernova
(D) Whether a period of dormancy can reduce a star’s core temperature to a level at which the star can no longer exhibit surface-level activity
(E) Whether the scientists who studied LV-426 in the past considered the possibility that the star’s period of dormancy may not last
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Re: Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of act  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2018, 02:33
Explanation:

A) Whether LV-426 is of the same size as other stars that have exploded into supernovas(We are not told anything about the size hence irrelevant)
(B) Whether other stars that became supernovas also exhibited periods of dormancy(From argument we imply that either cases a star can become supernova)
(C)Whether turbulent activity can indicate that a star is about to transform into an entity other than supernova(answer to this question can undermine or strengthen the conclusion)
(D)Whether a period of dormancy can reduce a star’s core temperature to a level at which the star can no longer exhibit surface-level activity(In the argument we are told LV-426 is showing such activity after dormancy hence irrelevant)
(E)Whether the scientists who studied LV-426 in the past considered the possibility that the star’s period of dormancy may not last(Clearly irreverent- we are not concerned about past studies of LV-426)
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Status: Started with mock tests,Kaplan and manhattan score's below
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GMAT 1: 630 Q44 V33
GMAT 2: 680 Q47 V37
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Re: Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of act  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2018, 21:58
Probus wrote:
Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of activity prior to the transformation. The star LV-426 has recently been exhibiting signs of turbulent activity. In the past, scientists speculated over whether LV-426 could become a supernova, but dismissed the possibility since the star was dormant for a prolonged period of time. Given the star’s recent activity, it is now certain that LV-426 will explode in to a supernova.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in order to evaluate the argument?

(A) Whether LV-426 is of the same size as other stars that have exploded into supernovas
(B) Whether other stars that became supernovas also exhibited periods of dormancy
(C) Whether turbulent activity can indicate that a star is about to transform into an entity other than supernova
(D) Whether a period of dormancy can reduce a star’s core temperature to a level at which the star can no longer exhibit surface-level activity
(E) Whether the scientists who studied LV-426 in the past considered the possibility that the star’s period of dormancy may not last


My reasoning:
A.No mention of size in argument,so eliminate.
B.Dormancy mentioned,so keep it for now.
C.Turbulence related,keep this as well.
D.No mention of Temperature in argument ,so eliminate
E.No relation between dormancy duration and surges of activity,so eliminate.
That keeps B and C,I chose C since the crux of argument is star to supernova.Which option's( among B and C), answer as yes makes sure of this crux.So C.
_________________

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Ankit
Target Score:730+

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Re: Whenever a star transforms into a supernova, it exhibits surges of act &nbs [#permalink] 11 Jul 2018, 21:58
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