It is currently 21 Sep 2017, 09:21

Happening Now:

Live Chat with Amy Mitson, Sr. Associate Director of Admissions at Tuck Dartmouth


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Apr 2013
Posts: 2

Kudos [?]: 5 [2], given: 0

Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Apr 2013, 19:37
2
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

50% (01:18) correct 50% (00:47) wrong based on 355 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be the world's first novel.

(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be
(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as
(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji
(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be
(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be


IMO -- there's no right answer in any of these choices. Terrible question.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 5 [2], given: 0

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 54

Kudos [?]: 46 [0], given: 6

Schools: Booth '16
GMAT 1: 620 Q43 V32
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Apr 2013, 19:55
Indeed its terrible.

A,B,and C are clearly wrong ==> modifier issue
D and E are wrong because of wrong idiom ==> consider to be

IMO --> all answer choices are INcorrect

Kudos [?]: 46 [0], given: 6

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: struggling with GMAT
Joined: 06 Dec 2012
Posts: 206

Kudos [?]: 418 [0], given: 46

Location: Bangladesh
Concentration: Accounting
GMAT Date: 04-06-2013
GPA: 3.65
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Apr 2013, 23:01
forzajuventus wrote:
Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be the world's first novel.

(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be
(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as
(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji
(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be
(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be


IMO -- there's no right answer in any of these choices. Terrible question.


Its a terrible question.....here all answer are wrong.By the way how D can be the answer.in D here is idiom problem.....consider .........to be is wrong idiom

Kudos [?]: 418 [0], given: 46

Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jun 2012
Posts: 1127

Kudos [?]: 3404 [0], given: 123

Location: United States
Premium Member
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 00:08
Hi guys, D is correct.

You may think idiom "consider.... to be" is wrong, but it's not. It's RARELY used in real GMAT, in real GMAT, we're better off to stick with "consider X Y". (You can refer to Manhattan SC Gmat, idiom "consider X to be Y" is a suspect case, not wrong.)

However, in the passive voice sentence, idiom "X is considered by Y to be Z" is acceptable.

Hope it helps.
_________________

Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.

Kudos [?]: 3404 [0], given: 123

1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4272

Kudos [?]: 7599 [1], given: 360

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 01:24
1
This post received
KUDOS
(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be –A very obvious modification error. ; After the comma (court), the Tale of Genji, should come

(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as --- same as in A

(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji--------Same as in A and B

(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be --- In spite of the - to be – controversy, the best, I believe.

(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be --- What does which( leave alone the absence of comma before –which- ) modify: the Court. A horrible modification that compares the court to a novel

It is natural to get upset when we are forced to use consider to be in the place of just consider; But if the choices have unpardonable grammar errors, you might pass the idiomatic dilemma and cling on to a choice that does not have such a flagrant blunder. That way, IMO, D is passable as the best among the not so palatable.
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509

Kudos [?]: 7599 [1], given: 360

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Aug 2006
Posts: 113

Kudos [?]: 55 [1], given: 44

Location: United States
WE: Consulting (Telecommunications)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 05:48
1
This post received
KUDOS
daagh wrote:
(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be –A very obvious modification error. ; After the comma (court), the Tale of Genji, should come

(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as --- same as in A

(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji--------Same as in A and B

(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be --- In spite of the - to be – controversy, the best, I believe.

(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be --- What does which( leave alone the absence of comma before –which- ) modify: the Court. A horrible modification that compares the court to a novel

It is natural to get upset when we are forced to use consider to be in the place of just consider; But if the choices have unpardonable grammar errors, you might pass the idiomatic dilemma and cling on to a choice that does not have such a flagrant blunder. That way, IMO, D is passable as the best among the not so palatable.


Do we then have order of priority for errors like we have it in quant for mathematical operators?

Kudos [?]: 55 [1], given: 44

1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4272

Kudos [?]: 7599 [1], given: 360

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 06:37
1
This post received
KUDOS
May be priority is not so explicitly stated, but, it is a natural process. For example, a pronoun ambiguity is sometimes ignored by the GMAT; similarly, punctuation is not a great concern form GMAT. But still they are mistakes. CAn we cling on to them? In the given case, if we do not pardon the idiom aspect, the problem isn’t worth testing. That is why I said taht since it is not a GMAT question, let's at least practise other errors.
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509

Kudos [?]: 7599 [1], given: 360

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 16 Dec 2011
Posts: 426

Kudos [?]: 230 [1], given: 70

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 07:52
1
This post received
KUDOS
anilisanil wrote:
Do we then have order of priority for errors like we have it in quant for mathematical operators?

Normally GMAC prefers the following:
Correctness > Clarity > Concision

First priority is filter out grammatical mistakes.
Second priority is to check for ambiguity and redundancy.
Third to check for short and sweet option.

Kudos [?]: 230 [1], given: 70

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 08 Apr 2012
Posts: 128

Kudos [?]: 107 [1], given: 14

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 08:08
1
This post received
KUDOS
forzajuventus wrote:
Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be the world's first novel.

(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be
(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as
(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji
(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be
(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be


IMO -- there's no right answer in any of these choices. Terrible question.


AS noted by everyone, none of the option is "right" but D is the "best" of the lot. I guess daagh provided the best and to the point explanation.

However, if the question is actually taken from Kaplan, it must have been a very old version. The reason GMAC comes out with a new version of OG is that it deprecates some kinds of questions with time. "consider to be" is deprecated and will never appear on GMAT now. In fact, if you consider OG13, there are hardly any idiom questions. This is designed so that GMAT favors non-natives as well. Idioms come naturally to native speakers but not non-natives.

So I won't stress too much about "consider X to be Y" vs "consider X Y".
_________________

Shouvik
http://www.Edvento.com
admin@edvento.com

Kudos [?]: 107 [1], given: 14

1 KUDOS received
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 3348

Kudos [?]: 8739 [1], given: 1138

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 10:00
1
This post received
KUDOS
Sometimes there is the tendency on this board to consider a question terrible or not well written because:

- do not understand the question itself

- there is a lack of truly comprehension of the same.

- are followed the thoughts of others without thinking on your own, critically.

As such, I do not see nothing bad with it. Moreover, I see it as a good question maybe 650 level to practise and a bit tricky.

We have a dependet clause (indeed very long) and a indipendent clause to follow.

Not wrong with that, taking it with a grain of salt

regards
_________________

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS AND RESOURCES
Quant: 1. ALL GMATPrep questions Quant/Verbal 2. Bunuel Signature Collection - The Next Generation 3. Bunuel Signature Collection ALL-IN-ONE WITH SOLUTIONS 4. Veritas Prep Blog PDF Version 5. MGMAT Study Hall Thursdays with Ron Quant Videos
Verbal:1. Verbal question bank and directories by Carcass 2. MGMAT Study Hall Thursdays with Ron Verbal Videos 3. Critical Reasoning_Oldy but goldy question banks 4. Sentence Correction_Oldy but goldy question banks 5. Reading-comprehension_Oldy but goldy question banks

Kudos [?]: 8739 [1], given: 1138

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Apr 2013
Posts: 2

Kudos [?]: 5 [1], given: 0

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2013, 14:25
1
This post received
KUDOS
carcass wrote:
Sometimes there is the tendency on this board to consider a question terrible or not well written because:

- do not understand the question itself

- there is a lack of truly comprehension of the same.

- are followed the thoughts of others without thinking on your own, critically.

As such, I do not see nothing bad with it. Moreover, I see it as a good question maybe 650 level to practise and a bit tricky.

We have a dependet clause (indeed very long) and a indipendent clause to follow.

Not wrong with that, taking it with a grain of salt

regards


I disagree. Barring the blatant idiomatic error, the other errors in the other answer choices are pretty easy to spot, and I'm sure most people who answered this incorrectly feel the same. The main issue here is the debatable nature of the OA. From what I've seen, idioms in the GMAT world are black and white -- either they are used correctly or incorrectly. While there might be subjectivity in conciseness, diction, or style, there is no subjectivity to idioms in the GMAT world.

In response to your point: "- are followed the thoughts of others without thinking on your own, critically." -- if I had the liberty to critically think on my own on the GMAT, I would create a choice "F" and correct the idiom error. I don't know about you, but if the GMAC tells me that the sky is red, then I sure as hell am going to answer that the sky is red on the GMAT; and in the OG problems I've seen, the GMAC has established that "consider" is NOT followed by "to be".

Kudos [?]: 5 [1], given: 0

SVP
SVP
avatar
Status: Graduated
Affiliations: HEC
Joined: 28 Sep 2009
Posts: 1635

Kudos [?]: 680 [0], given: 432

Concentration: Economics, Finance
GMAT 1: 730 Q48 V44
Premium Member
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2013, 17:33
This type of question is uncommon and makes some test takers feel uncomfortable. You may encounter "consider x to be y" when the sentence is in passive form or when there are many words between x and y. In those cases, "to be" can remove ambiguity in the sentence. I should stress, however, that my explanation does not represent a concrete rule.

Again, though, this is a rare type of question. The best course of action is to remind yourself to choose the best answer choice available. And in this case, the best option is D.

Kudos [?]: 680 [0], given: 432

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 07 May 2012
Posts: 75

Kudos [?]: 165 [0], given: 27

Location: United States
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shiki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2013, 20:24
anilisanil wrote:
daagh wrote:
(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be –A very obvious modification error. ; After the comma (court), the Tale of Genji, should come

(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as --- same as in A

(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji--------Same as in A and B

(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be --- In spite of the - to be – controversy, the best, I believe.

(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be --- What does which( leave alone the absence of comma before –which- ) modify: the Court. A horrible modification that compares the court to a novel

It is natural to get upset when we are forced to use consider to be in the place of just consider; But if the choices have unpardonable grammar errors, you might pass the idiomatic dilemma and cling on to a choice that does not have such a flagrant blunder. That way, IMO, D is passable as the best among the not so palatable.


Do we then have order of priority for errors like we have it in quant for mathematical operators?



As a matter of fact , in this particular question , we do have a order of priority for errors in Sc too , esp like the one in this particular question.
1. A,B and C are outright wrong , cos of the modifier issue .
2. The usage of "which" in option E has no antecedent and hence incorrect.

Now as far as the usage of "considered to be" is concerned , this is a bit of a debatable issue . But in cases like this question , where other options clearly commit errors that cannot be debated , hold on to usages such as "considered to be" , rather than just eliminating them based on this usage.
I read it somewhere that , sometimes when you omit the "to be" in "considered by" , it can create confusion . And using "to be" in such scenario makes it clear.
eg : Tom cruise is considered by producers better than Brad .
The above sentence has it's share of ambiguity when it is not accompanied by "to be".

Tom cruise is considered by producers to be better than Brad .
makes it clear that Tom is considered better than Brad.

So , the take away from this question , I guess , would be to look for clear cut errors first . And if there are two grammatically error free options and one has "considered " and the other "considered to be ", in such a case , go ahead and pick the one that does not have "considered to be" ( cos idiomatically "considered" is superior to "considered to be"). But not to rule of the option in the first go , just cos it has a idiom that doesnt fall in our correct idiom usage list. Idioms are sometimes pardonable when compared with grammatical errors.
But in this particular problem , all four options are clearly wrong and hence D is the best of all.

HTH
Jyothi
_________________

Jyothi hosamani


Last edited by gmacforjyoab on 09 May 2013, 20:35, edited 1 time in total.

Kudos [?]: 165 [0], given: 27

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 09 Apr 2013
Posts: 208

Kudos [?]: 80 [0], given: 40

Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 710 Q44 V44
GMAT 2: 740 Q48 V44
GPA: 3.1
WE: Sales (Mutual Funds and Brokerage)
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2013, 20:34
It fascinates me, when reading responses to questions like these, how much of an unfair advantage I have by being a native english speaker.

"considered to be" is completely idiomatically correct.

"considered by many to be" is also an extremely common phrase and completely idiomatically correct. It didn't even register as a possible reason for invalidating option D when I read it.

Kudos [?]: 80 [0], given: 40

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 07 May 2012
Posts: 75

Kudos [?]: 165 [0], given: 27

Location: United States
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2013, 20:55
dave785 wrote:
It fascinates me, when reading responses to questions like these, how much of an unfair advantage I have by being a native english speaker.

"considered to be" is completely idiomatically correct.

"considered by many to be" is also an extremely common phrase and completely idiomatically correct. It didn't even register as a possible reason for invalidating option D when I read it.


Unfortunately , as far as GMAT is concerned , it is safe to play by the rule as opposed to ear . There are lot of constructions that seem perfectly fine in day to day usage, for most of them here , but the GMAT considers them wrong. ( eg - "Plan On" - I am planning on meeting them today . Sounds perfectly ok . we use "Plan on" more often than "Plan to" ( which is correct). But GMAT considers it wrong. So safe bet is to rely less on ear and more on the rules. Unfortunately it is GMAC's play ground and we gotta follow their rules.

Below is a post from one of the manhattan gmat tutors on this idiom . Thought it might help.

you could use all three in a non-GMAT context. It's risky to use the words "always" and "never" in any explanation of idioms!

However, our official GMAT stance is:
RIGHT: considers X Y (e.g. I consider her a friend.)
SUSPECT: considers X to be Y (e.g. The judge considers the law to be unconstitutional.)
WRONG: considers X as Y. (e.g. The judge considers the law as (being)unconstitutional.)

The exceptions that would justify "as" are too rare and difficult for the GMAT to risk testing. There would almost certainly be some other grammar issues that would allow you select the right answer, but if not, play it safe and pick "consider X Y."

_________________

Jyothi hosamani

Kudos [?]: 165 [0], given: 27

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 24 Apr 2013
Posts: 53

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 76

Schools: Duke '16
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2013, 21:11
Isnt there always going to be an answer in a GMAT question. That is why i chose the answer to be C cause i cudnt figure out which one it could be

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 76

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 21 Jan 2010
Posts: 329

Kudos [?]: 222 [0], given: 12

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 May 2013, 18:09
forzajuventus wrote:
Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be the world's first novel.

(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be
(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as
(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji
(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be
(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be


IMO -- there's no right answer in any of these choices. Terrible question.


After warm the thing being describe should come. Hence eliminate A,B and C. In E the use of which is wrong. Which is referring too - The Tale of Genji and it's very far away from the modifier which....... Not a clear and crisp as the GMAT likes it. Hence D.

Kudos [?]: 222 [0], given: 12

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10170

Kudos [?]: 253 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jun 2017, 00:56
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 253 [0], given: 0

Director
Director
avatar
S
Joined: 12 Nov 2016
Posts: 743

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 157

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2017, 15:35
forzajuventus wrote:
Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be the world's first novel.

(A) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji to be
(B) Shikibu in the manner of a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji as
(C) Shikibu, a fictionalized accounting for political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, literary historians consider The Tale of Genji
(D) Shikibu as a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court, The Tale of Genji is considered by literary historians to be
(E) Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a fictionalized account of political and romantic intrigue in the Japanese imperial court which literary historians consider to be


IMO -- there's no right answer in any of these choices. Terrible question.


The correct idiom is "consider x y" therefore A, B and E are clearly wrong. You have to be careful, however. The term "considered to be" is not idiomatically in correct. Thus D is the most correct answer.

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 157

Re: Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki   [#permalink] 18 Aug 2017, 15:35
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
2 Doctors in the early 20th century commonly mistook vibhav 18 07 Sep 2013, 10:04
18 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC Early 16th Century moralist philosophers, particularly in jitbec 25 11 Jan 2016, 02:06
42 In the early part of the twentieth century, many vacationers seofah 20 26 Aug 2017, 05:11
7 A famed alchemist in the early sixteenth century beattheheat 14 09 Sep 2017, 04:55
10 In the early twentieth century, an extraordinary painter gmatjon 10 15 Sep 2015, 15:11
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Written in the early eleventh century by Lady Murasaki

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.