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CR: Difference between position and claim

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CR: Difference between position and claim [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2006, 15:50
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Can someone explain the difference between position and claim in Critical Reasoning?

The BF questions are putting emphasis on these.

Thanks!
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Dec 2006, 21:07
Can anyone answer this please?
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Re: CR: Difference between position and claim [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2006, 05:03
trivikram wrote:
Can someone explain the difference between position and claim in Critical Reasoning?

The BF questions are putting emphasis on these.

Thanks!


Hey Vikki, it would be great if u can post two questions that ask position and claim. That would help us in discussing. Thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2006, 16:41
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2006, 22:53
Checked the question. Spent a lot of time to understand difference between position and claim. No great help. These words seem to have been used interchangeably.

As you know, position is used to represent a particular stand. Where as a claim reflects the position.

Devil's advocate is a position. His utterance is a claim.

But in the question there does nt seem to be so much of clear cut difference between these two.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2006, 03:44
aurobindo wrote:
Checked the question. Spent a lot of time to understand difference between position and claim. No great help. These words seem to have been used interchangeably.

As you know, position is used to represent a particular stand. Where as a claim reflects the position.

Devil's advocate is a position. His utterance is a claim.

But in the question there does nt seem to be so much of clear cut difference between these two.


Exactly I was in the same dilemma....I wasnt able to proceed further from here

What is meant by claim reflecting the position? Is it supporting it?
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2006, 09:12
trivikram wrote:
aurobindo wrote:
Checked the question. Spent a lot of time to understand difference between position and claim. No great help. These words seem to have been used interchangeably.

As you know, position is used to represent a particular stand. Where as a claim reflects the position.

Devil's advocate is a position. His utterance is a claim.

But in the question there does nt seem to be so much of clear cut difference between these two.


Exactly I was in the same dilemma....I wasnt able to proceed further from here

What is meant by claim reflecting the position? Is it supporting it?


yes. We can perhaps understand it that way. If Bill Gates claims that open source technologies can never be fully reliable, then his claim is consistent with his position. Because Microsoft can never digest the fact that software industry is not its fiefdom. Its position is that only Windows is the genuine, and reliable operating system..(i am exaggerating guys..) :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2006, 17:58
aurobindo wrote:
trivikram wrote:
aurobindo wrote:
Checked the question. Spent a lot of time to understand difference between position and claim. No great help. These words seem to have been used interchangeably.

As you know, position is used to represent a particular stand. Where as a claim reflects the position.

Devil's advocate is a position. His utterance is a claim.

But in the question there does nt seem to be so much of clear cut difference between these two.


Exactly I was in the same dilemma....I wasnt able to proceed further from here

What is meant by claim reflecting the position? Is it supporting it?


yes. We can perhaps understand it that way. If Bill Gates claims that open source technologies can never be fully reliable, then his claim is consistent with his position. Because Microsoft can never digest the fact that software industry is not its fiefdom. Its position is that only Windows is the genuine, and reliable operating system..(i am exaggerating guys..) :wink:


Wow good one.....

Looks like you arent particularly impressed with MS products... :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2006, 07:17
hey, here is a question that has something do with position..guess..what is the answer? :wink:

After graduating from high school, people rarely multiply fractions or discuss ancient Rome, but they are confronted daily with decisions relating to home economics. Yet whereas mathematics and history are required courses in the high school curriculum, home economics is only an elective, and few students choose to take it.
Which of the following positions would be best supported by the considerations above?
(A) If mathematics and history were not required courses, few students would choose to take them.
(B) Whereas home economics would be the most useful subject for people facing the decisions they must make in daily life, often mathematics and history can also help them face these decisions.
(C) If it is important to teach high school students subjects that relate to decisions that will confront them in their daily lives, then home economics should be made an important part of the high school curriculum.
(D) Mathematics, history, and other courses that are not directly relevant to a person’s daily life should not be a required part of the high school curriculum.
(E) Unless high schools put more emphasis on nonacademic subjects like home economics, people graduating from high school will never feel comfortable about making the decisions that will confront them in their daily lives.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2006, 16:40
After graduating from high school, people rarely multiply fractions or discuss ancient Rome, but they are confronted daily with decisions relating to home economics. Yet whereas mathematics and history are required courses in the high school curriculum, home economics is only an elective, and few students choose to take it.
Which of the following positions would be best supported by the considerations above?
(A) If mathematics and history were not required courses, few students would choose to take them.
We cannot assume things and here it is a tad out of scope

(B) Whereas home economics would be the most useful subject for people facing the decisions they must make in daily life, often mathematics and history can also help them face these decisions.
Text in blue is OK but in RED is no-no
(C) If it is important to teach high school students subjects that relate to decisions that will confront them in their daily lives, then home economics should be made an important part of the high school curriculum.

This is my answer. Give them what they need in their daily lives

(D) Mathematics, history, and other courses that are not directly relevant to a person’s daily life should not be a required part of the high school curriculum.

Wrong deduction and hence not a position since we have to find something that relates to daily life support

(E) Unless high schools put more emphasis on nonacademic subjects like home economics, people graduating from high school will [color=red]never feel comfortable about making the decisions that will confront them in their daily lives.[/color]

Close, but text in bold is too stringent
***********************************************************
Claim : people rarely multiply fractions or discuss ancient Rome, but they are confronted daily with decisions relating to home economics
*******************************************************

looks like C

I understand position as a factor in alignment with claim(or which supports the claim though not substantiating the claim)

C does that here

Please correct me gurus :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2006, 18:25
I think claim and position does not have much difference. Just ask: what is the author claiming? what is the author's position?

From the questions I did, most of them have clear differences in other parts of the sentence. so when u see 2 choices where one has a 'claim', the other a 'position', look at other differences first.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2006, 19:26
tennis_ball wrote:
I think claim and position does not have much difference. Just ask: what is the author claiming? what is the author's position?

From the questions I did, most of them have clear differences in other parts of the sentence. so when u see 2 choices where one has a 'claim', the other a 'position', look at other differences first.


And tennis thats what I wasnt able to decipher :-D

BUt our bud Aurobindo helped me...Thanks dude
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2006, 01:32
trivikram wrote:
After graduating from high school, people rarely multiply fractions or discuss ancient Rome, but they are confronted daily with decisions relating to home economics. Yet whereas mathematics and history are required courses in the high school curriculum, home economics is only an elective, and few students choose to take it.
Which of the following positions would be best supported by the considerations above?
(A) If mathematics and history were not required courses, few students would choose to take them.
We cannot assume things and here it is a tad out of scope

(B) Whereas home economics would be the most useful subject for people facing the decisions they must make in daily life, often mathematics and history can also help them face these decisions.
Text in blue is OK but in RED is no-no
(C) If it is important to teach high school students subjects that relate to decisions that will confront them in their daily lives, then home economics should be made an important part of the high school curriculum.

This is my answer. Give them what they need in their daily lives

(D) Mathematics, history, and other courses that are not directly relevant to a person’s daily life should not be a required part of the high school curriculum.

Wrong deduction and hence not a position since we have to find something that relates to daily life support

(E) Unless high schools put more emphasis on nonacademic subjects like home economics, people graduating from high school will [color=red]never feel comfortable about making the decisions that will confront them in their daily lives.[/color]

Close, but text in bold is too stringent
***********************************************************
Claim : people rarely multiply fractions or discuss ancient Rome, but they are confronted daily with decisions relating to home economics
*******************************************************

looks like C

I understand position as a factor in alignment with claim(or which supports the claim though not substantiating the claim)

C does that here

Please correct me gurus :-D


ur right..OA is C.
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Re: CR: Difference between position and claim [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2012, 15:21
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I don't really know why I am replying to a 6 year old thread,

but here goes

Position - Its the conclusion of the argument.

Claim - Its an assertion in support of the conclusion.
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Re: CR: Difference between position and claim   [#permalink] 28 Dec 2012, 15:21
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