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Advanced grammar points

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Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Sep 2009
Posts: 396
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Schools: ROSS PT 2012
WE 1: Mech Engineer - General Electric - 2yrs
WE 2: Lead Mech Engineer - Ingersoll Rand - 4 yrs
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 25 [0], given: 5

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Re: Advanced grammar points [#permalink] New post 06 Nov 2009, 06:26
Here is one more. Absolute constructions --> Don't confuse them with Dangling modifiers

Absolute constructions consist of a noun and some kind of modifier, the most common being a participle. Because they often come at the beginning of a sentence, they are easily confused with dangling participles. But an absolute construction modifies the rest of the sentence, not the subject of the sentence (as a participial phrase does). You can use absolute constructions to compress two sentences into one and to vary sentence structure as a means of holding a reader’s interest. Here are some examples:

No other business arising, the meeting was adjourned.
The paint now dry, we brought the furniture out on the deck.
The truck finally loaded, they said goodbye to their neighbors and drove off.
The horse loped across the yard, her foal trailing behind her.

Constructions like these are used more often in writing than in speaking, where it is more common to use a full clause: When the paint was dry, we brought the furniture out on the deck. There are, however, many fixed absolute constructions that occur frequently in speech:

The picnic is scheduled for Saturday, weather permitting.
Barring bad weather, we plan to go to the beach tomorrow.
All things considered, it’s not a bad idea.

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Correct me if I am wrong -
1. Isn't the order of an absolute phrase interchangeable(Ab phrase,clause / clause,absolute phrase) - Is this a rule or is it something that is "usually" true?
The paint now dry, we brought the furniture out on the deck. - the absolute phrase(seems to have a causal relation to the main clause) I dont think it would be correct to say : We brought the furniture out on the deck, the paint now dry (it sounds more like effect > cause - maybe this construction is acceptable).
2. I have seen similar construction(s) : main clause,absolute phrase (where the absolute phrase concludes a thought or describes the result of a hypothesis in the attached clause).
Ex. Historians have found X in Y(place/geographical feature et.al), results that suggest Z. (In this construction the order of the absolute phrase and clause cannot be inverted (I think)).
On a different note:
X walked into the class,his head held high
His head held high, X walked into the class

Both of these constructions are correct.

Any comments?
Manager
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Joined: 23 Oct 2010
Posts: 87
Location: India
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Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 6

Re: Advanced grammar points [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2010, 08:22
Shouldn't this : "The horse loped across the yard, her foal trailing behind her"
be
The horse loped across the yard, her foal trailing behind her
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Sep 2009
Posts: 396
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Schools: ROSS PT 2012
WE 1: Mech Engineer - General Electric - 2yrs
WE 2: Lead Mech Engineer - Ingersoll Rand - 4 yrs
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 25 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Advanced grammar points [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2010, 08:47
Shouldn't this : "The horse loped across the yard, her foal trailing behind her"
be
The horse loped across the yard, her foal trailing behind her

I guess you forgot to write the variant.
Re: Advanced grammar points   [#permalink] 23 Dec 2010, 08:47
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