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balance ............

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balance ............ [#permalink] New post 11 Jun 2004, 21:28
9.It takes a deft balance between savings discipline, investment knowledge, risk taking, luck, and time to raise a million dollars through investments.

(A) It takes a deft balance between
(B) Deft balancing is needed between
(C) Deftly balanced, it takes
(D) It takes a deft balance of
(E) A deft balance is what one needs among
Pls explain the answer......
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jun 2004, 22:26
E is my FA. If it was just two elements then B would make sense.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 01:34
I think E is idiomatically correct.
I go with E
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 01:46
There's nothing wrong with A.

When more than two entities are involved or when the number of entities is unspecified, the word choice depends on what you want to say. You use between when the entities are considered as distinct individuals and among when they are considered as a mass or collectivity. Thus in the sentence The balloon landed between the houses, the houses are seen as points that define the boundaries of the area where the balloon touched down. We assume, therefore, that the balloon did not land on any of the individual houses. In The balloon landed among the houses, the area of landing is considered to be the general location of the houses, taken together. It leaves open the possibility that the balloon came down on one of the houses. By the same token, we may speak of a series of wars between the Greek cities, which suggests that each city was an independent participant in the hostilities, or of a series of wars among the Greek cities, which allows for the possibility that the participants were shifting alliances of cities. For this reason, among is used to indicate inclusion in a group: She is among the best of our young sculptors. There is a spy among you. Use between when the entities are seen as determining the limits or endpoints of a range: They searched the area between the river, the farmhouse, and the woods. The truck driver had obviously been drinking between stops.

Other choices are awkward.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 05:00
I believe all answer choices have typos.

It is ok to use balance between A and B

and
balance among A,B, and C

or

balance between (A,B, and C)(collectively taken), and D
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 07:05
I, on the contrary, believe that the correct choice is D.

I haven't found 'balance of' in the idiom list yet, but it's in the Random House Dictionary.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 07:06
Anonymous wrote:
I, on the contrary, believe that the correct choice is D.

I haven't found 'balance of' in the idiom list yet, but it's in the Random House Dictionary.


Sorry, that was me, I forgot to sign in! :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 07:47
ob wrote:
There's nothing wrong with A.

When more than two entities are involved or when the number of entities is unspecified, the word choice depends on what you want to say. You use between when the entities are considered as distinct individuals and among when they are considered as a mass or collectivity. Thus in the
Other choices are awkward.


Going by your explaination, then I guess, B makes more sense.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 08:42
SmashingGrace wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I, on the contrary, believe that the correct choice is D.

I haven't found 'balance of' in the idiom list yet, but it's in the Random House Dictionary.


Sorry, that was me, I forgot to sign in! :-D


I bet it’s in phrases like “balance of paymentsâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 10:06
ob wrote:
SmashingGrace wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I, on the contrary, believe that the correct choice is D.

I haven't found 'balance of' in the idiom list yet, but it's in the Random House Dictionary.


Sorry, that was me, I forgot to sign in! :-D


I bet it’s in phrases like “balance of paymentsâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2004, 18:03
I agree with SmashingGrace and Anandnk. ob, your examples are great. However, I don't believe they apply to the enumeration at hand.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2004, 01:30
FA is D
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2004, 14:48
OA is D ...i had marked E ...
As per dicussed by anand between (a,b and c)collectively and d ...
here and is missing in the first set ...
Can anybody explain why D is correct ...
I thing SmashingGrace is correct ...but then what ob has explained also seemed correct ....
Anybody having any directions........ :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 10:01
ob wrote:
There's nothing wrong with A.

When more than two entities are involved or when the number of entities is unspecified, the word choice depends on what you want to say. You use between when the entities are considered as distinct individuals and among when they are considered as a mass or collectivity. Thus in the sentence The balloon landed between the houses, the houses are seen as points that define the boundaries of the area where the balloon touched down. We assume, therefore, that the balloon did not land on any of the individual houses. In The balloon landed among the houses, the area of landing is considered to be the general location of the houses, taken together. It leaves open the possibility that the balloon came down on one of the houses. By the same token, we may speak of a series of wars between the Greek cities, which suggests that each city was an independent participant in the hostilities, or of a series of wars among the Greek cities, which allows for the possibility that the participants were shifting alliances of cities. For this reason, among is used to indicate inclusion in a group: She is among the best of our young sculptors. There is a spy among you. Use between when the entities are seen as determining the limits or endpoints of a range: They searched the area between the river, the farmhouse, and the woods. The truck driver had obviously been drinking between stops.

Other choices are awkward.


The correct usage is the balloon landed in the midst of the houses or amidst the houses - not in between the houses
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 11:12
Mayur wrote:
ob wrote:
There's nothing wrong with A.

When more than two entities are involved or when the number of entities is unspecified, the word choice depends on what you want to say. You use between when the entities are considered as distinct individuals and among when they are considered as a mass or collectivity. Thus in the sentence The balloon landed between the houses, the houses are seen as points that define the boundaries of the area where the balloon touched down. We assume, therefore, that the balloon did not land on any of the individual houses. In The balloon landed among the houses, the area of landing is considered to be the general location of the houses, taken together. It leaves open the possibility that the balloon came down on one of the houses. By the same token, we may speak of a series of wars between the Greek cities, which suggests that each city was an independent participant in the hostilities, or of a series of wars among the Greek cities, which allows for the possibility that the participants were shifting alliances of cities. For this reason, among is used to indicate inclusion in a group: She is among the best of our young sculptors. There is a spy among you. Use between when the entities are seen as determining the limits or endpoints of a range: They searched the area between the river, the farmhouse, and the woods. The truck driver had obviously been drinking between stops.

Other choices are awkward.


The correct usage is the balloon landed in the midst of the houses or amidst the houses - not in between the houses


The passage comes from the American Heritage Dictionary of English Usage. I believe any objections should be directed to the publisher. :)
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 11:25
guys

just a request:

whenever we quote a passage from anywhere, whether it is copyrighted or not, we should make a clear reference to it and give proper credit to the authors , if there are names mentioned.

hope you guys agree. have a nice day :)
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2005, 12:44
Why D is better over E?
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