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Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency

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Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2007, 14:31
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A
B
C
D
E

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Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency distribution of letters and letter sequences, was the standard typewriter keyboard designed?

Cora: To ask this question, you must be making a mistaken assumption: that typing speed was to be maximized. The real danger with early typewriters was that operators would hit successive keys too quickly, thereby crashing typebars into each other, bending connecting wires and so on. So the idea was to slow the operator down by making the most common letter sequences awkward to type.

Bernand: This is surely not right! These technological limitations have long since vanished, yet the keyboard is still as it was then.

Which one of the following, if true, could be used by Cora to counter Bernard’s rejection of her explanation?

(A) Typewriters and word-processing equipment are typically sold to people who have learned to use the standard keyboard and who, therefore, demand it in equipment they buy.
(B) Typewriters have been superseded in most offices by word-processing equipment, which has inherited the standard keyboard from typewriters.
(C) The standard keyboard allows skilled operators to achiever considerable typing speeds, thought it makes acquiring such skills relatively difficult.
(D) A person who has learned one keyboard layout can readily learn to use a second one in place of the first, but only with difficulty learn to use a second one alongside the first.
(E) It is now possible to construct typewriter and word-processing equipment in which a single keyboard can accommodate two or even more different keyboard layouts, each accessible to the operator at will.


I could not understand the highlighted part.
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2007, 16:46
whoops double post

Last edited by beckee529 on 17 Aug 2007, 16:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2007, 16:47
Fistail wrote:
Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency distribution of letters and letter sequences, was the standard typewriter keyboard designed?

Cora: To ask this question, you must be making a mistaken assumption: that typing speed was to be maximized. The real danger with early typewriters was that operators would hit successive keys too quickly, thereby crashing typebars into each other, bending connecting wires and so on. So the idea was to slow the operator down by making the most common letter sequences awkward to type.

Bernand: This is surely not right! These technological limitations have long since vanished, yet the keyboard is still as it was then.

Which one of the following, if true, could be used by Cora to counter Bernard’s rejection of her explanation?

(A) Typewriters and word-processing equipment are typically sold to people who have learned to use the standard keyboard and who, therefore, demand it in equipment they buy.
(B) Typewriters have been superseded in most offices by word-processing equipment, which has inherited the standard keyboard from typewriters.
(C) The standard keyboard allows skilled operators to achiever considerable typing speeds, thought it makes acquiring such skills relatively difficult.
(D) A person who has learned one keyboard layout can readily learn to use a second one in place of the first, but only with difficulty learn to use a second one alongside the first.
(E) It is now possible to construct typewriter and word-processing equipment in which a single keyboard can accommodate two or even more different keyboard layouts, each accessible to the operator at will.


I could not understand the highlighted part.


Bernand: This is surely not right! These technological limitations have long since vanished, yet the keyboard is still as it was then.

the "technological limitations" eliminated referred here is how operators overcame the obstacle of the absence of common letter sequences. So in other words, Bernand is saying why are the keyboard keys still designed the way they are even though operators can now type just as fast (with the ackward sequence not being a problem anymore).


the answer should be C
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2007, 19:28
Fistail wrote:
Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency distribution of letters and letter sequences, was the standard typewriter keyboard designed?

Cora: To ask this question, you must be making a mistaken assumption: that typing speed was to be maximized. The real danger with early typewriters was that operators would hit successive keys too quickly, thereby crashing typebars into each other, bending connecting wires and so on. So the idea was to slow the operator down by making the most common letter sequences awkward to type.

Bernand: This is surely not right! These technological limitations have long since vanished, yet the keyboard is still as it was then.

Which one of the following, if true, could be used by Cora to counter Bernard’s rejection of her explanation?

(A) Typewriters and word-processing equipment are typically sold to people who have learned to use the standard keyboard and who, therefore, demand it in equipment they buy.
(B) Typewriters have been superseded in most offices by word-processing equipment, which has inherited the standard keyboard from typewriters.
(C) The standard keyboard allows skilled operators to achiever considerable typing speeds, thought it makes acquiring such skills relatively difficult.
(D) A person who has learned one keyboard layout can readily learn to use a second one in place of the first, but only with difficulty learn to use a second one alongside the first.
(E) It is now possible to construct typewriter and word-processing equipment in which a single keyboard can accommodate two or even more different keyboard layouts, each accessible to the operator at will.

I could not understand the highlighted part.


Well my answer would be D .
To answer your red part : Well Bernard is saying ..Cora you said because of over use of some keys wires could get weared quicky thats why they placed the awkwardly ...but now technology so great that those wires may never get weared down..so why the hell keys placement didnt change.So how should Cora reply to this is what this question is asking .
He has to prove that a person who is use to one type of style will face difficulty is learning the second one ..I think D makes that clear.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2007, 21:55
I think its B.

His counter argument is that. the word processing systems of today inherited the keyboard from the type writer which has the earlier problems.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2007, 03:17
I think only C makes sense...rest are out of scope.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2007, 04:45
C for me.
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2007, 06:21
Fistail wrote:
Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency distribution of letters and letter sequences, was the standard typewriter keyboard designed?

Cora: To ask this question, you must be making a mistaken assumption: that typing speed was to be maximized. The real danger with early typewriters was that operators would hit successive keys too quickly, thereby crashing typebars into each other, bending connecting wires and so on. So the idea was to slow the operator down by making the most common letter sequences awkward to type.

Bernand: This is surely not right! These technological limitations have long since vanished, yet the keyboard is still as it was then.

Which one of the following, if true, could be used by Cora to counter Bernard’s rejection of her explanation?

(A) Typewriters and word-processing equipment are typically sold to people who have learned to use the standard keyboard and who, therefore, demand it in equipment they buy.
(B) Typewriters have been superseded in most offices by word-processing equipment, which has inherited the standard keyboard from typewriters.
(C) The standard keyboard allows skilled operators to achiever considerable typing speeds, thought it makes acquiring such skills relatively difficult.
(D) A person who has learned one keyboard layout can readily learn to use a second one in place of the first, but only with difficulty learn to use a second one alongside the first.
(E) It is now possible to construct typewriter and word-processing equipment in which a single keyboard can accommodate two or even more different keyboard layouts, each accessible to the operator at will.


I could not understand the highlighted part.


thanx guys. but OA is A.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2007, 09:03
What was I thinking in choosing C...If the typewriters were designed for use of a specific segment of the population then A totally makes sense and counters Bernad's argument...any thoughts??
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 05 Jul 2009, 00:00
Fistail wrote:
Fistail wrote:
Bernand: For which language, and thus which frequency distribution of letters and letter sequences, was the standard typewriter keyboard designed?

Cora: To ask this question, you must be making a mistaken assumption: that typing speed was to be maximized. The real danger with early typewriters was that operators would hit successive keys too quickly, thereby crashing typebars into each other, bending connecting wires and so on. So the idea was to slow the operator down by making the most common letter sequences awkward to type.

Bernand: This is surely not right! These technological limitations have long since vanished, yet the keyboard is still as it was then.

Which one of the following, if true, could be used by Cora to counter Bernard’s rejection of her explanation?

(A) Typewriters and word-processing equipment are typically sold to people who have learned to use the standard keyboard and who, therefore, demand it in equipment they buy.
(B) Typewriters have been superseded in most offices by word-processing equipment, which has inherited the standard keyboard from typewriters.
(C) The standard keyboard allows skilled operators to achiever considerable typing speeds, thought it makes acquiring such skills relatively difficult.
(D) A person who has learned one keyboard layout can readily learn to use a second one in place of the first, but only with difficulty learn to use a second one alongside the first.
(E) It is now possible to construct typewriter and word-processing equipment in which a single keyboard can accommodate two or even more different keyboard layouts, each accessible to the operator at will.


I could not understand the highlighted part.


thanx guys. but OA is A.


Why is A better than B?
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2009, 01:58
I picked D to contradict the fact that the layout remained the same, but now I understand I am wrong.

I agree with A.

(A) Typewriters and word-processing equipment are typically sold to people who have learned to use the standard keyboard and who, therefore, demand it in equipment they buy.

We need to contradict the statement stating that layout be same as it is designed for better efficiency of the language. Contradiction by A: It is not because of the efficiency but the customer who are accustomed to the layout.

opinions?
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2009, 02:51
I agree that A is better than D but why cant we pick up (B).
Why should A be preferred over B
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2009, 09:52
shrutisingh wrote:
I agree that A is better than D but why cant we pick up (B).
Why should A be preferred over B


B is not contradicting bernand statment. It, I think, is mostly supporting(not too strongly but still)

As it says that typewriters has been replaced, it is supporting the statement "These technological limitations have long since vanished" by Bernard.
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2009, 07:41
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1) Bernand asks a question about typewriter design.
2) Cora answers by saying that a particular design was adopted because of technical limitations.
3) Bernand rejects the explanation saying that the technical limitations have seized to exist long before.

4) Now in order to counter this, Cora needs to either :
a) provide evidence that technical limitations still exist;
OR
b) provide a reason why the design has not been changed if she accepts the fact that limitations
have seized to exist.

Option A perfectly fits in the reasoning 4(b).
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Re: CR: Keyboard [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2009, 00:49
Yeah, should be A.
Re: CR: Keyboard   [#permalink] 23 Jul 2009, 00:49
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