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CR logic

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CR logic [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 09:59
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
Please provide explanations behind your answers.

If an act of civil disobedience—willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform—is done out of self-interest alone and not out of a concern for others, it cannot be justified. But one is justified in performing an act of civil disobedience if one’s conscience requires one to do so.

Which one of the following judgments most closely conforms to the principles stated above?
(A) Keisha’s protest against what she perceived to be a brutal and repressive dictatorship in another country was an act of justified civil disobedience, because in organizing an illegal but peaceful demonstration calling for a return to democratic leadership in that country, she acted purely out of concern for the people of that country.

(B) Janice’s protest against a law that forbade labor strikes was motivated solely by a desire to help local mine workers obtain fair wages. But her conscience did not require her to protest this law, so Janice didn’t perform an act of justified civil disobedience.

(C) In organizing an illegal protest against the practice in her country of having prison inmates work eighteen hours per day, Georgette performed an act of justified civil disobedience: though she acted out of concern for her fellow inmates rather than out of concern for herself.

(D) Maria’s deliberate violation of a law requiring prepublication government approval of all printed materials was an act of justified civil disobedience: though her interest as an owner of a publishing company would be served by repeal of the law, she violated the law because her conscience required doing so on behalf of all publishers.

(E) In organizing a parade of motorcyclists riding without helmets through the capital city, Louise’s act was not one of justified civil disobedience: she was willfully challenging a specific law requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets, but her conscience did not require her to organize the parade.
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Re: CR logic [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 10:12
buckkitty wrote:
Please provide explanations behind your answers.

If an act of civil disobedience—willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform—is done out of self-interest alone and not out of a concern for others, it cannot be justified. But one is justified in performing an act of civil disobedience if one’s conscience requires one to do so.

Which one of the following judgments most closely conforms to the principles stated above?
(A) Keisha’s protest against what she perceived to be a brutal and repressive dictatorship in another country was an act of justified civil disobedience, because in organizing an illegal but peaceful demonstration calling for a return to democratic leadership in that country, she acted purely out of concern for the people of that country.

(B) Janice’s protest against a law that forbade labor strikes was motivated solely by a desire to help local mine workers obtain fair wages. But her conscience did not require her to protest this law, so Janice didn’t perform an act of justified civil disobedience.

(C) In organizing an illegal protest against the practice in her country of having prison inmates work eighteen hours per day, Georgette performed an act of justified civil disobedience: though she acted out of concern for her fellow inmates rather than out of concern for herself.

(D) Maria’s deliberate violation of a law requiring prepublication government approval of all printed materials was an act of justified civil disobedience: though her interest as an owner of a publishing company would be served by repeal of the law, she violated the law because her conscience required doing so on behalf of all publishers.

(E) In organizing a parade of motorcyclists riding without helmets through the capital city, Louise’s act was not one of justified civil disobedience: she was willfully challenging a specific law requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets, but her conscience did not require her to organize the parade.


Good CR!

To conform to the argument, the anwer must establish that

1. A specific law was broken.
2. It was broken to bring about legal reform
3. Done not solely based on self-interest.
4. Required by one's conscience to do so.

The key to cracking this CR is to understand the following portion of the argument.

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform

IMHO, this indicates that a specific law must be broken to bring about legal reform of the law that is broken(in order to most closely conform to the argument).

Only D and E meet this criterion. E does not meet criterion no.4. So, I will stick my neck out and say D.
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Re: CR logic [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 12:25
ncprasad wrote:
buckkitty wrote:
Please provide explanations behind your answers.

If an act of civil disobedience—willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform—is done out of self-interest alone and not out of a concern for others, it cannot be justified. But one is justified in performing an act of civil disobedience if one’s conscience requires one to do so.

Which one of the following judgments most closely conforms to the principles stated above?
(A) Keisha’s protest against what she perceived to be a brutal and repressive dictatorship in another country was an act of justified civil disobedience, because in organizing an illegal but peaceful demonstration calling for a return to democratic leadership in that country, she acted purely out of concern for the people of that country.

(B) Janice’s protest against a law that forbade labor strikes was motivated solely by a desire to help local mine workers obtain fair wages. But her conscience did not require her to protest this law, so Janice didn’t perform an act of justified civil disobedience.

(C) In organizing an illegal protest against the practice in her country of having prison inmates work eighteen hours per day, Georgette performed an act of justified civil disobedience: though she acted out of concern for her fellow inmates rather than out of concern for herself.

(D) Maria’s deliberate violation of a law requiring prepublication government approval of all printed materials was an act of justified civil disobedience: though her interest as an owner of a publishing company would be served by repeal of the law, she violated the law because her conscience required doing so on behalf of all publishers.

(E) In organizing a parade of motorcyclists riding without helmets through the capital city, Louise’s act was not one of justified civil disobedience: she was willfully challenging a specific law requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets, but her conscience did not require her to organize the parade.


Good CR!

To conform to the argument, the anwer must establish that

1. A specific law was broken.
2. It was broken to bring about legal reform
3. Done not solely based on self-interest.
4. Required by one's conscience to do so.

The key to cracking this CR is to understand the following portion of the argument.

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform

IMHO, this indicates that a specific law must be broken to bring about legal reform of the law that is broken(in order to most closely conform to the argument).

Only D and E meet this criterion. E does not meet criterion no.4. So, I will stick my neck out and say D.


are you refuting B solely because it does not conform to:

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform
??

I saw the key to the question being the If x then y logic.

From the stem we only know:
If acting in self interest and not out of concern for others, then not justified
But,
If conscience requires it, then justified.

So, for instance we cannot deduce that:
If conscience does NOT require it, then NOT justified

And so on…
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 12:50
i will go with D) since that is the only one conforming to the logic in the question stem
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Re: CR logic [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 12:58
buckkitty wrote:
ncprasad wrote:
buckkitty wrote:
Please provide explanations behind your answers.

If an act of civil disobedience—willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform—is done out of self-interest alone and not out of a concern for others, it cannot be justified. But one is justified in performing an act of civil disobedience if one’s conscience requires one to do so.

Which one of the following judgments most closely conforms to the principles stated above?
(A) Keisha’s protest against what she perceived to be a brutal and repressive dictatorship in another country was an act of justified civil disobedience, because in organizing an illegal but peaceful demonstration calling for a return to democratic leadership in that country, she acted purely out of concern for the people of that country.

(B) Janice’s protest against a law that forbade labor strikes was motivated solely by a desire to help local mine workers obtain fair wages. But her conscience did not require her to protest this law, so Janice didn’t perform an act of justified civil disobedience.

(C) In organizing an illegal protest against the practice in her country of having prison inmates work eighteen hours per day, Georgette performed an act of justified civil disobedience: though she acted out of concern for her fellow inmates rather than out of concern for herself.

(D) Maria’s deliberate violation of a law requiring prepublication government approval of all printed materials was an act of justified civil disobedience: though her interest as an owner of a publishing company would be served by repeal of the law, she violated the law because her conscience required doing so on behalf of all publishers.

(E) In organizing a parade of motorcyclists riding without helmets through the capital city, Louise’s act was not one of justified civil disobedience: she was willfully challenging a specific law requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets, but her conscience did not require her to organize the parade.


Good CR!

To conform to the argument, the anwer must establish that

1. A specific law was broken.
2. It was broken to bring about legal reform
3. Done not solely based on self-interest.
4. Required by one's conscience to do so.

The key to cracking this CR is to understand the following portion of the argument.

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform

IMHO, this indicates that a specific law must be broken to bring about legal reform of the law that is broken(in order to most closely conform to the argument).

Only D and E meet this criterion. E does not meet criterion no.4. So, I will stick my neck out and say D.


are you refuting B solely because it does not conform to:

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform
??

I saw the key to the question being the If x then y logic.

From the stem we only know:
If acting in self interest and not out of concern for others, then not justified
But,
If conscience requires it, then justified.

So, for instance we cannot deduce that:
If conscience does NOT require it, then NOT justified

And so on…


I ruled out B primarily because, I dont think Janice's act can be classified as civil disobedience. B only says that Janice protested. We cannot be sure that she broke any laws.

I understand that the statement made in B is true. But the domain of the argument is restricted to civil disobedience.

For example, lets say 'If you write the GMAT, to get a score of 800, you need to get a raw score of 51 in Q and 51 in V'.

Lets examine another statement that says X did not write the GMAT. Does this mean he didn't get an 800. Of course, yes. But does this conform to the previous statement. No.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 13:52
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Re: CR logic [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2007, 22:20
ncprasad wrote:
buckkitty wrote:
ncprasad wrote:
buckkitty wrote:
Please provide explanations behind your answers.

If an act of civil disobedience—willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform—is done out of self-interest alone and not out of a concern for others, it cannot be justified. But one is justified in performing an act of civil disobedience if one’s conscience requires one to do so.

Which one of the following judgments most closely conforms to the principles stated above?
(A) Keisha’s protest against what she perceived to be a brutal and repressive dictatorship in another country was an act of justified civil disobedience, because in organizing an illegal but peaceful demonstration calling for a return to democratic leadership in that country, she acted purely out of concern for the people of that country.

(B) Janice’s protest against a law that forbade labor strikes was motivated solely by a desire to help local mine workers obtain fair wages. But her conscience did not require her to protest this law, so Janice didn’t perform an act of justified civil disobedience.

(C) In organizing an illegal protest against the practice in her country of having prison inmates work eighteen hours per day, Georgette performed an act of justified civil disobedience: though she acted out of concern for her fellow inmates rather than out of concern for herself.

(D) Maria’s deliberate violation of a law requiring prepublication government approval of all printed materials was an act of justified civil disobedience: though her interest as an owner of a publishing company would be served by repeal of the law, she violated the law because her conscience required doing so on behalf of all publishers.

(E) In organizing a parade of motorcyclists riding without helmets through the capital city, Louise’s act was not one of justified civil disobedience: she was willfully challenging a specific law requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets, but her conscience did not require her to organize the parade.


Good CR!

To conform to the argument, the anwer must establish that

1. A specific law was broken.
2. It was broken to bring about legal reform
3. Done not solely based on self-interest.
4. Required by one's conscience to do so.

The key to cracking this CR is to understand the following portion of the argument.

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform

IMHO, this indicates that a specific law must be broken to bring about legal reform of the law that is broken(in order to most closely conform to the argument).

Only D and E meet this criterion. E does not meet criterion no.4. So, I will stick my neck out and say D.


are you refuting B solely because it does not conform to:

willfully breaking a specific law in order to bring about legal reform
??

I saw the key to the question being the If x then y logic.

From the stem we only know:
If acting in self interest and not out of concern for others, then not justified
But,
If conscience requires it, then justified.

So, for instance we cannot deduce that:
If conscience does NOT require it, then NOT justified

And so on…


I ruled out B primarily because, I dont think Janice's act can be classified as civil disobedience. B only says that Janice protested. We cannot be sure that she broke any laws.

I understand that the statement made in B is true. But the domain of the argument is restricted to civil disobedience.

For example, lets say 'If you write the GMAT, to get a score of 800, you need to get a raw score of 51 in Q and 51 in V'.

Lets examine another statement that says X did not write the GMAT. Does this mean he didn't get an 800. Of course, yes. But does this conform to the previous statement. No.


NCR, I appreciate your patience and dedication.

Also in B, there is no self-interest element. That should be a part of civil disobedience.

My answer is D too.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2007, 10:41
Well done, OA is D.

ncprasad, thank you, as always, for taking the time to share your explanation.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2007, 13:34
buck, I just came back from the test. Would you believe it? I did not do particularly well in verbal. :cry:
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Feb 2007, 15:17
I'm surprised, definitely. 40 in verbal is a GREAT score though. But I know you are capable of better. You may have just had some back luck on the scoring, GMAT verbal is a beast, and scoring can be much more inconsistent than math, IMO. you should be really happy with the overall score- 740 is killer. If you're even thinking of re-taking, let that all sink in before deciding.

you'll always be a verbal 50 in my eyes buddy :wink:
  [#permalink] 19 Feb 2007, 15:17
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