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leadership at work example

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Senior Manager
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leadership at work example [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2007, 03:50
Which one is better for work leadership:

1) Heading market entry initiative into competitive and exclusive region, overcoming certain cultural and business obstacles in the process, emphasizing interpersonal skills and decision making skills (but not directly supervising anyone)

OR

2) training junior employees with a variety of techniques to better themselves?

Personally I prefer the first because its a more powerful accomplishment, but it doesn't show me supervising or "leading" anyone? What do you all think?

thanks.
Director
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2007, 04:00
id go with the first one too. leadership isnt just about managing people. it can entail when you:

identified/defined a problem
articulated vision
resisted conventional approaches; challenging status quo
convinced others of importance of problem
marshaled resources to address problem
motivated others
made good use of others' talents
was open to new information, input, etc.
built consensus with appropriate stakeholders
guided strong mid-course corrections; overcame mistakes
built on success
permanently upgraded organization’s capabilities; institutionalizing solution
illustrated methods for other individuals, organizations, etc.

(i got this from some adconsult site)

also, it is hard to substantiate the second one, whereas you have more solid facts to go on in the market entry example. i think it is definitely the more eye-catching and interesting one to use.
Senior Manager
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2007, 04:05
thanks dabots! good analysis.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2007, 07:19
I have recently come across this leadership example - you may find it interesting :-D

Quote:
"You could find evidence of my leadership as convenor of the Anarchist Club at Podunk College, or in raising over $1 million from Podunk students for the Tsunami Relief Fund.

"But honestly, the leadership experience I am most passionate about was the standardisation of paperclips at my work. For too long my employer had sufferred major financial losses from the inherent inefficiencies in people using different sizes and shapes of paperclips. So when I was promoted to Junior Assistant Office Manager, I implemented a policy of standardisation of paperclips on a single size and shape.

"This policy did encounter some resistance, and I had to fire 5 people after I observed non-regulation paperclips on their desks the day after the implementation of this policy. One particularly subversive employee tried to avoid responsibility by claiming that the non-complying paperclip had arrived in the mail that morning in a client's acceptance of a multi-million dollar contract, but I knew that my initiative would only succeed if I clearly communicated my expectations, and that allowing exceptions would undermine my authority. So I asserted this authority by firing her and withholding her redundnacy payout. However, I also treated this as a learning oppportunity, and subsequently drew up a "Incident Report of Receipt of Non-Conforming Paperclips" for use by employees.

"Although the office later closed due to the selfish resignations of a number of key employees and a reduced number of client contracts, I remain very proud of the tight and orderly ship that I ran at XYZ Industries in general. I feel that that the fact that there were no further incidents of non-conforming paperclips is clear endorsement of my enlightened and forward looking leadership style, and look forward to contributing these leadership skills to life at Wharton through the Wharton Diversity and Tolerance Committee."


just to cheer you up :P
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Re: leadership at work example [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2008, 22:04
awesome nick
Re: leadership at work example   [#permalink] 02 Jan 2008, 22:04
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