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Possible PhD Paradox

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New post 01 Jun 2007, 16:00
I will be starting an MS in Information Technologies in the fall. I am considering pursuing a PhD after that (although not necessarily immediately). It seems like most of the better MIS doctoral programs require more of a quantitative background than is typically required for MIS degrees at the bachelor's and master's levels.

It would be ridiculous to go back and get another bachelor's in math, but it almost seems like that's what a lot of schools want. Here's my question: is it at all possible to acquire this quant background through part-time or distance learning? Any relevant info (this would also apply to potential Accounting PhD's, I believe) is appreciated.
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New post 02 Jun 2007, 06:35
Yes, most MIS phd programs require some maths or econs background. If you can show that you have acquired the necessary background at a credible institution, I think it doesn't matter if it is full-time or part-time.
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New post 02 Jun 2007, 07:48
OK, now we're getting somewhere.

I'll start off by clarifying exactly where I stand. I have taken both micro- and macroeconomics, statistics, and I'm starting business calculus on Monday. However, it seems that the top PhD programs want at least linear algebra and multivariable calculus, which obviously require more courses than I have outlined.

It seems that online math programs (at least past the calculus series) are rare, but I actually managed to find one at U of Illinois-Springfield. Anybody here dealt with them? Would they meet your definition of a reputable school?

Also, I've seen Texas Tech mentioned a few times on this board. Has anyone here actually dealt with them directly? If so, what were your experiences? Would you recommend that program?
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New post 04 Jun 2007, 19:39
yellowrose wrote:
OK, now we're getting somewhere.

I'll start off by clarifying exactly where I stand. I have taken both micro- and macroeconomics, statistics, and I'm starting business calculus on Monday. However, it seems that the top PhD programs want at least linear algebra and multivariable calculus, which obviously require more courses than I have outlined.

It seems that online math programs (at least past the calculus series) are rare, but I actually managed to find one at U of Illinois-Springfield. Anybody here dealt with them? Would they meet your definition of a reputable school?

Also, I've seen Texas Tech mentioned a few times on this board. Has anyone here actually dealt with them directly? If so, what were your experiences? Would you recommend that program?


I'm starting my IS PhD this fall, so I can't tell you how much maths is required. However, I think finance and economics (and maybe accounting?) may need more high-level maths than other specializations.

From what I know regarding the IS phd that I'm going to do, I can choose between the economics or OB track - the former requires more demanding econs/maths background that the latter. However, I don't think the demands are as high/tough as those doing econs PhD.

You may want to check through the schools' websites or contact some existing IS PhD students to find out more.
  [#permalink] 04 Jun 2007, 19:39
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