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profile evaluation please

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profile evaluation please [#permalink] New post 07 May 2011, 19:22
Hi Alex,

Given your experience in the field I am hoping you can provide me with some guidance as to whether you believe I 'have what it takes' so to speak to get into one of the top business schools. At the moment I am focussing on Oxford Said Business School and INSEAD 1 year MBA programs.

I am hoping to sit the GMAT shortly. I believe I can realistically get a score around 680. However, do not plan to attend B-school until my work experience is further developed (perhaps 3 years time).

My background:

Education:

Bachelor of Business Administration Macquarie University (Australia) = 68% average. This is a terrible GPA and I am ashamed to mention it. However, I attribute this to immaturity. I am hoping the admission board will be able to see a development/growth.

Master of Commerce - The University of Sydney (Australia) = 80% average. Will there be higher emphasis placed on these results than my sub-optimal undergraduate results? I have heard otherwise and would like some clarification from someone as experienced as yourself. Admitted to Beta Gamma Sigma honour society as a result.

Career:

Current role - Graduate Program at Telstra - Operations (Australia). Telstra is the largest telecommunications provider in Australia.

I do not want to take up too much or your time so will leave it there. Actually, one other thing I possess both Australian citizenship and Greek citizenship. Is it true that applying from a certain region can assist your application. For instance, I heard that if you are applying from India with an IT background your chances are restricted due to simple supply and demand factors. Would like to hear your input in regards to this?

Hope to hear from you soon.
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Re: profile evaluation please [#permalink] New post 09 May 2011, 14:24
Applicants seem to overestimate the importance of one's passport when it comes to admissions.

If you're Greek but you've lived most of your life in Australia (you went to school there and work there), you'll be considered basically an Australian.

Nationality alone isn't what matters. Otherwise, every single applicant from Chad, Madagascar, and Bhutan will be admitted every year even if they were goat herders and shepherds.

Ultimately, it's about your professional experience. If you worked in a corporate job at a big company (like Telstra), your candidacy is more similar to folks who worked at say GE, O2, Siemens, etc. no matter which country they're from (or what part of the industrialized world they're from) because the nature of the job responsibilities are going to be similar.

What will be more of a concern is why you still want to go back for yet another related degree (MBA) after having gotten not just one, but two business degrees (BBA and a Master of Commerce). Aren't you sick of school already? Sooner or later, you have to stop going to school each time you want to switch jobs. As you hopefully know (or will know with time) - in business, it's still ultimately about real world experience. Collecting degrees can actually create more negative impressions for recruiters who may believe that you are too academic and not pragmatic/street smart enough.

Sounds like you have the start to a solid professional career, working at a large respected telecom. Focus on that for a few years, and then go from there. You probably won't feel the need to go back for another degree.
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Re: profile evaluation please [#permalink] New post 10 May 2011, 01:07
Hi Alex,

Wow, a lot to consider there. In Australia degrees from top business schools are very respected. Also, I believe an MBA from a top business school will assist me in forging a truly international career. I never believe you can be overstudied or overqualified - especially with different majors etc.

Thanks for your reply.

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Re: profile evaluation please [#permalink] New post 10 May 2011, 21:19
40727610 wrote:
Hi Alex,

Wow, a lot to consider there. In Australia degrees from top business schools are very respected. Also, I believe an MBA from a top business school will assist me in forging a truly international career. I never believe you can be overstudied or overqualified - especially with different majors etc.

Thanks for your reply.

Alex


Yes, learning is a lifelong process, but there is a danger in being perceived as a credentials collector, or a boy scout who collects degrees. Because it can suggest that you're too academically minded and not street smart enough.

It's your life, but just be aware of the fact that businesses may actually take you less seriously if you're spending more of your time collecting degrees than gaining real world experience. Beyond a certain point (and in most cases it's after your first masters degree), people tend to value your work experience way more than your formal education.

If you've spent most of your life in school and have little work experience, I can see how you may feel that getting more degrees is valuable. But when you have a few years more of work experience under your belt, you will likely think otherwise.
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Re: profile evaluation please   [#permalink] 10 May 2011, 21:19
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