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Question Two - Identify Assumption, Argument, Etc.

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Eternal Intern
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Question Two - Identify Assumption, Argument, Etc. [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2003, 21:51
A certain species of bird has two basic varieties, crested and noncrested. The birds, which generally live in flocks that contain only crested or only noncrested birds, tend to select mates of the same variety as themselves. However, if a bird that is raised in a flock in which all other members are crested is later moved to a mixed flock, then that bird - whether crested or noncrested- is likely to select a crested mate. This fact indicates that the birds' preference for crested or noncrested mates is learned rather than genetically determined.

E) If a bird of the species is raised in a flock that contains both crested and noncrested birds, that bird shows no preference for one variety or the other in its selection of a mate.

Why is that right in supporting the argument?
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Question Two - Identify Assumption, Argument, Etc. [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2003, 22:56
The birds' choice of mate could be based on one of two reasons

1) Genetically built-in
2) Learnt in its flock where it grows up

If birds raised in a mixed flock were to show preference for crested or non-crested, then one could draw a conclusion that the choice is genetically determined.

But if E is true, i.e., "if a bird of the species is raised in a flock that contains both crested and noncrested birds, that bird shows no preference for one variety or the other in its selection of a mate", then this proves that the choice is learnt in the flock where it grows up

Therefore, E supports the argument
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Is this genetically determined? [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2003, 11:30
The birds, which generally live in flocks that contain only crested or only noncrested birds, tend to select mates of the same variety as themselves.

This could be learned genetically or learned from, right?
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Re: Is this genetically determined? [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2003, 20:44
Curly05 wrote:
The birds, which generally live in flocks that contain only crested or only noncrested birds, tend to select mates of the same variety as themselves.

This could be learned genetically or learned from, right?


Curly,

In a pure flock, the stimulus for choosing the mate could be genetic or socially learnt. The test is when the bird is raised in a mixed flock chooses a mate.

Lets assume our test case is a crested bird. Now this bird chooses a crested mate when it is raised in a pure crested flock. If this bird always chooses a crested mate even when it is raised in a mixed flock, then we can conclude that the choice is genetic. But according to the passage, there is no pattern in the choice when the bird is raised in a mixed flock. Therefore, we conclude that the choice is socially learnt in the flock.
Re: Is this genetically determined?   [#permalink] 30 Jun 2003, 20:44
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Question Two - Identify Assumption, Argument, Etc.

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