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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans

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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans [#permalink] New post 20 Feb 2009, 21:24
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The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 20 Feb 2009, 23:03
reply2spg wrote:
The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.

Don't have OA for this


(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2009, 14:14
IMO C.

Argument depends on statment that "basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate". Though some poor and some rich are uncounted. It can only happen while percentages of both are same. That's what assumed in C. D is wrong because number may not be same.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2009, 17:59
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
IMO C.

Argument depends on statment that "basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate". Though some poor and some rich are uncounted. It can only happen while percentages of both are same. That's what assumed in C. D is wrong because number may not be same.



MO is opposite, C is wrong cuz percentage of both are same, which doesn't mean the number of uncounted rich is as many as that of uncounted poor. For example, 1/4 = 1000/4000. D is likely correct cuz the number of rich is equal to that of poor so that some of rich is somehow equal to some of poor.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2009, 19:04
reply2spg wrote:
The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.

Don't have OA for this


D is incorrect because the conclusion is about poor people (including the homeless) but D only specifies the homeless.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 22 Feb 2009, 12:09
reply2spg wrote:
what is wrong with B?


Actually I chose B

If all Americans cannot be reasonably classified as R/P, the conclusion of basic statistical portrait is not accurate any more along with non perfect numbers because the census missed one piece of the big portrait/picture.

Think Middle class, which is unaccounted for in the argument.

To me, C is wrong because percentages and numbers are different.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 22 Feb 2009, 21:56
I vote B.
The assumption is that 'no middle class person' is left behind. :lol:
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2009, 12:25
IMO C.

B is an assumption for C,which in turn is the required assumption for the argument,which talks abt the 'the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate'. To explain this, the next line is the reasoning 'Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.'

But this reasoning depends on the the assumption C.

Please correct if i am wrong.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2009, 14:50
WhyabloodyMBA wrote:
IMO C.

B is an assumption for C,which in turn is the required assumption for the argument,which talks abt the 'the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate'. To explain this, the next line is the reasoning 'Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.'

But this reasoning depends on the the assumption C.

Please correct if i am wrong.


By selecting C you are proving that population count is right while selecting we are proving that basic model is correct there are no left outs. Therefore, answer has to be B.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2009, 22:48
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My take is that B cud also have been a valid assumption,

But in the context of argument which talks about about the poor and rich people, the assumption shud be close to it.

in gMAT, its the matter of which is more correct rather than being absolutely correct.

My answer is C.

number of poor people = 150 ( acutally)

ppl counted = 120 missed = 30

number of rich people = 100
ppl counted = 80 missed = 20

actual health of nation = 150/100 = 3/2
counted health of nation = 120/80 = 3/2

census is same only when the percentage of missed people in both rich and poor categories is same..
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2009, 05:17
Neochronic wrote:
My take is that B cud also have been a valid assumption,

But in the context of argument which talks about about the poor and rich people, the assumption shud be close to it.

in gMAT, its the matter of which is more correct rather than being absolutely correct.

My answer is C.

number of poor people = 150 ( acutally)

ppl counted = 120 missed = 30

number of rich people = 100
ppl counted = 80 missed = 20

actual health of nation = 150/100 = 3/2
counted health of nation = 120/80 = 3/2

census is same only when the percentage of missed people in both rich and poor categories is same..


Look at the statement that says thousands of people remain uncounted.
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2009, 06:09
I vote for A because it support for 2 premises above.

So what is OA?
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Re: CR: Census [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2009, 11:07
C it is.

Census should be in proportion to the population (represent the population)

Population = 20% A + 30% B + 50% C
if lets assume 10% of each not counted (not number)
then it'll still represent the potrait of the nation with the ratio of popualtion 2:3:5

but if the equal number of each group are not counted ==> it'll distort the portrait of the nation.
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2009, 00:14
lagomez wrote:
papillon86 wrote:
19. The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted. However, the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate. Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless; but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?
(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich.
(C) The percentage of poor Americans uncounted by the census is close to the percentage of rich Americans uncounted.
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.


I'll go with C


I like C too.

I didn't like B because the main point needed is to know whether the sample is representative of the population. Even if people are correctly classified, we still do not know if the sampling is accurate
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2009, 18:41
This was a real tough one, and I might be overthinking it but ill give it a shot:

I was for C before I tried to explain my reasoning

Now I believe its D

Premise 1: Some Poor arent counted, particularly the homeless
Premise 2: Some Rich arent counted because they are often traveling

Assumption 1: You need to be home to counted
Assumption 2: The homeless arent counted because they dont have a home, the rich arent counted because they often arent at home
Assumption 3: The number of homeless is approximately the number of rich

Conclusion: Net effect on the census is zero

Am i assuming too much?

What is the OA?
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 14 Dec 2009, 04:42
The oa seems to be C. I'd mistakenly chose E for this question, later tried it again and as it is assumption question... with negation
Premise: US census not perfect, thousands go uncounted
Premise: Some poor go uncounted, But some of the rich go uncounted as well
Conclusion: Basic statistical portrait is accurate

negate C) %age of poor uncounted is NOT close to %age of rich uncounted
This will affect the conclusion and basic statistical portrait is not accurate.
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2009, 22:42
gddunton wrote:
This was a real tough one, and I might be overthinking it but ill give it a shot:

I was for C before I tried to explain my reasoning

Now I believe its D

Premise 1: Some Poor arent counted, particularly the homeless
Premise 2: Some Rich arent counted because they are often traveling

Assumption 1: You need to be home to counted
Assumption 2: The homeless arent counted because they dont have a home, the rich arent counted because they often arent at home
Assumption 3: The number of homeless is approximately the number of rich who often travel

Conclusion: Net effect on the census is zero

Am i assuming too much?

What is the OA?


I do not think so.
but you miss one information: "Rich people" is different from "rich people who often travel (until left uncount)".

(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.-->in D, Homeless American=Rich American (wrong). There are some rich people who stay home.

To correct the (D): The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americanswho often travel (Now it can be the assumption. However, this corrected D means the same thing as C. does).
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 22 Dec 2009, 06:04
I think its B .....

Applying the negation test ...if u apply negation test to B ...the argument falls apart since if there are more than 2 representative groups then the argument does not hold...et all...

WHats the OA ..
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 22 Dec 2009, 06:55
I will go with C as it correctly points out the reason for statistical balance in results.
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!! [#permalink] New post 22 Dec 2009, 09:44
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Fact1:The U.S. census is not perfect: thousands of Americans probably go uncounted.
Fact2:Certainly some of the poor go uncounted, particularly the homeless;
Fact3:but some of the rich go uncounted as well, because they are often abroad or traveling between one residence and another.
Conclusion:the basic statistical portrait of the nation painted by the census is accurate.

Paraphrased Assumption: The number of uncounted poor people = number of uncounted rich people.

Skim through the answer choices
C seems to be the closest.

Non necessary for getting to the answer but I will also examine why the other choices are wrong -
(A) Both the rich and the poor have personal and economic reasons to avoid being counted by the census. Out of Scope.
(B) All Americans may reasonably be classified as either poor or rich. Comes close but vague
(D) The number of homeless Americans is approximately equal to the number of rich Americans.We don't care how many are rich or poor we only care how many of those are unaccounted for
(E) The primary purpose of the census is to analyze the economic status of the American population.Probably an inference not an assumption but a very very close one since we are sort of assuming that Census is not merely counting people but it's counting people based on their economic status.
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Re: Got this one wrong....Plz help!!!!!   [#permalink] 22 Dec 2009, 09:44
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