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m05#06

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m05#06 [#permalink] New post 14 Oct 2008, 18:08
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What is the product of 6 consecutive integers?

1. The greatest integer is 4
2. The sequence has both positive and negative integers

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
D

Source: GMAT Club Tests - hardest GMAT questions

The explanation for S1 indicates that all integers are knowable (The greatest integer is 4).

S2 indicates that "the sequence has both positive and negative integers" therefore zero is included and the product will be zero.

Nothing is incorrect with the explanation, but S1 would also be sufficient by dint of zero also being included in the sequence. Or at least that's what I take consecutive to mean.

I only mention this because it's another way to prosecute S1, although I admit knowing I could crank out the product concretely was the first reason I discounted S1.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2010, 05:27
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ykaiim wrote:
See we can have a three different consecutive series:
1. Simple consecutive, with difference 1.
2. Consecutive odd (Example, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7), and
3. Consecutive even (Example, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)

S2 says that "the sequence has both positive and negative integers". It is not mentioned what type of consecutives the sequesnce is. So, it is not neccasary and correct to choose the (1) one.


dzyubam wrote:
The sequence contains both even and odd integers. How would you specify that both odd and even integers are in the sequence? I thought it goes without saying if not stated otherwise. Any suggestions? Thanks.
ykaiim wrote:
I have a doubt.

In S2, It is not mentioned that the series is of consecutive odd or even numbers:
-4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6
-3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7

Both the above sequences are of consecutive numbers (even/odd) but having different products. So, I think OA should be A.


When we see "consecutive integers" it ALWAYS means integers that follow each other in order with common difference of 1: ... x-3, x-2, x-1, x, x+1, x+2, ... (no such thing as simple consecutive integers).

-7, -6, -5 are consecutive integers.

2, 4, 6 ARE NOT consecutive integers, they are consecutive even integers.

3, 5, 7 ARE NOT consecutive integers, they are consecutive odd integers.

Hope it helps.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2010, 00:18
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321kumarsushant wrote:
What is the product of 6 consecutive integers?

1. The greatest integer is 4
2. The sequence has both positive and negative integers

My Sol:
the product of 6 integer is 0.
stmnt 1: it tells that nos are -1,0,1,2,3,4(from the definition of Integer.)

(An integer is a whole number (not a fraction) that can be positive, negative, or zero. Therefore, the numbers 10, 0, -25, and 5,148 are all integers. )

multiply them , you will 0 as Ans.

Stmnt 2: it tells nothing but def of integer.

so, statement 1 is sufficient alone to answer the question.
and Answer is 0.


Ok, here's the deal: As soon as S1 gives you the answer, you do NOT rush to click 'A'. You analyse S2 as well, and if S2 does not provide the answer too, you click 'A', else you click 'D' (please note that S1 has given an answer already so B,C and E are out of question).

Now, we know S1 gives us the answer (0).
Lets analyze S2 now. "The sequence (of 6 consecutive integers) has both positive and negative integers". So the sequence could be one of the following four:
{-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1}, {-3,-2,-1,0,1,2}, {-2,-1,0,1,2,3}, {-1,0,1,2,3,4}
'0' is always present hence product is always 0. Good, S2 gives us an answer too. Lets click 'D' now.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 03:44
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The sequence contains both even and odd integers. How would you specify that both odd and even integers are in the sequence? I thought it goes without saying if not stated otherwise. Any suggestions? Thanks.
ykaiim wrote:
I have a doubt.

In S2, It is not mentioned that the series is of consecutive odd or even numbers:
-4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6
-3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7

Both the above sequences are of consecutive numbers (even/odd) but having different products. So, I think OA should be A.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2010, 14:51
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scorcho wrote:
What is the product of 6 consecutive integers?

1. The greatest integer is 4
2. The sequence has both positive and negative integers

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
D

Source: GMAT Club Tests - hardest GMAT questions

The explanation for S1 indicates that all integers are knowable (The greatest integer is 4).

S2 indicates that "the sequence has both positive and negative integers" therefore zero is included and the product will be zero.

Nothing is incorrect with the explanation, but S1 would also be sufficient by dint of zero also being included in the sequence. Or at least that's what I take consecutive to mean.

I only mention this because it's another way to prosecute S1, although I admit knowing I could crank out the product concretely was the first reason I discounted S1.


Be wary when consecutive integers cross 0.

Statement 1) says 4 is the greatest integer so the sequence will look like this
-1,0,1,2,3,4 (the product of these consecutive numbers is 0) SUFFICIENT

Statement 2) If the consecutive numbers have positive and negative numbers then it MUST cross 0. This will also yield 0 all the time. SUFFICIENT
ex: -1,0,1,2,3,4
ex 2: -2,-1,0,1,2,3


D is the answer.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 12 Dec 2010, 18:34
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As 0 will be included in both the options...

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2008, 08:09
Sorry, I couldn't understand your point. Do you suggest that we state in the explanation for S1 that 0 will be one of the numbers.

Thanks.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 23 May 2010, 08:13
I have a doubt.

In S2, It is not mentioned that the series is of consecutive odd or even numbers:
-4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6
-3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7

Both the above sequences are of consecutive numbers (even/odd) but having different products. So, I think OA should be A.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 24 May 2010, 04:01
See we can have a three different consecutive series:
1. Simple consecutive, with difference 1.
2. Consecutive odd (Example, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7), and
3. Consecutive even (Example, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6)

S2 says that "the sequence has both positive and negative integers". It is not mentioned what type of consecutives the sequesnce is. So, it is not neccasary and correct to choose the (1) one.


dzyubam wrote:
The sequence contains both even and odd integers. How would you specify that both odd and even integers are in the sequence? I thought it goes without saying if not stated otherwise. Any suggestions? Thanks.
ykaiim wrote:
I have a doubt.

In S2, It is not mentioned that the series is of consecutive odd or even numbers:
-4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6
-3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7

Both the above sequences are of consecutive numbers (even/odd) but having different products. So, I think OA should be A.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 28 May 2010, 09:47
No reply yet :(

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2010, 05:30
Bunuel,

Do you mean to say, unless clearl y mentioned what type of consecutives number, we need to consider the immediate consecutive numbers -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4.....?

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2010, 05:42
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ykaiim wrote:
Bunuel,

Do you mean to say, unless clearl y mentioned what type of consecutives number, we need to consider the immediate consecutive numbers -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4.....?


Yes. "Consecutive integers", unless otherwise specified, means integers that follow each other in order with common difference of 1.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2010, 07:07
Thanks Bunuel. This is useful concept.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2010, 17:59
rmangal wrote:
A

rmangal... that's incorrect!!! :oops:
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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2010, 20:09
I would go with A. As explained earlier option 1 seems to include all information that is required. Option 2 just gives a small set of information which is already available in 1.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2010, 20:14
So I am wrong, looking at the OA. Did not consider that option 2 also states that there is 0 as one of the numbers. I think I was trying to be fast/furious :). Arrived at the first answer within 30s and hence missed some details.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2010, 22:34
What is the product of 6 consecutive integers?

1. The greatest integer is 4
2. The sequence has both positive and negative integers

My Sol:
the product of 6 integer is 0.
stmnt 1: it tells that nos are -1,0,1,2,3,4(from the definition of Integer.)

(An integer is a whole number (not a fraction) that can be positive, negative, or zero. Therefore, the numbers 10, 0, -25, and 5,148 are all integers. )

multiply them , you will 0 as Ans.

Stmnt 2: it tells nothing but def of integer.

so, statement 1 is sufficient alone to answer the question.
and Answer is 0.

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2010, 01:18
vaibhavtripathi wrote:
321kumarsushant wrote:
What is the product of 6 consecutive integers?

1. The greatest integer is 4
2. The sequence has both positive and negative integers

My Sol:
the product of 6 integer is 0.
stmnt 1: it tells that nos are -1,0,1,2,3,4(from the definition of Integer.)

(An integer is a whole number (not a fraction) that can be positive, negative, or zero. Therefore, the numbers 10, 0, -25, and 5,148 are all integers. )

multiply them , you will 0 as Ans.

Stmnt 2: it tells nothing but def of integer.

so, statement 1 is sufficient alone to answer the question.
and Answer is 0.


Ok, here's the deal: As soon as S1 gives you the answer, you do NOT rush to click 'A'. You analyse S2 as well, and if S2 does not provide the answer too, you click 'A', else you click 'D' (please note that S1 has given an answer already so B,C and E are out of question).

Now, we know S1 gives us the answer (0).
Lets analyze S2 now. "The sequence (of 6 consecutive integers) has both positive and negative integers". So the sequence could be one of the following four:
{-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1}, {-3,-2,-1,0,1,2}, {-2,-1,0,1,2,3}, {-1,0,1,2,3,4}
'0' is always present hence product is always 0. Good, S2 gives us an answer too. Lets click 'D' now.



hey vaibhav,

such a nice explanation.
i was about to reply you back, but then only i realize .. what you have said is right.
thnx a ton.

both statement can answer the question alone.
and the ultimate answer will be 0(Zero.)

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2010, 04:02
Glad I could help. :)

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Re: m05#06 [#permalink] New post 13 Nov 2010, 11:00
statement 2 only says 'The sequence has both positive and negative integers' n doesnt speak where it starts n ends. eg {1,2,3,4,5,6} can also be valid
IMO A


vaibhavtripathi wrote:
321kumarsushant wrote:
What is the product of 6 consecutive integers?

1. The greatest integer is 4
2. The sequence has both positive and negative integers

My Sol:
the product of 6 integer is 0.
stmnt 1: it tells that nos are -1,0,1,2,3,4(from the definition of Integer.)

(An integer is a whole number (not a fraction) that can be positive, negative, or zero. Therefore, the numbers 10, 0, -25, and 5,148 are all integers. )

multiply them , you will 0 as Ans.

Stmnt 2: it tells nothing but def of integer.

so, statement 1 is sufficient alone to answer the question.
and Answer is 0.


Ok, here's the deal: As soon as S1 gives you the answer, you do NOT rush to click 'A'. You analyse S2 as well, and if S2 does not provide the answer too, you click 'A', else you click 'D' (please note that S1 has given an answer already so B,C and E are out of question).

Now, we know S1 gives us the answer (0).
Lets analyze S2 now. "The sequence (of 6 consecutive integers) has both positive and negative integers". So the sequence could be one of the following four:
{-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1}, {-3,-2,-1,0,1,2}, {-2,-1,0,1,2,3}, {-1,0,1,2,3,4}
'0' is always present hence product is always 0. Good, S2 gives us an answer too. Lets click 'D' now.
Re: m05#06   [#permalink] 13 Nov 2010, 11:00
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