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LIKE vs AS Usage

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LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2009, 11:46
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Hi

I always have confusion on when to use 'like' and when to use 'AS'. Any help is much appreciated.

example. this question confused me a lot

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in
(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in
(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in
(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms
(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2009, 17:08
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Like is used to compare only nouns. (i.e. use like to say two things are similar, and let the clause that follows tell how they are similar)
The earth, like other planets, spins on an axis.
Like other planets, the earth spins on an axis.


As is used to compare clauses. (i.e. use as if two actions are similar)
A globe spins around an axis, as does the Earth itself.

A few rules of thumb:
(1) you should have two verbs in a sentence with an As comparison, one verb in a sentence with a Like comparison.
(2) Like comparisons work the same way as noun modifiers--make sure the right nouns are touching!
(3) The GMAT tends to use like mostly at the beginning of sentences. It is tough to put like at the end of a sentence and get the meaning right.

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater ...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a spinning figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = the increased speed. Should be Earth = skater.

(C) like a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(D) just as a spinning figure skater (modifier: who increases speed by drawing in her arms)...AS incorrectly compares nouns. There is no verb in the as phrase, as required.

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms. CORRECT. AS correctly compares the verbs speed up and increases speed.
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2009, 19:07
I believe it is a "SHE". :)
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2009, 19:32
mrsmarthi wrote:
I believe it is a "SHE". :)



anyways....she is ' the man'....
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2009, 11:55
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I'm not picky--as long as you all are happy you can call me "man" anytime.
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2009, 11:38
ISBtarget wrote:
esledge wrote:
Like is used to compare only nouns. (i.e. use like to say two things are similar, and let the clause that follows tell how they are similar)
The earth, like other planets, spins on an axis.
Like other planets, the earth spins on an axis.


As is used to compare clauses. (i.e. use as if two actions are similar)
A globe spins around an axis, as does the Earth itself.

A few rules of thumb:
(1) you should have two verbs in a sentence with an As comparison, one verb in a sentence with a Like comparison.
(2) Like comparisons work the same way as noun modifiers--make sure the right nouns are touching!
(3) The GMAT tends to use like mostly at the beginning of sentences. It is tough to put like at the end of a sentence and get the meaning right.

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater ...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a spinning figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = the increased speed. Should be Earth = skater.

(C) like a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(D) just as a spinning figure skater (modifier: who increases speed by drawing in her arms)...AS incorrectly compares nouns. There is no verb in the as phrase, as required.

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms. CORRECT. AS correctly compares the verbs speed up and increases speed.


beautiful man....great


"just as a spinning figure skater (modifier: who increases speed by drawing in her arms)...AS incorrectly compares nouns. There is no verb in the as phrase, as required."

I agree with esledge - who refers to the figure skater and not her action of rotation(which is what we need to compare).
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 30 Oct 2009, 04:47
Like cannot introduce a standalone sentence with a verb!

Therefore chose between D/E.
If you want to compare the same things and keep parallelism, you will have to chose E

E is the correct answer
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 30 Oct 2009, 18:58
Hi esledge,

Elegant and detailed explanations. Thanks, I really enjoy reading your posts.

One specific and practical question: I am an online student at MGMAT and looking for a private tutor. (Online, as I'm international). I want a private tutoring especially for the verbal, as I am not a native English speaker. On top of that I learnt my English in England! Oh dear.

Do you do private tutoring as well? If yes, I'm very much interested to discuss further.

Thanks.
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 18 Feb 2011, 22:08
E!

Love the explanation- i learnt it in the Manhattan gmat textbook too
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2012, 00:32
Expert's post
esledge wrote:
Like is used to compare only nouns. (i.e. use like to say two things are similar, and let the clause that follows tell how they are similar)
The earth, like other planets, spins on an axis.
Like other planets, the earth spins on an axis.


As is used to compare clauses. (i.e. use as if two actions are similar)
A globe spins around an axis, as does the Earth itself.

A few rules of thumb:
(1) you should have two verbs in a sentence with an As comparison, one verb in a sentence with a Like comparison.
(2) Like comparisons work the same way as noun modifiers--make sure the right nouns are touching!
(3) The GMAT tends to use like mostly at the beginning of sentences. It is tough to put like at the end of a sentence and get the meaning right.

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater ...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a spinning figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = the increased speed. Should be Earth = skater.

(C) like a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(D) just as a spinning figure skater (modifier: who increases speed by drawing in her arms)...AS incorrectly compares nouns. There is no verb in the as phrase, as required.

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms. CORRECT. AS correctly compares the verbs speed up and increases speed.



Very well explained 'esledge'...Thanks..however i got it correct before going through your explanations... :)
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 13 Apr 2013, 11:03
esledge wrote:
Like is used to compare only nouns. (i.e. use like to say two things are similar, and let the clause that follows tell how they are similar)
The earth, like other planets, spins on an axis.
Like other planets, the earth spins on an axis.


As is used to compare clauses. (i.e. use as if two actions are similar)
A globe spins around an axis, as does the Earth itself.

A few rules of thumb:
(1) you should have two verbs in a sentence with an As comparison, one verb in a sentence with a Like comparison.
(2) Like comparisons work the same way as noun modifiers--make sure the right nouns are touching!
(3) The GMAT tends to use like mostly at the beginning of sentences. It is tough to put like at the end of a sentence and get the meaning right.

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater ...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a spinning figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = the increased speed. Should be Earth = skater.

(C) like a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(D) just as a spinning figure skater (modifier: who increases speed by drawing in her arms)...AS incorrectly compares nouns. There is no verb in the as phrase, as required.

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms. CORRECT. AS correctly compares the verbs speed up and increases speed.


Is rotation not considered a noun in this example?
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Re: lIKE vs AS [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2013, 15:43
esledge wrote:
Like is used to compare only nouns. (i.e. use like to say two things are similar, and let the clause that follows tell how they are similar)
The earth, like other planets, spins on an axis.
Like other planets, the earth spins on an axis.


As is used to compare clauses. (i.e. use as if two actions are similar)
A globe spins around an axis, as does the Earth itself.

A few rules of thumb:
(1) you should have two verbs in a sentence with an As comparison, one verb in a sentence with a Like comparison.
(2) Like comparisons work the same way as noun modifiers--make sure the right nouns are touching!
(3) The GMAT tends to use like mostly at the beginning of sentences. It is tough to put like at the end of a sentence and get the meaning right.

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater ...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a spinning figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = the increased speed. Should be Earth = skater.

(C) like a figure skater...LIKE compares nouns, but the comparison is Earth's rotation = a figure skater. Should be Earth = skater.

(D) just as a spinning figure skater (modifier: who increases speed by drawing in her arms)...AS incorrectly compares nouns. There is no verb in the as phrase, as required.

(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms. CORRECT. AS correctly compares the verbs speed up and increases speed.



I have a question on the usage of like. I know that like is used to compare nouns but never a clause. Today I was going through OG 13 question 37. The question has used like to compare phrases. OG explanation says that this usage is correct. Can you please throw some light on this. Are there any other comparison element that can be used besides noun and phrases.
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 10 May 2014, 13:28
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 10 May 2014, 20:53
ISBtarget wrote:
Hi

I always have confusion on when to use 'like' and when to use 'AS'. Any help is much appreciated.

example. this question confused me a lot

During an ice age, the buildup of ice at the poles and the drop in water levels near the equator speed up the Earth’s rotation, like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in.

(A) like a spinning figure skater whose speed increases when her arms are drawn in
(B) like the increased speed of a figure skater when her arms are drawn in
(C) like a figure skater who increases speed while spinning with her arms drawn in
(D) just as a spinning figure skater who increases speed by drawing in her arms
(E) just as a spinning figure skater increases speed by drawing in her arms


this question is not from og or gmatprep. However, it is a nice question
as/like is important topic on sc. I will not say the grammatical fuctions of there words. "like" is used before a noun/noun phrase and "as" before a clause

I will focus on meaning/logic fuctions of these words and these meaning fuctions are a focus of sc. sc test us the meaning/logic relations between entities in the sentence. testing this way, gmat make us write logically. this kink of wirten I call, logic writen english.

"like" is used to say that two noun are similar in that these two now do the same action

like the stone, I stay still

"as" is used to say that two actions are done in the same way.

I learn english as you learn vietnamese.

these meaning fuctions of like/as tell us how to find errors in the sentence. in short, we have to consider meaning to solve sc problem. non native speaker, with the shalow understanding of the meaning, will find hard to solve sc. the native speaker , by understanding the meaning better and naturally, will sovle sc easily. e-gmat initiating the thinking of focus on meaning is a good course.

choice A.

focus on meaning, not on grammatical rule,
the buld up and drop increase speed of earth, like the skater.

grammatically, this sentence is correct. but, considering meaning, this sentence is not logic. "skater" and the "buld up and drop" can not do the same thing, "increase speed of earth". the "skater" can not inrease the spead of earth.

C is similar to A

B.
"increased speed " can not increase the speed of earth and so can not be similar to the "buld up and drop" in that they increase earth's speed.

D.
this is not relevant much to like/as usage. we need "do" to make the second part a clause. moreover, meaning is distorted. this topic of distorted meaning should be discussed latter because it is a big topic.

the explanation of meaning fuction of like/as is not full previously, this problem making us hard to understand and use like/as. I hope my explanation is more detail and helpfull to you.

pls give kudos if you like this explanation.
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 10 May 2014, 21:03
"like" at the end of sentence and without a comma is similar to "as". one og question prove this rule

I teach gmat like you= I teach english as you do ( my teaching and your teaching is in the same way)

I teach gmat, like you= like you, I teach gmat ( I and you are the same in that we do teaching)

a clear undersanding the meaning fuction of each entity in the sentence is key to success on sc. grammatical fuctions of entities in the sentence are explained in grammar books, but meaning fuctions are not.

when learning sc, we should find out the meaning/logic fuctions of entities. to do so, of course, we have to find out the grammatical fuctions of the entities. finding out the meaing fuctions of the entities is easy because grammar books said these fuction a lot.

ask ourself, dose this meaning fuction of this entity is logic ?
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Re: LIKE vs AS Usage [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2014, 13:02
Hello esledge,

I also figured out that the answer is 'E', when i attempted this question. But my reasoning was different. I actually dont understand how your reasoning makes sense. I think, the subject of the first clause in the question is ''the buildup of ice '' and "the drop in water levels"... These two form the subject and they are being compared to the "spinning figure skater" in options A,C and D and this comparison does not make sense. So options A,C,D eliminate. In option B, the subject is compared to "increased speed", and this also does not make sense.Eliminate B.

Option E however compares the actions in both the clauses and so it is correct.

In your reasoning, you are eliminating the answers by comparing "Earth's rotation" with "a figure skater". How can you compare these two as "Earth's rotation" is not the subject of the first clause...?

Kindly explain.. Thank you
Re: LIKE vs AS Usage   [#permalink] 15 Aug 2014, 13:02
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