Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 15 Sep 2014, 02:15

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Anyone Vs. Those

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2007
Posts: 183
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2007, 23:01
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
After July, anyone disposing of or servicing refrigerators must capture the chlorofluorocarbons in the refrigerant chemicals.

(A) anyone disposing of or servicing

(B) those who dispose or service

(C) anyone disposing of or who services

(D) the disposal or repair of

(E) someone who disposes or repairs

Please Explain.

Thanks.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 205 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 01:28
ok, I would say B and I'll explain why. When you look at the un-underlined text, you'll see the verb "capture." This verb is in plural form, therefore you have to eliminate answer choices that display their subjects in singular form and have to keep those that have their subjects in plural form:

a) "anyone" is singular
b) "those who dispose and service." Those is plural followed by 2 verbs in their plural forms
c) "anyone" is singular
d) "the disposal" or "repair of" are singular
e) "someone" is singular


hope this helps
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 205 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 01:35
let me add something else just to be clear with something here:

1) This: Is a singular form that refers to a thing that is close to you

2) These: Is a plural form that referes to things that ARE close to you

3) That: Is a singular form that refers to a thing that is far away or at least more distant than "this."

4) Those: Is a plural form that refers to things that ARE far away or at least more distant than "these."

hope this helps
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Jun 2007
Posts: 157
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 02:33
(A) anyone disposing of or servicing
(B) those who dispose or service
(C) anyone disposing of or who services
(D) the disposal or repair of
(E) someone who disposes or repairs

I think this is a question about an idiom - you can dispose of something, you can't dispose something. This rules out B, D and E.

C is wrong because of mixed up tenses

Answer should be A.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 205 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 03:03
Don't forget, this sentence is using a restrictive clause, meaning that it's not talking about ALL people. It is talking about certain people who dispose or service refrigerators. There are 2 ways that you can introduce a restrictive clause:

1) By using a relative pronoun such as who, but WITHOUT using a comma

first example: James who lives in Canada.
meaning: There is more than 1 james, and i'm trying to specify which james.

second example: James, who lives in Canada.
meaning: There is only 1 james that I could be talking about, and I'm just adding some extra information about him. That extra information will not change any meaning to james because we all already know which james without that extra information

2) By using a present participle WITHOUT using a comma

first example: Students studying for the exam will pass.
meaning: Out of all the students, only those who are studying will pass.

second example: Students, studying for the exam, will pass.
meaning: ALL the students are studying for the exam and they will pass.


Also, the reason why "disposing of" shouldn't work is that the preposition "of" expresses ownership. For example, you could say either "Harvard's Business School" or the "The Business School of Harvard." The difference between them is your level of focus. The first one is the focus on the word "Harvard" while the second one is the focus on the word "The Business School." But both have the same meaning at the end. You could also say "The Eagle's ongoing desease" or "The ongoing dease of the Eagle." So in option A, are we talking about the refrigerator's disposing or are we talking about people who dispose? Plus, refrigerator's disposing can never capture anything...can they? Even if they can, "refrigerator's disposing" is singular while "capture" is plural: still no match

So after knowing that, have a look at the sentence again and see which one will make more sense. I still think that it's B. I think option A would be correct if it was rather written as:

"Those disposing or servicing." Remember, "those" is plural because of the plural verb "capture."
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Jun 2007
Posts: 157
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [1] , given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 03:40
1
This post received
KUDOS
Tarek - I think you're overcomplicating things, somehting that GMAT would be delighted with.

A few things you've said are wrong (not that I think they're relevant anyway).

"you'll see the verb "capture." This verb is in plural form,"
Sorry - this is wrong. Capture follows a modal verb "must" and far from being in the plural form it is in fact an infinitive.

This stuff about of and ownership
"the reason why "disposing of" shouldn't work is that the preposition "of" expresses ownership"
isn't relevant in this case. "To dispose of" is a thing called a phrasal verb and you shouldn't look at the two separate words individually - it's the two words together that make up the verb (other examples would be wake up, get off, get up, set up, hand up etc). "To dispose of" is as different in meaning from "To dispose" as "To get up" is from "To get".

This question seems simple to me. I'd love to see the OA.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 205 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 03:52
but also, the word "or" can never connect 2 singular nouns into plural. Only the word "and" can combine 2 singular nouns into plural form. hmm....this debate is getting interesting....by the way, that's the best way you can do to learn. questioning things that conflict with your knowledge. i enjoy doing that a lot.... hehehe.....i'm now curious about the answer. what's the OA?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2007
Posts: 183
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 06:30
OA is A. I was stuck w/ A and B. Both make sense. But there is a distinction that makes one better than the other.

I've read on other forums that "disposing of" is more accurate than dispose and hence the answer choice A. That may be so, but the argument lacks meat.

Both A and B uses transitive forms of the verb dispose. So I am truly not sure why A is better than B.

Unless B changes the meaning of the sentence...

Last edited by Skewed on 29 Nov 2007, 06:57, edited 1 time in total.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 06:35
Skewed wrote:
After July, anyone disposing of or servicing refrigerators must capture the chlorofluorocarbons in the refrigerant chemicals.

(A) anyone disposing of or servicing

(B) those who dispose or service

(C) anyone disposing of or who services

(D) the disposal or repair of

(E) someone who disposes or repairs

Please Explain.

Thanks.


will go for 'A'
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 205 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 09:59
nnooo wwayyy!!! heheheheh......
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 205 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 10:13
ok, i've done some search on the internet and found this information. hope this can clear your thoughts:

"we always need the preposition "of" to accompany the verb dispose when we want it to mean "get rid of" (and there's that "of" again!). There other meanings of dispose that do not require the "of": a general can "dispose his trooops" (meaning to arrange them); and a matter can be disposed in a legal sense (meaning to settle finally); and we can be disposed to illness (meaning to be inclined). "
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 17:35
Skewed wrote:
OA is A. I was stuck w/ A and B. Both make sense. But there is a distinction that makes one better than the other.

I've read on other forums that "disposing of" is more accurate than dispose and hence the answer choice A. That may be so, but the argument lacks meat.

Both A and B uses transitive forms of the verb dispose. So I am truly not sure why A is better than B.

Unless B changes the meaning of the sentence...


This is how I see it...

Not getting into grammatical nitty gritties...If I have to issue a mandate or directive I would prefer 'anyone' and not 'those who'

in other words is it 'After July, whoever' or 'After July, those who' - I would go for the former...

On the usage of 'dispose'

'dispose of' sb/sth phrasal verb
to get rid of someone or something or deal with something so that the matter is finished:

In 'A' - as anyone is singular. it is in parallel with refrigerators
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 477
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 49 [0], given: 4

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 01 Dec 2007, 13:29
Skewed wrote:
OA is A. I was stuck w/ A and B. Both make sense. But there is a distinction that makes one better than the other.

I've read on other forums that "disposing of" is more accurate than dispose and hence the answer choice A. That may be so, but the argument lacks meat.

Both A and B uses transitive forms of the verb dispose. So I am truly not sure why A is better than B.

Unless B changes the meaning of the sentence...


btw, if A's correct, shouldnt it be 'dispose off' instead of 'dispose of'?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 11 Apr 2008
Posts: 157
Schools: Kellogg(A), Wharton(W), Columbia(D)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 55 [0], given: 0

Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 20 May 2008, 22:23
The phrasal verb explanation is enough to elminate choice B.
B changes the original intended meaning.

The correct form is 'dispose of' and not 'dispose off'.
A is the only remaining candidte and it is fine.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 May 2008
Posts: 143
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2008, 07:31
A made sense buddy!
Current Student
avatar
Status: Now or never
Joined: 07 Aug 2010
Posts: 326
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Technology
GPA: 3.5
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 131 [0], given: 26

GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 01 Aug 2011, 22:27
A it should be as A uses disposing of the correct idiom
_________________

Please press KUDOS if you like my post

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Feb 2011
Posts: 113
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 25

Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2011, 19:15
I was confused b/w A and B. Went w/ A as 'dispose of' sounded better.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 Apr 2008
Posts: 191
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 14 Aug 2011, 15:43
why is dispose wrong? dispose = throw away , so if I say i will dispose this garbage, is this wrong?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Oct 2010
Posts: 32
Schools: HBS, Yale, Darden, Haas
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2012, 13:35
+1 A
Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1788
Followers: 1259

Kudos [?]: 3500 [0], given: 184

Re: Anyone Vs. Those [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2012, 06:45
Expert's post
Hi,

@mrblack - Only the word "dispose" does not mean "to throw away". Why we believe it to be that way is because we use this word in our day-to-day speech in that manner and hence, we think that this is the correct meaning and the correct usage. But that is not true. "Dispose" has multiple dictionary meanings:

1. to give tendency or inclination to: Lack of basic amenities disposed the residents of that area to look for another alternative.
2. to put in a particular or suitable place: At the end of the class, Harry was asked to dispose all the writing books in shelves.
3. to put in a particular or the proper or arrangement: The sports captain asked Amy to quickly dispose her team that would represent their school in inter-school basketball tournament.
4. to make fit or ready; prepare: My preparation has disposed me to confidently take the GMAT.

If we want to use the word "dispose" to mean "throw away", then we have to use it with the preposition "of". Together they make the sense of "throw away".
Example: My mother disposed of all the left over food that was kept on the table.

It is not uncommon to see certain verbs being used with specific prepositions to have a specific meaning.
Examples: 1. Mary has put on a lot of weight. OR Mary had put on so much of make up that it looked bizarre.
2. The teacher put off the dates of examination for the third time in this month.

So, now it is easier to see why choice A is the correct answer.

Thanks.
Shraddha

Image
_________________



Free Webinar: Sep 6, 2014 - Ace GMAT Sentence Correction: Register for this Free Webinar to learn the importance of meaning, achieve 90% accuracy and score V40+. Click here to register.

Re: Anyone Vs. Those   [#permalink] 19 Jan 2012, 06:45
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
GRE vs GMAT- New schools accepting GRE . ANyone taken both? Monyberumen 1 30 Dec 2013, 12:44
GMAT vs GRE for those who studied philosophy jonatande 0 20 May 2012, 12:33
AIB- Dublin vs New York stock prices- Can anyone explain? lumone 5 03 Nov 2008, 12:57
anyone v/s who? alimad 9 21 Sep 2006, 13:07
that vs those? Decibel 8 27 Aug 2005, 04:06
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Anyone Vs. Those

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 22 posts ] 



cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.