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In the rectangular coordinate system, points (4,0) and (-4,

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In the rectangular coordinate system, points (4,0) and (-4, [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 09:34
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A
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E

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In the rectangular coordinate system, points (4,0) and (-4, 0) both lie on circle C. What is the maximum possible value of the radius of C?

(A) 2
(B) 4
(C) 8
(D) 16
(E) There is no finite maximum value
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 10:45
(C) 8

Distance between (4,0) and (-4,0) is 8. Could be the maximum possible value.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 11:26
I think the answer should be 4 because the two points could be the end points of the diameter,

Am i write????
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 11:33
Hi, First post here.

I think the answer is (E). I hope I am right.

There can be any number of circles with different diameters that have a chord of length 8 that falls on the circle. For example, a circle with diameter of 30 can have a chord of length 8 OR a circle with diameter of 100 can have a chord of length 8. If there is a circle with a diameter of 8 then the chord itseld is the diamter.

Last edited by nookway on 07 Aug 2006, 12:19, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 11:39
nookway wrote:
Hi, First post here.

I think the answer is (E). I hope I am right.

There can be any number of circles with different diameters that have a cord of length 8 that falls on the circle. For example, a circle with diameter of 30 can have a chord of length 8 OR a circle with diameter of 100 can have a chord of length 8. If there is a circle with a diameter of 8 then the chord itseld is the diamter.


I am tempted to go with E here too.. there can be any number of values for the radius
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 11:56
I think the answer is E here..

you can think of an arc joining 4 and -4 and the radius of that circle could much larger than any of the numbers given
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 12:07
Agree, it should be (E). You can draw a circle as big as you want and still make it go through two point (4,0) and (-4,0).

Through it would go contrary to GMAT's general rule of not making options with vague/indefinite wording to be correct answers. But this one appears to be the exception.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 12:23
Should be E.

If question asks minimum value then answer is 8.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2006, 02:30
Will go with E.

Minimum value the diameter can have is when the points are the ends points of the diameter. Hence 8

for maximum ....

Line between points can be a chord. 8 can be whereever you want, hence maximum can be anything.
  [#permalink] 08 Aug 2006, 02:30
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