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Biometric access-control systems those using fingerprints,

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Biometric access-control systems those using fingerprints, [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2008, 23:13
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Biometric access-control systems—those using fingerprints, voice prints, etc., to regulate admittance to restricted areas—work by degrees of similarity, not by identity. After all, even the same finger will rarely leave exactly identical prints. Such systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.
Which of the following conclusions is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) If a biometric access-control system were made to work by identity, it would not produce any correct admittance decisions.
(B) If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers.
(C) Biometric access-control systems are appropriate only in situations in which admittance of impostors is less of a problem than is mistaken refusal of access.
(D) Nonbiometric access-control systems—based, for example, on numerical codes—are less likely than biometric ones to admit impostors.
(E) Anyone choosing an access-control system should base the choice solely on the ratio of false refusals to false admittances.

Do post in the explanations !!!
OA given is not at all convincing
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Re: CR-biometrics [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2008, 23:44
Biometric access-control systems—those using fingerprints, voice prints, etc., to regulate admittance to restricted areas—work by degrees of similarity, not by identity. After all, even the same finger will rarely leave exactly identical prints. Such systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.
Which of the following conclusions is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) If a biometric access-control system were made to work by identity, it would not produce any correct admittance decisions. This is a very strong statement. Notice- "it would not produce". The premise says that they do not work by identity, but, we do not know wheather it will produce correct results or not if it works by identity.
(B) If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers. - According to the premise, if the system is adjusted to minimize legitimate refusals and increase the likelihood of admitting imposters, the converse should also be true. This is stated in this answer choice.
(C) Biometric access-control systems are appropriate only in situations in which admittance of impostors is less of a problem than is mistaken refusal of access.- The systems can be appropriate in situations where admittance of imposters can be a major problem also. One can do this by the adjusting the systems. Also, notice "only" here which signifies the strength of the statement.
(D) Nonbiometric access-control systems—based, for example, on numerical codes—are less likely than biometric ones to admit impostors. This is irrelevant, the non-biometric access is out of scope of the argument.
(E) Anyone choosing an access-control system should base the choice solely on the ratio of false refusals to false admittances. This is also irrelevant. Choosing based on the ratio of refusal to false admittance is out of scope.
IMO, it is (B). What is OA?
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Re: CR-biometrics [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2008, 23:59
imo b
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Re: CR-biometrics [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2008, 00:04
spriya wrote:
Biometric access-control systems—those using fingerprints, voice prints, etc., to regulate admittance to restricted areas—work by degrees of similarity, not by identity. After all, even the same finger will rarely leave exactly identical prints. Such systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.
Which of the following conclusions is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) If a biometric access-control system were made to work by identity, it would not produce any correct admittance decisions.
(B) If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers.
(C) Biometric access-control systems are appropriate only in situations in which admittance of impostors is less of a problem than is mistaken refusal of access.
(D) Nonbiometric access-control systems—based, for example, on numerical codes—are less likely than biometric ones to admit impostors.
(E) Anyone choosing an access-control system should base the choice solely on the ratio of false refusals to false admittances.

Do post in the explanations !!!
OA given is not at all convincing



I second B as well.

IF the system is adjusted, something will happen. C talks about where the system can be used after adjustments. I stick to the IF and choose B. Rest of the choices are losers.
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Re: CR-biometrics [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2008, 09:52
leonidas wrote:
Biometric access-control systems—those using fingerprints, voice prints, etc., to regulate admittance to restricted areas—work by degrees of similarity, not by identity. After all, even the same finger will rarely leave exactly identical prints. Such systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.
Which of the following conclusions is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) If a biometric access-control system were made to work by identity, it would not produce any correct admittance decisions. This is a very strong statement. Notice- "it would not produce". The premise says that they do not work by identity, but, we do not know wheather it will produce correct results or not if it works by identity.
(B) If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers. - According to the premise, if the system is adjusted to minimize legitimate refusals and increase the likelihood of admitting imposters, the converse should also be true. This is stated in this answer choice.
(C) Biometric access-control systems are appropriate only in situations in which admittance of impostors is less of a problem than is mistaken refusal of access.- The systems can be appropriate in situations where admittance of imposters can be a major problem also. One can do this by the adjusting the systems. Also, notice "only" here which signifies the strength of the statement.
(D) Nonbiometric access-control systems—based, for example, on numerical codes—are less likely than biometric ones to admit impostors. This is irrelevant, the non-biometric access is out of scope of the argument.
(E) Anyone choosing an access-control system should base the choice solely on the ratio of false refusals to false admittances. This is also irrelevant. Choosing based on the ratio of refusal to false admittance is out of scope.
IMO, it is (B). What is OA?


Agreed on B but one query on cause and effect!!
if x causes y
can we say when not y occurs not x is there

argument : systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.

choice :
If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers.

im usually confused in this relation kindly shed some light on this
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Re: CR-biometrics [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2008, 10:34
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can we say when not y occurs not x is there
argument : systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.
choice :
If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Usually, for cause and effect, it is helpful when we dissect the argument apart:
A= Decrease in refusal to real users.
B= Increase in imposter admission.

In this case, A causes B (Given from the stem) We can not deny this.

The possible variations are:
1) Increase in imposter admission -> decrease in refusal to real users (Given)
2) Increase in refusal to real users-> decrease in imposter admission (Derived statement that must be true based on given)

The answer choice actually reiterates 2). Hence B.
For Cause and effect arguments, it is good to write a couple of words with increase and decrease arrows and understand the relationship prior to reading the answer choices. This greatly helps (atleast to me), to eliminate the incorect ones. This question might not warranty a diagram or notes, however, some of the complex cause and effect arguments (similar to puzzles) might do.
Hope this helps!!!!!!
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Re: CR-biometrics [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2008, 16:52
leonidas wrote:
can we say when not y occurs not x is there
argument : systems can be adjusted to minimize refusals of access to legitimate access-seekers. Such adjustments, however, increase the likelihood of admitting impostors.
choice :
If a biometric access-control system reliably prevents impostors from being admitted, it will sometimes turn away legitimate access-seekers.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Usually, for cause and effect, it is helpful when we dissect the argument apart:
A= Decrease in refusal to real users.
B= Increase in imposter admission.

In this case, A causes B (Given from the stem) We can not deny this.

The possible variations are:
1) Increase in imposter admission -> decrease in refusal to real users (Given)
2) Increase in refusal to real users-> decrease in imposter admission (Derived statement that must be true based on given)

The answer choice actually reiterates 2). Hence B.
For Cause and effect arguments, it is good to write a couple of words with increase and decrease arrows and understand the relationship prior to reading the answer choices. This greatly helps (atleast to me), to eliminate the incorect ones. This question might not warranty a diagram or notes, however, some of the complex cause and effect arguments (similar to puzzles) might do.
Hope this helps!!!!!!

+1 for
this a good explanation.
its good to break the argument and derive the relationship between cause and effect.
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Re: CR-biometrics   [#permalink] 09 Aug 2008, 16:52
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