Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 17 Sep 2014, 09:53

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2009
Posts: 141
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 32 [0], given: 97

GMAT Tests User
In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2012, 08:16
In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, some educational philosophers have swung sharply to an espousal of “life experience” as the sole source of learning. Using their narrow interpretation of John Dewey’s theories for support and spouting such phrases as “Teach the child, not the subject,” they demand an end to rigorous study and insist that only through doing can learning take place. While not all adherents to this philosophy would totally eliminate the study of great books, the gradual subordination of literature in the school curriculum reflects their influence.

What is the purpose of literature? Why read if life alone is to be our teacher? James Joyce tells us that the artist reveals the human condition by re-creating life out of life; Aristotle, that art presents universal truths because its form is taken from nature. Thus, consciously or otherwise, great writers extend our understanding of ourselves and our world. We can soar with them to the heights of aspiration or plummet with them to the depths of despair. How much wider is the understanding we gain from reading than from viewing life through the keyhole of our individual experience.

This function of literature, the enlarging of our life sphere, is of major importance in itself. Additionally, however, literature suggests solutions to social problems. The overweening ambitions of political leaders—and their sneering contempt for the law—did not appear for the first time in the writings of Bernstein and Woodward. The problems and behavior of the guilt-ridden did not await the appearance of the bearded psychoanalysts of the nineteenth century.

Federal Judge Learned Hand wrote, “I venture to believe that it is as important to a judge called upon to pass on a question of constitutional law, to have at least a bowing acquaintance with Thucydides, Gibbon, and Carlyle, with Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, and Milton, with Montaigne and Rabelais, with Plato, Bacon, Hume, and Kant, as with the books which have been specifically written on the subject. For in such matters everything turns upon the spirit in which he approaches the questions before him.”
How do we overcome our dissenter? We must start with the field of agreement: the belief that education should serve to improve the individual and society. We must persuade our dissenters that the voices of human experience stretch our human faculties and open us to learning. We must convince them of the unity of life and art. We must prove to them that far from being separate, literature is that part of life that illumines life.
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
(A) list the writers who make up the backbone of a great literature curriculum
(B) explain the function of literature
(C) advocate the adoption of a new philosophy of education
(D) plead for the retention of great literature as a fundamental part of the school curriculum
(E) overcome the opposition of Dewey’s followers to the inclusion of contemporary literature in the curriculum
[Reveal] Spoiler:
D


2. It can be inferred from the passage that the author considers those who believe in “‘life experience’ as the sole source of learning” (line 3) to be
(A) practical
(B) progressive
(C) misguided
(D) inflexible
(E) ignorant
[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


3. The passage supplies information to suggest that the author and the educational philosophers mentioned in the first paragraph would agree that
(A) learning is the key to adaptability in an ever-changing environment
(B) the traditional classroom should be transformed into a learning laboratory
(C) the purpose of education is to improve society as well as the individual
(D) one must know history in order to understand the present and the future
(E) the primary aim of education is the transmission of culture
[Reveal] Spoiler:
C


4. It can be inferred from the passage that the author makes which of the following assumptions about his readers?
(A) They believe that schools should reflect society.
(B) They believe that the subject, not the child, should be taught.
(C) They favor a return to the classical curriculum.
(D) They share his view that the study of great books is essential to education.
(E) They believe that only through reading can learning take place.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
D


Please see highlighted text narrow interpreation would imply inflexible and not misguided the answer should then be D not C why is the answer C in this question 2

Please explain.. Thanks for your time and help
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2011
Posts: 60
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 7

Re: In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, [#permalink] New post 25 Aug 2012, 07:05
I believe "We must persuade our dissenters that the voices of human experience stretch " - this led to believe that they are misguided
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Apr 2012
Posts: 73
GMAT Date: 11-02-2012
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 17

Re: In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2012, 08:35
The primary purpose of the passage is:
(A) list the writers who make up the backbone of a great literature curriculum
(B) explain the function of literature
(C) advocate the adoption of a new philosophy of education
(D) plead for the retention of great literature as a fundamental part of the school curriculum
(E) overcome the opposition of Dewey’s followers to the inclusion of contemporary literature in the curriculum


Please explain your reasons for the above question from the same passage.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Fighting again to Kill the GMAT devil
Joined: 02 Jun 2009
Posts: 137
Location: New Delhi
WE 1: Oil and Gas - Engineering & Construction
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 27 [0], given: 48

Re: In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2012, 09:55
venmic wrote:

It can be inferred from the passage that the author considers those who believe in “‘life experience’ as the sole source of learning” (line 3) to be
(A) practical
(B) progressive
(C) misguided
(D) inflexible
(E) ignorant


Please see highlighted text narrow interpreation would imply inflexible and not misguided the answer should then be D not C why is the answer C in this question

Please explain.. Thanks for your time and help



I will refer to these lines for an answer to this question -
"While not all adherents to this philosophy would totally eliminate the study of great books, the gradual subordination of literature in the school curriculum reflects their influence."

This line states that NOT ALL adherents of this philosophy - "More Doing than learning" would discard the study of great books, thus implying that there are still some people amongst that group who believe that studying books do help.

Thus suggesting that these people are not inflexible, as not all of them share same rigid thoughts, but few of them do support learning by books.

Hence {C} is the answer.
_________________

Giving Kudos, is a great Way to Help the GC Community Kudos

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Fighting again to Kill the GMAT devil
Joined: 02 Jun 2009
Posts: 137
Location: New Delhi
WE 1: Oil and Gas - Engineering & Construction
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 27 [0], given: 48

Re: In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2012, 10:05
vivekdixit07 wrote:
The primary purpose of the passage is:
(A) list the writers who make up the backbone of a great literature curriculum
(B) explain the function of literature
(C) advocate the adoption of a new philosophy of education
(D) plead for the retention of great literature as a fundamental part of the school curriculum
(E) overcome the opposition of Dewey’s followers to the inclusion of contemporary literature in the curriculum


Please explain your reasons for the above question from the same passage.


To answer such question - IT is imperative to understand the Tone of the passage - in the first passage it suggests how some people detest Learning books but emphasize that doing things will make children learn better.

Then in second passage how the author puts together a great piece of convincing to suggest that by studying books we learn a lot not only about our own self, but also about life and various experiences.

Thus overall the Passage is trying in its requesting tone for those people {who do not believe much in learning by books} to understand why and how studying by books will make children know more of human tendencies and faculties thus enriching their experience.

(A) Author Lists various writers just as an example to qualify that what essential things one can learn from various authors - he does not mean to list writers of great literature curriculum. Reject A.
(B) Author is not explaining the function of Literature, instead he is elaborating the benefits children can have on learning by studying great authors. Reject B.
(C) Advocate the new philosophy of education - No where the passage describes learning from books as "NEW" philosophy - Reject C.
(D) Yes that's the nearest AC you have out of all the 5 options available.
(E) Overcome opposition of Dewey's followers - this may be the case for first passage but its not the Primary Purpose of the Passage. Reject E.
_________________

Giving Kudos, is a great Way to Help the GC Community Kudos

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Posts: 117
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Finance
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 56

Re: In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2014, 06:45
Experts
Need to explain question "D".

What should be ideal time to attack the passage.

Rgds
Prasannajeet
Re: In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum,   [#permalink] 17 Apr 2014, 06:45
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic MGMAT's Rigid Stance :( Hussain15 5 19 Jun 2010, 08:05
classical music puma 3 11 Apr 2008, 07:36
In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum, eyunni 5 04 Dec 2007, 19:32
Earth's surface consists of rigid plates that are mbassmbass04 4 01 Oct 2005, 14:36
Earth's surface consists of rigid plates that are chunjuwu 14 10 Feb 2005, 17:06
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In reaction to a rigid, overrefined classical curriculum,

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.