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Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the

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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2009, 16:39
IMO A

OA?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 14:55
Answer is B
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 17:05
going with A

the question asks which one is supported by the passage, not the other way around...

Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story. -correct, it says "often mystery stories ....."
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story. not this because didn't mention whether readers solve mystery by doing that.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery. -not this because clues are given in article for detective to infer the solution, didnt mention readers.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion. -didn't mention this
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution. -didn't mention this.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 17:13
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story. - This is true anyways, but this does not support the argument.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story. - This is not indicated anywhere in the passage that authors can solve the mystery by spotting the errors of dull companion. So not correct.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery. - This might be true for "some" of the mystery stories, but it does not support the information given in the passage.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion. - Correct. The actions of detective "rarely" divert readers from actions of the dull companion. This is the motive of the mystery story. But the word "rarely" also indicates that sometimes readers might also solve the mystery, if not always.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution. - This is anyways mentioned in the passage above.


IMO D. OA?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 17:51
Conclusion : The author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.

(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story - The conclusion is not concerned about featuring of a detective who solves mystery
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story - This is the best choice because it states how readers can solve the mystery.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery - We are not talking about mystery stories giving clues to infer.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion - We are not talking about actions.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution - Close choice but only covers one part of conclusion i.e. diversion from correct solution. It does not tell anything how to solve the mystery.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 18:22
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.


(A) Sounds almost right, but I wouldn't consider this answer choice the most strongly supported by the stimulus
(B) Not supported by what's been presented in the stimulus
(C) Best option ---because of--- "Clues are presented in the story" + "the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery"
(D) No mention of this anywhere in the stimulus. In such "most strongly supported" questions, we cannot bring in outside information. The answer must be based on the facts presented in the stimulus. Here, it talks only about diversion from the correct solution (not from the actions of the detective's dull companion).
(E) Close, however the clues per se are not misleading. The interpretation though (made by the dull companion) is.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 18:35
Looks like nobody liked D other than me. What is OA anyways?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 18:55
OA pls..... almost all choices have been discussed as correct option.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2009, 00:41
C for me
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2009, 04:59
Hi hgp2k!

Well my second choice is (D), so you are not alone! :-D

But when do we have the OA?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2009, 20:24
This suspense is killing me! I want know who got the right answer??
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 08 Oct 2009, 23:02
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.

A: is my choice.

B: i think in the article it says author diverts readers from the correct solution.

C: not mentioned

D: not mentioned

E:
noboru wrote:
the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution.
so dc doesn't uncover the misleading clues.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 10 Oct 2009, 14:41
Anybody else before i clear up all this thing?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2009, 02:14
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.

Here the premises are :

1. Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective's dull companion.
2. The detective's dull companion infers an wrong solution to the mystery using the same
clues
as used by the detective.

Lastly the conclusion says that author's strategy for including the dull companion gives readers a chance to
solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution..

From the conclusion it can clearly be inferred that the author's main strategy is not to let the readers come to the correct solution which would otherwise deem the brilliance of the so called brilliant detective paltry and common place.Hence the introduction of the dull companion who would effectively twist the meaning of the given clues in directions other than intended so that the brilliant detective have the chance to show his brilliance later on with the same set of clues and arrive unto the right solution.

Here it should be noted that the answer to this question need not be accurate but the best amongst the given answer choices.Also it has to be noted that the question stem is not asking for any kind of gist but only a view which can be best supported by the given paragarph.

Now to the answer choices,


Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?

(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.

- To me this is the only statement which can be supported by the passage as the author is saying that it is the brilliant detective who always invariably come to the correct solution.Though this statement doesn't talk about the dull companions at all, it should not matter to us as the question is only asking if the statement can be supported by the passage which it does.

(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.

- The statement above says that the readers often solve the mystery by spotting mistakes in the reasoning of the dull companion.That would effectively mean that the readers' reasoning is better and in other words they are not mislead by the dull companion's reasoning and hence invariably come to the right solution.But this inference would be against the author's stated conlusion which says that the alternate purpose is to divert the attention of the readers from the right solution.Hence this can not be right as it is contradicting the conclusion.

(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.

- The passage doesn't talk about the sufficiency of clues to enable the reader to solve the mystery.Hence is not
relevant.

(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.

- This statement is actually contradicting the conclusion and also not relevant to the passage as the above passage only talks about author's strategy and the success of the author's strategy( i.e diverting the readers from the correct solution) is not covered in the passage.


(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.

- This may look tempting but should be wrong because the author specifically say that both detective as well as his dull companion use the same set of clues to arrive upon different solution.Hence it is not the clues but different reasoning of the same clues which have lead to different solutions.

Hence the clues are not misleading but the interpretetions are.Hence E can not be true.


Hence my answer is A.

Please tell me if my reasoning is in anyway faulty.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2009, 07:53
Mega2010 wrote:
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.

- To me this is the only statement which can be supported by the passage as the author is saying that it is the brilliant detective who always invariably come to the correct solution.Though this statement doesn't talk about the dull companions at all, it should not matter to us as the question is only asking if the statement can be supported by the passage which it does.

(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.

- The passage doesn't talk about the sufficiency of clues to enable the reader to solve the mystery.Hence is not relevant.


This has grown into an interesting thread. Since Mega2010 and others have put in a lot of effort, I will try to back my earlier post with an explanation of why I think option (A) is not the most strongly supported and why (C) is.

---->
Notice the first sentence in the stimulus says: "Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective....."
On the other hand, choice (A) says: "Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective....."

The subtle difference between the two is that the stimulus has "Often", which is an adverb of frequency, whereas the answer choice has "Most", a quantifier. The first gives us a sense of the frequency of occurrence of the feature. The answer choice, on the other hand, emphasizes the quantity aspect of stories. Consider this example below - I hope it helps in understanding the slight difference (distortion) in meaning/context.
Cities often take loans from the central government.
v/s
Most cities take loans from the central government.

Here's another reason in my view: "most" is a strong quantifier. Unless stated explicitly in the stimulus, it is difficult to defend. And for this precise reason, the use of "Some" in option (C) makes it easier to defend.

---->
I think answer choice (C) "Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery" is the best option because:

- The stimulus states "Clues are presented in the story" and "The author’s strategy ... gives readers a chance to solve the mystery" => implying that enough clues are presented to give the readers a chance/potential to arrive at the right solution. 'Enough' here is implicit, otherwise (i.e. with, say, only a clue or two) the readers wouldn't have a chance.

- "Some" is easier to defend (than "most" in option (A)).

My 2 cents :) Let us know what the OA is.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2009, 09:39
noboru wrote:
Anybody else before i clear up all this thing?


I think all the options are already discussed. So it should be OK to reveal the OA and OE.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2009, 06:35
hgp2k wrote:
noboru wrote:
Anybody else before i clear up all this thing?


I think all the options are already discussed. So it should be OK to reveal the OA and OE.


Hi Noboru!

Plz post the OA & OE B4 I write my GMAT! Waiting since long!! Can't hold it anynore!!!!
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2009, 13:40
OA is C. The question is from the Power Score CR Bible which is a very helpful material. I am posting the answer here since ppl has been asking for 3 weeks.

Answer is not E because the stimulus states that the dull companion infers a wrong solution from clues that the detective ultimately uses to solve the mystery but this answer states that the dull companion uncovers misleading clues.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2009, 23:42
I would also go with A, which is the only claim explicitly stated in the text IMO.

Why would that be wrong according to the OA?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2009, 09:09
andershv wrote:
I would also go with A, which is the only claim explicitly stated in the text IMO.

Why would that be wrong according to the OA?


OE: The word "often" in the first sentence is the key to this answer choice. "Often" means frequently, but frequently is not the same as "most".
Re: Sherlock Holmes   [#permalink] 20 Oct 2009, 09:09
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