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One Bad Grade

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One Bad Grade [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2010, 08:29
Hello Mr. Chu,

I fulfilled my high school requirements in two years and enrolled in a local university @ age 15. I completed one year of coursework at this university (let’s call it “State University”) before proceeding on to the college where I would later obtain my bachelor degree (let’s call it “4-year college”). I finished my degree in 3 1/2 years after crediting some of my State University coursework from the gap year between high school and 4-year college.

Unfortunately, after finding in high school that top grades could be obtained with little effort, I received a D-minus in Calculus 1 at State University. I figured I could waltz in there without studying and get an A; clearly I was wrong. The naiveté of youth. Fortunately this detachment from hard studying did not prevent me from maintaining a 3.4 average at State University excluding that poor Calculus 1 grade.

My question is as follows: should I take advantage of State University’s “repeat policy” by taking Calculus 1 in the evenings after work while I have the chance? I am a much more serious student now and know that I would receive an A this time around. But would the adcoms even care? The reason I wonder why they may not is because:

1) This D-minus is going to be 11 years old by the time I apply
2) My GMAT is in the 99th percentile with 49 on the quantitative portion (87th percentile)

Will I even have to submit the transcript from State University in that I did not obtain a degree from that institution? Unfortunately, due to the fact I did transfer some credits from State University toward my undergraduate degree at 4-year college (credit was given for 12 credits in total), my 4-year college transcript states at the top “transfer from State University.” So clearly the adcom’s will know of my time at State University but will they care? And, to reiterate, even if they do care enough to want to see the transcript, will the D-minus in any way adversely affect my chances?

Many thanks for your time.

Last edited by Akkadian on 27 Mar 2010, 09:36, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: One Bad Grade [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2010, 20:15
Your post baffles me to be honest. It just seems you're way off the mark or you need a sea change in perspective here. Seriously dude, I hope you're not still freaked out about getting a D in a class that happened long ago?!?! Maybe it's lost in translation (given the formality of your writing I'm guessing English isn't your first language), but you're making it sound as if you're guilt-ridden over an assault charge or something.

Loosen up. :-)

Whether it's b-school admissions, getting jobs (beyond the entry level), networking, friendships, relationships, blah blah blah it's not about being perfect. It's about being compelling. Most people aren't perfect - they have blemishes, imperfections, failures, etc in their history. And further, if you're spotless or you don't have any real flaws or failures in your history, chances are you probably don't have much talent or success either. Because they go hand in hand.

Admissions people aren't overbearing parents who see applicants as 3-year old kids. Again it's not about being perfect, it's about being compelling -- and compelling people have their share of flaws as well as talents/achievements - that's what makes them dynamic, interesting and *real*.
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Re: One Bad Grade [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2010, 12:08
Thanks Alex for your quick reply.

AlexMBAApply wrote:
Loosen up. :-)


Clearly it is no secret that I am an uptight perfectionist. My conscious mind would love to loosen up but my subconscious is not having any of it.

AlexMBAApply wrote:
Your post baffles me


I am honored; given the thousands of posts you have read, I would think it really takes something to baffle you!

AlexMBAApply wrote:
to be honest.


Please do be honest. You tell people what they need to hear. I think that is why you have attracted such a following in the MBA-aspirant community.

AlexMBAApply wrote:
Maybe it's lost in translation (given the formality of your writing I'm guessing English isn't your first language)


Hopefully the "Mr. Chu" was not off-putting; I was only trying to be respectful. Politesse is lacking in our society and it never hurts to exhibit some.

Actually, English is my first language. These words come from the product of American public schools. Amazing, eh? I realize most of my peers are barely literate, but it doesn't mean we need to lower the bar. We are only recently starting to "cut the tall poppy" in this country. Give it another 20 years.

AlexMBAApply wrote:
that's what makes them dynamic, interesting and *real*.


I take your response to mean that repeating the course would be viewed by the adcoms as my not having my priorities straight? Like a kid retaking a 770? In this light, it could actually be viewed as detrimental to my application? My other grades + GMAT would quiet any concerns that the D-minus may raise about my quantitative ability?

Again, I appreciate your time and hope this doesn't put you out.

Best regards! :wink:
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Re: One Bad Grade [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2010, 08:25
Don't worry about the grade.
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Re: One Bad Grade [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2010, 09:47
Easier said than done. :-D

Thanks again. Keep up the good work.
Re: One Bad Grade   [#permalink] 27 Mar 2010, 09:47
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