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Research during the past several decades on the nature of

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Research during the past several decades on the nature of [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2004, 15:35
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Research during the past several decades on the nature of language and the processes that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity.

(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(D) by which it is produced and understood have revealed great complexity rather than underlying simplicity
(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Language [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 01:11
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syamee_u wrote:
singh_satya wrote:
Research during the past several decades on the nature of language and the processes that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity.
(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(D) by which it is produced and understood have revealed great complexity rather than underlying simplicity
(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity


A or C.
Explain plz
Thanks
Satya


sorry ..

my choice :D 50 seconds

processes <by which it is produced and understood > + have should come. Not "HAS"

(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity

in this choice "it" is not correct in pronoun number as noun x and y. it should be them. however meaning also not correct

(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity

in this choice "it" is not correct in pronoun number

(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity

singular verb "has" not matching with plural subject processes

(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity

awkward.

comments PLZ.


The subject here is RESEARCH (a singular). Therefore, we need verb HAS, which is in A and C. The other options are out.

Between A and C, I, however, opt for A.
"processes by which it is ... understood" does not seem to be as clear as "processes that produce and make it understandable "
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Re: several decades on the nature of language [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2009, 10:47
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The subject of the sentence is "research," all of the other fluff in between can be ignored.

Since "research" is singular, the verb tense must also be singular. Answers B, D, and E all use the plural verb "have," so eliminate answers B, D, and E

Between answers A and C, "by which it..." is wordy and awkward construction.

I would pick answer A
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2004, 18:40
C is best
in A: Processes that produce language seems illogical to me and changes the meaning of the sentence. It is as if the processes were producing language.
C is better in saying that processes are a means by which language is produced.
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Re: Language [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 00:42
singh_satya wrote:
Research during the past several decades on the nature of language and the processes that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity.
(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(D) by which it is produced and understood have revealed great complexity rather than underlying simplicity
(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity


A or C.
Explain plz
Thanks
Satya


sorry ..

my choice :D 50 seconds

processes <by which it is produced and understood > + have should come. Not "HAS"

(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity

in this choice "it" is not correct in pronoun number as noun x and y. it should be them. however meaning also not correct

(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity

in this choice "it" is not correct in pronoun number

(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity

singular verb "has" not matching with plural subject processes

(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity

awkward.

comments PLZ.
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Re: Language [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 01:46
I'll go for C
I don't like A because
1) instead of "processes that produce and make it understandable" it is better "processes that produce IT and make IT understandable"
2) even then I still doubt that processes can produce anything
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 03:58
IMO (C) is best.

I didn't like the second part of (A) --> "great complexity instead of underlying simplicity".
The corresponding part in (C) is better. "has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity"
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 11:38
OAis A
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 11:48
A says "processes that produce and make it understandable has revealed"

I'm confused here.

Is it the "research" that has revealed great complexity OR
the "processes" that have revealed great complexity ?

I believe the "that" after processes is close to the action reveal and makes A sound faulty.
A should have "have" instead of "has".
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 12:08
Got it A,

In C, Research ...........has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity. I think it should be has not revealed .......
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2005, 04:52
Bhai wrote:
Got it A,

In C, Research ...........has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity. I think it should be has not revealed .......



Hello, Bhai, I think you are a little misunderstood.

C is right in parallel.

according parallelism, it should be not A but B.

Any explanation? Thanks.
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Re: Language [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2005, 05:09
singh_satya wrote:
Research during the past several decades on the nature of language and the processes that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity.
(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(D) by which it is produced and understood have revealed great complexity rather than underlying simplicity
(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity

Satya


A-HA, I got it why not C. A and C are two kind of meaning.

Guys, reviewed A more carefully.

(A)..... process that produce(watch out! there is no objective) and make it(research) understandable.
There are two actions; one is produce, and the other is make it understandable. (we don't know produce what? )

However, in (C). Passive voice is ambiguous
(.... by which it is produced and understood ..... )

(is preposition by a common preposition or not ?)

we cannot make sure preposition by belongs which verb? ( be produced by? be understood by? or both)

I hope you understand what I'm talking about.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2005, 07:37
I don't understand this either. I initially picked (A) but there is no grammatical explanation behind my picking (A).
Now why is (C) wrong though?
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2005, 08:26
Please conclude which is wrong or right?

I picked (C) over (A), but no specific grammatical reason. Please confirm what is the reason behind picking (A).

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Re: SC: Language [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2005, 09:25
(C) is not good because it uses passive voice non necessarily. However (A) is wrong because it misses a "it" after "produce", as if it was saying the processes "produce it understandable" and "make it understandable".

Do we know the source of the question? OE?
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Re: SC: Language [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2005, 12:01
HongHu wrote:
(C) is not good because it uses passive voice non necessarily. However (A) is wrong because it misses a "it" after "produce", as if it was saying the processes "produce it understandable" and "make it understandable".

Do we know the source of the question? OE?


I think "A" is best here. Can't we say e.g. "Plz give me that tomato, we are going to cut and chop it in half".....I think the last and only "it" can stand for both cut it and chop it....right ?
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2005, 12:23
Exactly. If you say "cut and chop it in half" that means you "cut it in half and chop it in half". If you say "produce and make it understandable", it would mean "produce it understandable and make it understandable". However "produce it understandable" is obviously not right. What you should say is "produce it and make it understandable."
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2005, 14:15
HongHu wrote:
Exactly. If you say "cut and chop it in half" that means you "cut it in half and chop it in half". If you say "produce and make it understandable", it would mean "produce it understandable and make it understandable". However "produce it understandable" is obviously not right. What you should say is "produce it and make it understandable."

I agree with Hong A is unclear with its use of "it" and C changes the sentence using passive voice which makes the sentence inappropriate because it can be rephrased in active without losing the meaning
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Research during the past several decades on the nature of [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2005, 08:02
Research during the past several decades on the nature of language and the processes that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity.
(A) that produce and make it understandable has revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
(B) of producing and understanding it have revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(C) by which it is produced and understood has revealed not underlying simplicity but great complexity
(D) by which it is produced and understood have revealed great complexity rather than underlying simplicity
(E) by which one produces and understands it have revealed great complexity instead of underlying simplicity
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2005, 08:35
I. Do we need a singular verb? Hope it's yes.
so (B) (D) and (E) are out.

II. "Instead of" or "not...but...."? I prefer "instead of"

(A)?
  [#permalink] 17 Apr 2005, 08:35
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